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Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title--offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.

This edition of The Time Machine includes an Introduction, Biographical Note, and Afterword by James Gunn.

The time? 802,701 A.D.

The place? An Earth stranger than you can imagine.

The people? A pretty, childlike race, the Eloi-and their distant cousins, the Morlocks: disgusting, hairy creatures who live in caves and feed on the flesh of-what?

Enter the Time Traveller, who has hurtled almost a million years into the future. After the Morlocks steal his machine he may be trapped there...and at their mercy.

Published: Macmillan Publishers on Apr 1, 2007
ISBN: 9781429915250
List price: $3.99
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Mr. Wells, again, writes a fabulous tale. He manages to create a robust character, who turns out to be more introspective than most when faced with cannibals, from a man traveling through Time and recounting his adventure at a dinner party. It's a lovely book, full of sound speculation, most of which could be true. The way the Time Travelers different hypotheses change as he is confronted with more facts is a great window into reason; the facts with which he is confronted are a testament to Mr. Wells imagination. This book is tight and thoughtful.read more
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After settling in with The Time Machine, I soon realized I didn’t really remember much about this book. Or, at least my memories were fuzzy. I decided about half way through that I had a very big dislike of the Time Traveller. He was arrogant, uncaring, and prejudice. I get the arrogance, he wouldn’t have invented time travel without it, but the rest I could have done without.We begin with a lecture of sorts where the Time Traveller shows his guests a small device that he claims can travel in time. He also claims to have built a larger functioning device that he plans to use to travel in time. Which he apparently does, meeting with two vastly different groups of humans --- the Eloi and the Morlocks. The Eloi are a group of people so simple that he can’t believe this is what has become of the human race. In this same time, he also comes in contact with the Morlocks; a species that lives underground in dark tunnels. He does his best to categorize the humans he’s met but is disgusted when he figures out the relationship between the Eloi and Morlocks. When he’s able to escape and travels to his own place in time, he regales his contemporaries with stories of his travels.There are so many fascinating aspects to this story. Time travel! But, Wells drove me crazy with his ideas of the human race. The pervasive idea that the Time Traveller was so much smarter, better shall we say, than the people he encountered was repulsive. It ruined this book for me. I can dislike a character and still enjoy a book but not in this case. I tried to become fascinated by the time travel but I was too far gone to get any enjoyment out of it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Like the other H.G. Wells novels I have reread recently, this one surprised me by being darker and less romantic than I remembered. Much filmed, "The Time Machine" has no love story, in fact. Nor much action. What it has is an expansive, if dark, vision of the future.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Mr. Wells, again, writes a fabulous tale. He manages to create a robust character, who turns out to be more introspective than most when faced with cannibals, from a man traveling through Time and recounting his adventure at a dinner party. It's a lovely book, full of sound speculation, most of which could be true. The way the Time Travelers different hypotheses change as he is confronted with more facts is a great window into reason; the facts with which he is confronted are a testament to Mr. Wells imagination. This book is tight and thoughtful.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After settling in with The Time Machine, I soon realized I didn’t really remember much about this book. Or, at least my memories were fuzzy. I decided about half way through that I had a very big dislike of the Time Traveller. He was arrogant, uncaring, and prejudice. I get the arrogance, he wouldn’t have invented time travel without it, but the rest I could have done without.We begin with a lecture of sorts where the Time Traveller shows his guests a small device that he claims can travel in time. He also claims to have built a larger functioning device that he plans to use to travel in time. Which he apparently does, meeting with two vastly different groups of humans --- the Eloi and the Morlocks. The Eloi are a group of people so simple that he can’t believe this is what has become of the human race. In this same time, he also comes in contact with the Morlocks; a species that lives underground in dark tunnels. He does his best to categorize the humans he’s met but is disgusted when he figures out the relationship between the Eloi and Morlocks. When he’s able to escape and travels to his own place in time, he regales his contemporaries with stories of his travels.There are so many fascinating aspects to this story. Time travel! But, Wells drove me crazy with his ideas of the human race. The pervasive idea that the Time Traveller was so much smarter, better shall we say, than the people he encountered was repulsive. It ruined this book for me. I can dislike a character and still enjoy a book but not in this case. I tried to become fascinated by the time travel but I was too far gone to get any enjoyment out of it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Like the other H.G. Wells novels I have reread recently, this one surprised me by being darker and less romantic than I remembered. Much filmed, "The Time Machine" has no love story, in fact. Nor much action. What it has is an expansive, if dark, vision of the future.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The story is the account of an unidentified narrator relaying what was told to him by The Time Traveller. After having created a machine to travel forward in time, the Traveller returns to tell his friends of the society he encountered.Man has evolved into two species. The Eloi, described as beautiful, playful, small people, live above ground in what appears to be a utopian society. The Morlocks are an albino, half-man, half-ape species that lives underground. Over his time with the Eloi, the Traveller develops the theory that the Eloi are the noble, ruling class. All goods are made by the Morlocks and the Eloi simply fill their days with play and eating. The Traveller later learns the ugly truth that the Eloi are actually the bred food source for the Morlocks.This was a super-quick read. However, Wells managed to pack in a lot of detail into a small space. He was very descriptive with an economy of words. The relationship of the two races makes an interesting social commentary about the working class and elites. I'm not familiar with politics of the late 1800s, but it's definitely something for consideration today.
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Rather blah, really. I can imagine how, in its time, this was a remarkable book; however, it's not a very good story. I liked 'Island of Dr. Moreau' better.
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This book has many layers that perhaps reflected the authors vision of society. His political vision of the different isms of the time such as capitalism, socialism, marxism is reflected in the 2 societies of the future as well as the characters who attend the dinner party and who are told the scientists story with a high level of disbelief. On one level we have the morlocks and eloi representing good and bad, on another level they can represent proleteriat vs capitalist with the eloi representing the idle capitalist who does not contribute to society.The author through the scientist looks down on the eloi as good for nothing hedonists and is scared of the morlocks as if they represent the unseen, misunderstood, uneducated, low echelons of Victorian society.The ultimate demise of the world as we know it although disappointing seems a stark warning to contemporary society.By choosing to represent the far-distant future the author very cleverly avoids verification. Now are we asking for the same proof in our time?
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