Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

With Reporting and Analysis by the New York Times

What happened on 9/11 and how? Have we learned any lessons? Are we safer now?

The questions every American wants answered.

Since September 11, 2001, Americans have wondered how the tragic events of that day could have occurred. This is the complete report of the circumstances surrounding the attacts, including:

*Al Qaeda and the organization of the 9/11 attack
*Intelligence collection, analysis, and management
*International counterterrorism policy
*The inner workings of terrorist financing
*The security of American borders
*Law enforcement inside the U.S.
*Commercial aviation and transportation safety
* Personal interviews with Presidents Clinton and Bush on their roles

Supplemented with analysis and reporting by The New York Times, this edition of The 9/11 Report also makes recommendations as to how to prevent terrorist attacks in the future.

Published: Macmillan Publishers on
ISBN: 9781429957465
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The 9/11 Report by The National Commission on Terrorist A...
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
It may be unusual that commission reports are readable, but this one is quite well-written and well-structured. I find the last chapters with recommendations for reorganization of the governments security efforts should have been left out and put somewhere else. In the version I have there is annoyingly no index.I find two major omissions: The engineering report on the structural capability of the World Trade Center. As far as I remember this was intentional left out to a separate later report as the enginering modeling took long time. The other omission is the issue with the interrogation of detainees which may have involved torture. The commission report gets away with this issue by writing on page 146: "Our access to them has been limited to the review of intelligence reports based on communications received from the locations where the actual interrogations take place. [...] Nor were we allowed to talk to the interrogators so that we could better judge the credibility of the detainees and clarify ambiguities in the reporting. We were told that our requests might disrupt the sensitive interrogation process". One may wonder what the "sensitive interrogation process" entails...more
September 11, 2011, marks the ten-year anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. In November 2002, a bipartisan commission was tasked to examine the facts of the attacks. Unlike other government documents that I've read over the years, this book is very readable, although detailed. It includes a timeline of the attacks, biographies of the terrorists, and a brief history of the Middle East.more
Scary. Infuriating. Hilarious. The 9/11 Report methodically demonstrates that U.S. preparedness was not the fault of any one particular official but the result of institutionalized laxity and bureaucratic cautiousness. The report points out figures that will make your head spin:Even in 2002, the number of U.S. Arabic degrees awarded was six.U.S. air strikes on al Qaeda flew over Pakistan, which had to be informed each time. Pakistan's ISI then warned Bin Laden, who quickly evacuated.Zakariya Essabar's own parents thought he was too religious.The only real security layers between the terrorists and their objectives were visa application forms and airport metal detectors.The FBI, CIA, and NSA were reluctant to share FISA information, underestimating their own legal abilities.Airport security screening, CAPPS, simply required that suspected luggage be held off a plane until the passenger boarded.more
Read all 13 reviews

Reviews

It may be unusual that commission reports are readable, but this one is quite well-written and well-structured. I find the last chapters with recommendations for reorganization of the governments security efforts should have been left out and put somewhere else. In the version I have there is annoyingly no index.I find two major omissions: The engineering report on the structural capability of the World Trade Center. As far as I remember this was intentional left out to a separate later report as the enginering modeling took long time. The other omission is the issue with the interrogation of detainees which may have involved torture. The commission report gets away with this issue by writing on page 146: "Our access to them has been limited to the review of intelligence reports based on communications received from the locations where the actual interrogations take place. [...] Nor were we allowed to talk to the interrogators so that we could better judge the credibility of the detainees and clarify ambiguities in the reporting. We were told that our requests might disrupt the sensitive interrogation process". One may wonder what the "sensitive interrogation process" entails...more
September 11, 2011, marks the ten-year anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. In November 2002, a bipartisan commission was tasked to examine the facts of the attacks. Unlike other government documents that I've read over the years, this book is very readable, although detailed. It includes a timeline of the attacks, biographies of the terrorists, and a brief history of the Middle East.more
Scary. Infuriating. Hilarious. The 9/11 Report methodically demonstrates that U.S. preparedness was not the fault of any one particular official but the result of institutionalized laxity and bureaucratic cautiousness. The report points out figures that will make your head spin:Even in 2002, the number of U.S. Arabic degrees awarded was six.U.S. air strikes on al Qaeda flew over Pakistan, which had to be informed each time. Pakistan's ISI then warned Bin Laden, who quickly evacuated.Zakariya Essabar's own parents thought he was too religious.The only real security layers between the terrorists and their objectives were visa application forms and airport metal detectors.The FBI, CIA, and NSA were reluctant to share FISA information, underestimating their own legal abilities.Airport security screening, CAPPS, simply required that suspected luggage be held off a plane until the passenger boarded.more
This is the "official" report of what happend on 9/11. It is a very dry read. The highlight is the narritive about the day. There were a lot of problems with comunication that day but this report does not give concrete ways to prevent this tragedy from happening again.more
Load more
scribd