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From the Publisher

"Fascinating... a regular field manual... meticulously researched and very entertaining." --G. Gordon Liddy

A thoroughly revised and updated edition of the essential guide to preserving your personal security

From cyberspace to crawl spaces, new innovations in information gathering have left the private life of the average person open to scrutiny, and worse, exploitation. In this thoroughly updated third edition of his immensely popular guide How to Be Invisible, J.J. Luna shows you how to protect your home address, hide your ownership of vehicles and real estate, use pagers with dumbphones, switch to low-profile banking and invisible money transfers, use alternate signatures, and how to secretly run a home-based business.

J.J. Luna is an expert and highly trained security consultant with years of experience protecting himself, his family, and his clients. Using real life stories and his own consulting experience, J.J. Luna divulges legal methods to attain the privacy you crave and deserve, whether you want to shield yourself from casual scrutiny or take your life savings with you and disappear without a trace. Whatever your needs, Luna reveals the shocking secrets that private detectives and other seekers of personal information use to uncover information and then shows how to make a serious commitment to safeguarding yourself.

There is a prevailing sense in our society that true privacy is a thing of the past. In a world where privacy concerns that only continue to grow in magnitude, How to Be Invisible, Third Edition is a critical antidote to the spread of new and more efficient ways of undermining our personal security.

Privacy is a commonly-lamented casualty of the Information Age and of the world's changing climate--but that doesn't mean you have to stand for it. This new edition of J. J. Luna's classic manual contains step-by-step advice on building and maintaining your personal security, including brand new chapters on:
- The dangers from Facebook, smartphones, and facial recognition
- How to locate a nominee (or proxy) you can trust
- The art of pretexting, aka social engineering
- Moving to Baja California Sur; San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato; Cuenca, Ecuador; or Spain's Canary Islands
- The secrets of international privacy, and much more!

Published: Macmillan Publishers on
ISBN: 9781250015150
List price: $12.99
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