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From the Publisher

Why pay for costumes, scenery, props or actors when the most brilliant drama of all time is unfolding before your very eyes, in vivid color--in 1050 A.D.?

Join the film crew of that stupendous motion picture saga VIKING COLUMBUS as they journey back in time to capture history in the making.


At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Published: Macmillan Publishers on
ISBN: 9781466823297
List price: $7.99
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