• book

From the Publisher

As a young boy, Buddy Levy accompanied his father into the pre-dawn twilight to hunt birds—particularly the chukar partridge. That youthful experience marked the beginning of Levy's reverence for the chukar and his indefatigable passion for hunting it. Here, Levy presents a lyrical and honest look at the world of hunting this "gorgeous, complicated, strong-flying" bird. He explores the complex (and controversial) layers of hunting through powerful descriptions of the hunt itself, the natural history of the bird, the grueling physicality of upland pursuit, the companionship of a worthy bird dog, and thoughtful reflections on the enduring allure of sport hunting.
Published: Diversion Books on
ISBN: 9780982905005
List price: $2.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Echoes on Rimrock: In Pursuit of the Chukar Partridge
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

TIME
1 min read

The Dark Origins of Dog Breeding

OLIVIA B. WAXMAN EVEN PEOPLE WHO AREN’T DOG OWNERS probably know that purebreds are considered the best—at least in terms of price, aesthetics and dog-show titles. But purebreds have a less pure origin story. In fact, when competitive dog shows first emerged in 19th century Britain, they were less about dogs and more about establishing a social hierarchy. Women often weren’t allowed to show their dogs with men, and most competitions made working-class pet owners show their dogs after their richer counterparts, “when all the good dogs had gone home,” says Michael Worboys, a specialist on the
Popular Science
2 min read

Why This Wily Little Badger Buried A Whole Cow

Evan Buechley Oh the agony of being full, and still having more delicious food on your plate. You chow down on a perfectly cooked steak until you’re totally stuffed, but the steak is still sitting there, taunting you. Do you throw it out? No, of course not, you aren’t a monster. You wrap it up and keep it for later, hiding it in the back of the fridge so your pesky family members won’t eat your treasure before you have a chance to finish it off. Just like a badger. In a study published in Western North American Naturalist last week, biologists outline just how far badgers will go to keep their
Nautilus
2 min read

Why Birds Love Mobs

When I tell Katie Sieving, an avian wildlife ecologist at the University of Florida, that it’s probably a stretch to call “mobbing” an act of heroism, she laughs. Mobbing, as the term suggests, involves a mob: It’s when a group of animals band together to harass and drive out a common predator—a behavior already well-known to the ancients by the time Aristotle described it in 350 BC, in Historia Animalium. Squirrels, fish, African ungulates, otters, and even insects will mob predators, but birds have developed it to an art form. Sieving calls the small North American songbirds she studies, kno