This title is not available in our membership service

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible.

Request Title

The New York Times best selling book that takes you inside SEAL Team Six – the covert squad that killed Osama Bin Laden

SEAL Team Six is a secret unit tasked with counterterrorism, hostage rescue, and counterinsurgency. In this dramatic, behind-the-scenes chronicle, Howard Wasdin takes readers deep inside the world of Navy SEALS and Special Forces snipers, beginning with the grueling selection process of Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S)—the toughest and longest military training in the world.

After graduating, Wasdin faced new challenges. First there was combat in Operation Desert Storm as a member of SEAL Team Two. Then the Green Course: the selection process to join the legendary SEAL Team Six, with a curriculum that included practiced land warfare to unarmed combat. More than learning how to pick a lock, they learned how to blow the door off its hinges. Finally as a member of SEAL Team Six he graduated from the most storied and challenging sniper program in the country: The Marine's Scout Sniper School. Eventually, of the 18 snipers in SEAL Team Six, Wasdin became the best—which meant one of the best snipers on the planet.

Less than half a year after sniper school, he was fighting for his life. The mission: capture or kill Somalian warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid. From rooftops, helicopters and alleys, Wasdin hunted Aidid and killed his men whenever possible. But everything went quickly to hell when his small band of soldiers found themselves fighting for their lives, cut off from help, and desperately trying to rescue downed comrades during a routine mission. The Battle of Mogadishu, as it become known, left 18 American soldiers dead and 73 wounded. Howard Wasdin had both of his legs nearly blown off while engaging the enemy. His dramatic combat tales combined with inside details of becoming one of the world's deadliest snipers make this one of the most explosive military memoirs in years.

Published: Macmillan Publishers on
ISBN: 9781429996525
List price: $9.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Very interesting. Full of information and action. The book gives you and idea of what it takes to be a special forces member. A great deal of work, effort and determinations.more
I found this a very interesting book. Navy Seals are the elite warriors of the Navy but if you want the best of the best then you get Seal Team 6. This is the story of Howard Wadin who became a member of the unbelievable military team. The process to get on this team is incredible and nearly impossible. Wadin gives his life story, his journey to get on the team and incredible battle stories. Seal Team 6 is the team that killed Osama Bin Laden. I can't imagine a tougher man than Wasdin. A really great story.more
In this reflection on becoming one of the world’s deadliest sniper assassins, U.S. Navy SEAL Howard Wasdin describes his personal background, his SEAL training, and his harrowing military missions. Despite having the knowledge and skills to efficiently kill, his heart and morality repeatedly show up in this story. He’s a role model for other American soldiers.more
Seal team six was one of the best books i have read in my entire life. I f i could give this book more than five stars i would. i usually dont read memoirs but this had an interesting topic so i read it.As i said before i dont ussually read memoirs because i dont like them. this book however took me out of my dislike of memiors and made the book awsome.his increadable story of how he grew up and how he became a navy seal was just amazing.there was nothing wrong with this book.the auther did anawsome job writing it and kepping me interested.i loved this book and i hope anyone who loves to read will read this book.more
It probably wasn't fair to Wasdin that I read this book right after I finished reading Krakauer's book on Pat Tillman. Krakauer is a great writer trying to tell the story about a good soldier. Wasdin is a great soldier trying to figure out what it takes to be a good writer. The other unfortunate comparison is to Bowden's Black Hawk Down. A big chunk of Seal Team Six covers Wasdin's time in Magadishu and his involvement in the same battle described in that book. It's tough to put yourself against such a well-written book.Wasdin is a warrior, highly trained and highly skilled to kill bad guys. That earns him an extra star. I'm sure he has many great stories to tell about his time in service, but probably can't or won't share them with the public.more
SEAL Team Six made headlines recently when they killed the world's most wanted man, Osama bin Laden, in Pakistan. Everyone wanted to know more about this elite team of the miltary's best men, and luckily former team member Howard E. Wasdin, along with Stephen Templin, had written SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper.The book succeeds because it shares Wasdin's personal story, from his difficult childhood with a stepfather who beat him frequently to his success as a sniper, moving quickly up the ranks in the Navy SEALs. Wasdin tells the story of his stepfather forcing him to pick up all the pecans that fell to the ground from a tree in their yard. If his stepfather came home and found just one pecan on the ground, Wasdin would be beaten. (Never mind that the pecan could have fallen just before he came home.)From this, Wasdin learned to be thorough and that no excuses would be sufficient. He believes that this upbringing helped prepare him for the rigors and challenges of Navy and SEAL training. This insight brought to mind Jeannette Walls' memoir, The Glass Castle. She had a difficult upbringing with parents who did not know how to raise children, yet she survived and became successful in spite of the way she was raised. The resilience of the human spirit always amazes me.Wasdin brings the reader right into the middle of his training, which is fascinating. The trials that these men undergo is unbelievable, and many do not make it through. His story of medical training on goats under simulated battle conditions was incredible.During his time with the SEALS, Wasdin served in Iraq during Desert Storm. When 14 starving Iraqi soldiers surrendered to him and his partner, he had a revelation."They were human beings, just like me. I discovered my humanity and the humanity in others. It was a turing point for me- it was when I matured." Wasdin also served in Somalia, and was involved in the Battle of Mogadishu, which was made into the book and movie, Black Hawk Down. His description of his role in the pursuit of warlord Aidid and that battle are tense and made me hold my breath as I read it. Wasdin was seriously injured in that battle.His most successful operation in Somalia involved saving a young boy. Next door to the house they were using as a secret base was a young boy who had stepped on a land mine and had a bad case of gangrene. The smell was awful and after being refused permission to help the boy and endangering their operation, Wasdin and his partner broke into the house next door, tied up the family, cleaned the boy's wound and gave him IV antibiotics.They returned two more times to help the boy and save his life. The once frightened, now thankful, family offered them tea on their last visit. He could not let that boy suffer needlessly.Seen from his perspective, Wasdin was very angry at the politics that he felt exacerbated the Somalia situation. He has some very harsh words for upper command and the Clinton administration. He believes that Aidid could have been captured, they had him sighted, but the plug was pulled.Wasdin's words on Somalia echo our current situation in Afghanistan."We shouldn't have become involved in Somalia's civil war- this was their problem, not ours- but once we committed, we should've finished what we started ; a lesson we are required to keep relearning over and over again."SEAL Team Six will appeal to many readers; those who like military books will appreciate the in-depth look at SEAL training, and those who like a more personal story will enjoy reading Wasdin's journey from small town Southern boy to Navy SEAL to badly injured soldier to the man he is today.more
Great discussion of ST6 training and a few operations from a very personal perspective. Enjoyed itmore
Read all 8 reviews

Reviews

Very interesting. Full of information and action. The book gives you and idea of what it takes to be a special forces member. A great deal of work, effort and determinations.more
I found this a very interesting book. Navy Seals are the elite warriors of the Navy but if you want the best of the best then you get Seal Team 6. This is the story of Howard Wadin who became a member of the unbelievable military team. The process to get on this team is incredible and nearly impossible. Wadin gives his life story, his journey to get on the team and incredible battle stories. Seal Team 6 is the team that killed Osama Bin Laden. I can't imagine a tougher man than Wasdin. A really great story.more
In this reflection on becoming one of the world’s deadliest sniper assassins, U.S. Navy SEAL Howard Wasdin describes his personal background, his SEAL training, and his harrowing military missions. Despite having the knowledge and skills to efficiently kill, his heart and morality repeatedly show up in this story. He’s a role model for other American soldiers.more
Seal team six was one of the best books i have read in my entire life. I f i could give this book more than five stars i would. i usually dont read memoirs but this had an interesting topic so i read it.As i said before i dont ussually read memoirs because i dont like them. this book however took me out of my dislike of memiors and made the book awsome.his increadable story of how he grew up and how he became a navy seal was just amazing.there was nothing wrong with this book.the auther did anawsome job writing it and kepping me interested.i loved this book and i hope anyone who loves to read will read this book.more
It probably wasn't fair to Wasdin that I read this book right after I finished reading Krakauer's book on Pat Tillman. Krakauer is a great writer trying to tell the story about a good soldier. Wasdin is a great soldier trying to figure out what it takes to be a good writer. The other unfortunate comparison is to Bowden's Black Hawk Down. A big chunk of Seal Team Six covers Wasdin's time in Magadishu and his involvement in the same battle described in that book. It's tough to put yourself against such a well-written book.Wasdin is a warrior, highly trained and highly skilled to kill bad guys. That earns him an extra star. I'm sure he has many great stories to tell about his time in service, but probably can't or won't share them with the public.more
SEAL Team Six made headlines recently when they killed the world's most wanted man, Osama bin Laden, in Pakistan. Everyone wanted to know more about this elite team of the miltary's best men, and luckily former team member Howard E. Wasdin, along with Stephen Templin, had written SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper.The book succeeds because it shares Wasdin's personal story, from his difficult childhood with a stepfather who beat him frequently to his success as a sniper, moving quickly up the ranks in the Navy SEALs. Wasdin tells the story of his stepfather forcing him to pick up all the pecans that fell to the ground from a tree in their yard. If his stepfather came home and found just one pecan on the ground, Wasdin would be beaten. (Never mind that the pecan could have fallen just before he came home.)From this, Wasdin learned to be thorough and that no excuses would be sufficient. He believes that this upbringing helped prepare him for the rigors and challenges of Navy and SEAL training. This insight brought to mind Jeannette Walls' memoir, The Glass Castle. She had a difficult upbringing with parents who did not know how to raise children, yet she survived and became successful in spite of the way she was raised. The resilience of the human spirit always amazes me.Wasdin brings the reader right into the middle of his training, which is fascinating. The trials that these men undergo is unbelievable, and many do not make it through. His story of medical training on goats under simulated battle conditions was incredible.During his time with the SEALS, Wasdin served in Iraq during Desert Storm. When 14 starving Iraqi soldiers surrendered to him and his partner, he had a revelation."They were human beings, just like me. I discovered my humanity and the humanity in others. It was a turing point for me- it was when I matured." Wasdin also served in Somalia, and was involved in the Battle of Mogadishu, which was made into the book and movie, Black Hawk Down. His description of his role in the pursuit of warlord Aidid and that battle are tense and made me hold my breath as I read it. Wasdin was seriously injured in that battle.His most successful operation in Somalia involved saving a young boy. Next door to the house they were using as a secret base was a young boy who had stepped on a land mine and had a bad case of gangrene. The smell was awful and after being refused permission to help the boy and endangering their operation, Wasdin and his partner broke into the house next door, tied up the family, cleaned the boy's wound and gave him IV antibiotics.They returned two more times to help the boy and save his life. The once frightened, now thankful, family offered them tea on their last visit. He could not let that boy suffer needlessly.Seen from his perspective, Wasdin was very angry at the politics that he felt exacerbated the Somalia situation. He has some very harsh words for upper command and the Clinton administration. He believes that Aidid could have been captured, they had him sighted, but the plug was pulled.Wasdin's words on Somalia echo our current situation in Afghanistan."We shouldn't have become involved in Somalia's civil war- this was their problem, not ours- but once we committed, we should've finished what we started ; a lesson we are required to keep relearning over and over again."SEAL Team Six will appeal to many readers; those who like military books will appreciate the in-depth look at SEAL training, and those who like a more personal story will enjoy reading Wasdin's journey from small town Southern boy to Navy SEAL to badly injured soldier to the man he is today.more
Great discussion of ST6 training and a few operations from a very personal perspective. Enjoyed itmore
Load more
scribd