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From the Publisher

Lies are his specialty, but sometimes the truth can be deadly.

Actor turned private investigator Charlie Ziffkin has traced a stolen sculpture to the hometown that haunts him. He needs to find the statue and get out of town fast, but when he learns the police use his former sweetheart Juliana Sanchez’s psychic abilities to locate stolen goods, their reunion seems fated. He loved her as a boy; as a man with a terrible secret, he has to let her go.

Juliana knows firsthand how well Charlie plays whatever role suits him, whether P.I. or lover, so he could be pretending to desire her while using her to find the sculpture. He stole her teenage heart and now she’s risking it again, but if she doesn’t help him, he’ll be in even greater danger. Being with him is the ultimate thrill . . . until bullets fly.

Charlie and Juliana are in over their heads with ruthless men willing to kill, and with the sizzling attraction they can’t control. Will this be the last role this chameleon ever plays?

Sensuality Level: Sensual

Published: F&W, a Content and eCommerce Company on
ISBN: 9781440567124
List price: $4.99
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