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First published in 1966, this celebrated book--Sontag's first collection of essays--quickly became a modern classic, and has had an enormous influence in America and abroad on thinking about the arts and contemporary culture. As well as the title essay and the famous "Notes on Camp," Against Interpretation includes original and provocative discussions of Sartre, Simone Weil, Godard, Beckett, science-fiction movies, psychoanalysis, and contemporary religious thinking. This edition features a new afterword by Sontag.

Published: Macmillan Publishers on
ISBN: 9781466853522
List price: $9.99
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I read this book a long time ago. It now resides in a cardboard box in my attic. Its neighbors are a desultory collection of books with which it likely has very little in common and to which it probably feels quite superior. I recall that good things are said about Jean-Luc Godard. Does anyone now say anything good about Jean-Luc Godard? Or anything at all?more
This book makes me think that Susan Sontag was pretty cool in addition to being really smart. She seems to be really interested in certain aspects of culture and themes in art, and then just writes essays on the subject (a very European style of discourse). My favorites in this collection were "Camus' Notebooks" (especially the idea that writers should either be "husbands" or "lovers" to their readers...each category has it's own plusses), essays about the films of Bresson and Godard, "Notes on 'Camp'", and "One culture and the new sensibility." All of these essays were written in the 1960s, but excluding some of the references, I believe many are still relevant today regarding art criticism. I skipped most of the section dealing with plays and theater, but with a section on the novel, a section on film, and another on broader trends, there's plenty to get caught up in.more
I remember when I first read this book it was an old library copy from way back in the mid-60s when this book first came out. On the back was a picture of the lovely author looking all fine and sultry. The essays contained within were erudite and intellectual and made my 15-year-old wannabe intellectual self feel smart and sophisticated. Major crush on author ensued. Only later discovered that the author had been OLD since the early 70s. Sadness. Still, a book for making you feel smart. Maybe I'd have something more substantial to say if I actually WAS smart.more
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Reviews

I read this book a long time ago. It now resides in a cardboard box in my attic. Its neighbors are a desultory collection of books with which it likely has very little in common and to which it probably feels quite superior. I recall that good things are said about Jean-Luc Godard. Does anyone now say anything good about Jean-Luc Godard? Or anything at all?more
This book makes me think that Susan Sontag was pretty cool in addition to being really smart. She seems to be really interested in certain aspects of culture and themes in art, and then just writes essays on the subject (a very European style of discourse). My favorites in this collection were "Camus' Notebooks" (especially the idea that writers should either be "husbands" or "lovers" to their readers...each category has it's own plusses), essays about the films of Bresson and Godard, "Notes on 'Camp'", and "One culture and the new sensibility." All of these essays were written in the 1960s, but excluding some of the references, I believe many are still relevant today regarding art criticism. I skipped most of the section dealing with plays and theater, but with a section on the novel, a section on film, and another on broader trends, there's plenty to get caught up in.more
I remember when I first read this book it was an old library copy from way back in the mid-60s when this book first came out. On the back was a picture of the lovely author looking all fine and sultry. The essays contained within were erudite and intellectual and made my 15-year-old wannabe intellectual self feel smart and sophisticated. Major crush on author ensued. Only later discovered that the author had been OLD since the early 70s. Sadness. Still, a book for making you feel smart. Maybe I'd have something more substantial to say if I actually WAS smart.more
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