This title isn’t available with your membership

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible. If you’d like to read it immediately, you can purchase this title individually.

Request Title

Imaginary friend Budo narrates this heartwarming story of love, loyalty, and the power of the imagination--the perfect read for anyone who has ever had a friend . . . real or otherwise

Budo is lucky as imaginary friends go. He's been alive for more than five years, which is positively ancient in the world of imaginary friends. But Budo feels his age, and thinks constantly of the day when eight-year-old Max Delaney will stop believing in him. When that happens, Budo will disappear.

Max is different from other children. Some people say that he has Asperger's Syndrome, but most just say he's "on the spectrum." None of this matters to Budo, who loves Max and is charged with protecting him from the class bully, from awkward situations in the cafeteria, and even in the bathroom stalls. But he can't protect Max from Mrs. Patterson, the woman who works with Max in the Learning Center and who believes that she alone is qualified to care for this young boy.

When Mrs. Patterson does the unthinkable and kidnaps Max, it is up to Budo and a team of imaginary friends to save him--and Budo must ultimately decide which is more important: Max's happiness or Budo's very existence.

Narrated by Budo, a character with a unique ability to have a foot in many worlds--imaginary, real, child, and adult-- Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend touches on the truths of life, love, and friendship as it races to a heartwarming . . . and heartbreaking conclusion.

Published: Macmillan Publishers on Aug 21, 2012
ISBN: 9781250024008
List price: $2.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend: A Novel
Available as a separate purchase
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

Every once in a while, a book that falls outside of my normal reading choices will catch my eye - something about the description or perhaps the cover. Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks was one of those books. Did you have an imaginary friend when you were younger? Perhaps you still do. Maybe your child does. Max Delaney is eight years old and he is 'different' than the other children in his class. Although his father denies it, his mother has accepted that Max has Asperger's - a form of autism. Max has an imaginary friend named Budo who has been around for quite a long time now - five years. That's a long time in the world of imaginary friends. But Budo is worried - if Max stops believing in Budo, then he will he disappear? But then the unthinkable happens - it is Max who disappears - taken by someone who wants Max as their own child. And the only person who knows where Max is? Budo. But what can he do? He's only a figment of Max's imagination. Or is he..... What an utterly unique and captivating book this was! I chose to listen to Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend. and was glad I did. Some books are just better in audio format. This was especially true for this book. The reader was Matthew Brown and his voice was perfect. Budo is the narrator of this story and Brown was able to portray the innocence of Budo in his diction and tone, infusing his voice with much emotion and wonder. Truly, Budo came alive in Brown's reading. He adapted different voices for each of the characters, providing me with a strong mental image of every player. I did find the first disc to be a bit slow, as Budo's narrative seemed repetitive and overly basic. But, then I thought about it and realized that Budo is a product of Max's mind. And Max "lives his life mostly inside himself." Upon reflection, the account seemed in keeping with the way Max thinks. By the second disc, I was hooked. I wanted to know more about Budo, his world and the other friends he meets and knows. Max's story takes a bad turn and by then, there was no turning back. I was quite upset to have arrived at work already. (I listen to books on CD back and forth every day) The whole imaginary friend idea really makes you stop and think. Children employ them for various reasons and I found the inclusion of an adult imaginary friend quite intriguing. Dicks has done a bang up job of creating wonderful characters, a heartbreaking and heartwarming tale and spinning it into one of the most unique tales I've experienced in a long time. I think you're either going to love it or leave it. This reader loved it. It somewhat reminded me of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved this book from start to finish! Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend was different from any book I've ever read before, although the overall "voice" or feel of the book was similar to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, which is an all-time favorite of mine. Budo, the imaginary friend created by young Max, pulled me into the story from page one. As the narrator, Budo held my interest, made me laugh, and kept me guessing all the way to the fabulous end. I smiled and nodded my head as he described his human friend Max's unique personality. Max lives with an unnamed diagnosis (my conclusion was high-functioning autism or Aspergers). Budo's perspective allows him a fascinating insight to Max that others don't have -- if you have a friend or family member with a similar diagnosis, Budo may give you a glimpse into their world. At any rate, Memoirs is well-written and was a real joy to read. It was thoughtful, humorous, and suspenseful. I will be checking out more titles from this author!Please note that while I did receive a complimentary advance copy of this book, it did not influence my review. Thank you.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend" by Matthew Dicks gives us the inside scoop from the perspective of an imaginary friend. Budo is Max's imaginary friend and he is different from other imaginary friends because he has been around for more than 5 years. Although not stated in the book, Max appears to be on the autism spectrum. Budo is his only friend. This book isn't only about Max, though. Budo takes into the realm of imaginary friends (and how they are real!) and we get to meet several throughout the book. Mr. Dicks does through some excitement and tension throughout the book, especially with a teacher who is planning something devious for Max. I really liked this book. It held my attention from start to finish. Budo is an excellent spokesperson for imaginary people. I also like that Max is on the autism spectrum, so we get a peak inside his world too.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Every once in a while, a book that falls outside of my normal reading choices will catch my eye - something about the description or perhaps the cover. Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks was one of those books. Did you have an imaginary friend when you were younger? Perhaps you still do. Maybe your child does. Max Delaney is eight years old and he is 'different' than the other children in his class. Although his father denies it, his mother has accepted that Max has Asperger's - a form of autism. Max has an imaginary friend named Budo who has been around for quite a long time now - five years. That's a long time in the world of imaginary friends. But Budo is worried - if Max stops believing in Budo, then he will he disappear? But then the unthinkable happens - it is Max who disappears - taken by someone who wants Max as their own child. And the only person who knows where Max is? Budo. But what can he do? He's only a figment of Max's imagination. Or is he..... What an utterly unique and captivating book this was! I chose to listen to Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend. and was glad I did. Some books are just better in audio format. This was especially true for this book. The reader was Matthew Brown and his voice was perfect. Budo is the narrator of this story and Brown was able to portray the innocence of Budo in his diction and tone, infusing his voice with much emotion and wonder. Truly, Budo came alive in Brown's reading. He adapted different voices for each of the characters, providing me with a strong mental image of every player. I did find the first disc to be a bit slow, as Budo's narrative seemed repetitive and overly basic. But, then I thought about it and realized that Budo is a product of Max's mind. And Max "lives his life mostly inside himself." Upon reflection, the account seemed in keeping with the way Max thinks. By the second disc, I was hooked. I wanted to know more about Budo, his world and the other friends he meets and knows. Max's story takes a bad turn and by then, there was no turning back. I was quite upset to have arrived at work already. (I listen to books on CD back and forth every day) The whole imaginary friend idea really makes you stop and think. Children employ them for various reasons and I found the inclusion of an adult imaginary friend quite intriguing. Dicks has done a bang up job of creating wonderful characters, a heartbreaking and heartwarming tale and spinning it into one of the most unique tales I've experienced in a long time. I think you're either going to love it or leave it. This reader loved it. It somewhat reminded me of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved this book from start to finish! Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend was different from any book I've ever read before, although the overall "voice" or feel of the book was similar to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, which is an all-time favorite of mine. Budo, the imaginary friend created by young Max, pulled me into the story from page one. As the narrator, Budo held my interest, made me laugh, and kept me guessing all the way to the fabulous end. I smiled and nodded my head as he described his human friend Max's unique personality. Max lives with an unnamed diagnosis (my conclusion was high-functioning autism or Aspergers). Budo's perspective allows him a fascinating insight to Max that others don't have -- if you have a friend or family member with a similar diagnosis, Budo may give you a glimpse into their world. At any rate, Memoirs is well-written and was a real joy to read. It was thoughtful, humorous, and suspenseful. I will be checking out more titles from this author!Please note that while I did receive a complimentary advance copy of this book, it did not influence my review. Thank you.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend" by Matthew Dicks gives us the inside scoop from the perspective of an imaginary friend. Budo is Max's imaginary friend and he is different from other imaginary friends because he has been around for more than 5 years. Although not stated in the book, Max appears to be on the autism spectrum. Budo is his only friend. This book isn't only about Max, though. Budo takes into the realm of imaginary friends (and how they are real!) and we get to meet several throughout the book. Mr. Dicks does through some excitement and tension throughout the book, especially with a teacher who is planning something devious for Max. I really liked this book. It held my attention from start to finish. Budo is an excellent spokesperson for imaginary people. I also like that Max is on the autism spectrum, so we get a peak inside his world too.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Budo is a delight. I enjoyed the idea of there being a connected world where imaginary friends can talk with one another and share experiences. I appreciated the fear Budo felt about what it means to not exist and his struggle to do the right thing even when it meant his own peril.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very unusual. Budo, the imaginary friend of Max, must find a way to save Max, who has Aspergers, when he is in danger. Quite a feat, rwquiring assistance from his team of imaginary friends.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Budo is an imaginary friend. As imaginary friends go, he is pretty lucky. The boy who imagined him, Max, has a great imagination. Unlike some imaginary friends, who are two-dimensional or unable to walk, Budo looks remarkably like a real boy. He can walk through doors, which gives him the freedom to visit the local gas station and hospital, and he doesn't need sleep, which has allowed him to learn lots of things while his friend Max sleeps. Budo has also had a remarkably long life for an imaginary friend. Imaginary friends disappear when kids stop believing in them, but Max is a special boy (perhaps somewhere on the autism spectrum) and so he has continued to believe in Budo long after other kids have moved on from their imaginary friends. Part of the charm of this book is the detail with which Dicks describes the world of imaginary friends. Seeing our world through the eyes of imaginary friends, even one as wise as Budo, is an interesting perspective. But Dicks moves beyond descripting, propelling the story forward when something terrible happens to Max. I don't want to say too much here, but this challenge forces both Budo and Max to grow and irreparably impacts them both. The relationship between Budo and Max is tender and real, even as it grows and changes. Although Budo is imaginary, Budo's love for Max is so real that I had tears streaming down my face by the end of the book. This is a touching story, and I think that both Budo and Max will stay with me for a long time. I also have to mention that although Max and Budo are the focus of the story, there are some strong supporting characters as well, and foremost among them is Max's teacher, Mrs. Gosk. Mrs. Gosk is the kind of teacher kids love. She doesn't stand for any nonsense. She talks to the kids like they are real people. And she truly cares for them. She is such a great character that I wasn't surprised to learn that Dicks himself is an elementary teacher and that Mrs. Gosk is based on a real life teacher named Donna. In the Acknowledgements, Dicks says, "My desire was to give Max and Budo the best possible teacher, and I quickly realized that reality had provided me with a character much greater than any I could have ever imagined."
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd