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In the vast dominion of Seven Cities, in the Holy Desert Raraku, the seer Sha'ik and her followers prepare for the long-prophesied uprising known as the Whirlwind. Unprecedented in size and savagery, this maelstrom of fanaticism and bloodlust will embroil the Malazan Empire in one of the bloodiest conflicts it has ever known, shaping destinies and giving birth to legends . . .
Set in a brilliantly realized world ravaged by dark, uncontrollable magic, this thrilling novel of war, intrigue and betrayal confirms Steven Eirkson as a storyteller of breathtaking skill, imagination and originality--a new master of epic fantasy.

Published: Macmillan Publishers on
ISBN: 9781429926492
List price: $9.99
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Availability for Deadhouse Gates: Book Two of The Malazan Book of the Fallen
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Not sure I like this series...it is a lot of work to read, but heading now for book 3 so we will see how that one goes...
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I really enjoyed Deadhouse Gates even though at times it was a little slow. It, along with the third book, Memories of Ice, serve as a great bridge into the later books. I highly recommend itmore
Deadhouse Gates is stunning - and not just as a blunt weapon. It takes the worldbuilding done in the first book, introduces mostly new characters and situations, and proceeds to lay out some of the most emotionally wrenching scenes I've ever encountered in a fantasy novel - or any novel, for that matter. The worldbuilding never stops, and a good chunk of the thousand pages is setup for the volumes to come, but the Chain of Dogs alone is worth reading the book for - not to mention Icarium and Mappo, the most touching and tragic star-crossed friends ever written, and the nearly unbearable fall of Felisin.

My hazy memories suggest that none of the later volumes ever top this one; even if so, that leaves a lot of room for excellent work.more
"Keep reading, try book two," they said. "It gets easier!" Pffft.I read The Gardens of the Moon carefully, knowing its reputation for being thorny. The end result was rewarding. I must have let my mental concentration lapse sometime during the second book because it was full of moments when I had to try to remember exactly who that guy was and why his tattoos were changing colour!The fault, however, is all mine. Though bleak at times, Deadhouse Gates is an engaging work of fantasy. Nothing fits into nice neat boxes. Just when you think you understand some idea, conventional wisdom is pushed aside for something deeper.The bleak tone of the book did weigh on me at times. There is so much war and suffering that it can be difficult to read. It has certainly spurred my convictions on the pointlessness of war with all the human suffering it brings.So if you've read book one, read book two—carefully. When I move on to Memories of Ice, I'm going to set aside a few weeks and read a chapter per night—Erikson rewards a close reading.more
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Reviews

Not sure I like this series...it is a lot of work to read, but heading now for book 3 so we will see how that one goes...
more
I really enjoyed Deadhouse Gates even though at times it was a little slow. It, along with the third book, Memories of Ice, serve as a great bridge into the later books. I highly recommend itmore
Deadhouse Gates is stunning - and not just as a blunt weapon. It takes the worldbuilding done in the first book, introduces mostly new characters and situations, and proceeds to lay out some of the most emotionally wrenching scenes I've ever encountered in a fantasy novel - or any novel, for that matter. The worldbuilding never stops, and a good chunk of the thousand pages is setup for the volumes to come, but the Chain of Dogs alone is worth reading the book for - not to mention Icarium and Mappo, the most touching and tragic star-crossed friends ever written, and the nearly unbearable fall of Felisin.

My hazy memories suggest that none of the later volumes ever top this one; even if so, that leaves a lot of room for excellent work.more
"Keep reading, try book two," they said. "It gets easier!" Pffft.I read The Gardens of the Moon carefully, knowing its reputation for being thorny. The end result was rewarding. I must have let my mental concentration lapse sometime during the second book because it was full of moments when I had to try to remember exactly who that guy was and why his tattoos were changing colour!The fault, however, is all mine. Though bleak at times, Deadhouse Gates is an engaging work of fantasy. Nothing fits into nice neat boxes. Just when you think you understand some idea, conventional wisdom is pushed aside for something deeper.The bleak tone of the book did weigh on me at times. There is so much war and suffering that it can be difficult to read. It has certainly spurred my convictions on the pointlessness of war with all the human suffering it brings.So if you've read book one, read book two—carefully. When I move on to Memories of Ice, I'm going to set aside a few weeks and read a chapter per night—Erikson rewards a close reading.more
I am glad I didn’t give up on this series after my initial wave of vile feelings toward Gardens of the Moon. Wow, what a book! I’m spent! I’ve now learned that I need a few lighter reads in-between Erikson’s works. Please note that I try my hardest to write “spoiler free” reviews. I love comments on my blog – feedback is truly why I write reviews in the first place. Please make sure you don’t post spoilers in your comments or I won’t approve them.Deadhouse Gates read slower than most fantasy books that I’ve read, but I did not find this to be a bad thing. Instead of being bored, the author enthralled me with his imagery. Erikson’s rich vocabulary coupled with excellent sentence structure produced a work that borders on a poem. It took effort to see what lay beneath the paper and ink, but under that surface I found an entire ocean.The multiple plot-lines within Deadhouse Gates were vast and it was hard to tell which (if any) were central to the tale. That is a compliment as each of the plots were essential and they all came together neatly at various points within the story. There were several scenes that were downright genius. The one that comes immediately to my mind was a certain “promotion”. If and when you read Deadhouse Gates, you will know exactly what I am talking about.The characters within Deadhouse Gates were portrayed so much better than in Gardens of the Moon. There were a few characters I never got a good feel for and hence had no real interest in their sub-plot. However, most of the major characters had true depth. I learned in good detail their inner desires and internal conflicts through their outwardly acts and their inwardly introspections.I started to understand Erikson’s world better as I read Deadhouse Gates. This was something that had completely eluded me in Gardens of the Moon. The world within Deadhouse Gates was a very scary place. I would not want to live in Malaz. Battle scenes were vivid and brutal. Tortured warriors, dying men, and corpses of women and children lined roads that criss-crossed the entire map. The flies that came to feast on their blood were relentless in their pursuits.The ideas regarding “warrens” and how they exist were totally unique (for anything I’ve read at least). How everything in the world tied to various warrens, from magic and the gods to physical locations intrigued me. The magic systems within the world were mysterious too. Hints were made about how they worked, but like the rest of Erikson’s work, it seems it takes effort (and multiple volumes) to truly understand. The world building that took place to create the Malazan Empire and beyond was truly incredible and has resulted in a work of genius!Overall I give Deadhouse Gates 5 out of 5 stars. Much better than Gardens of the Moon at 2!more
Deadhouse Gates is the second book in Erikson's epic Malazan Book of the Fallen series. We pick up after Gardens of the Moon with an initially confusing tale a half a world away. At the end of book 1, there was worry about something called the Pannion Seer. This is not the Seer's story, which I believe happens in book 3. Instead this story follows a small group of characters that have traveled east across the sea to the Seven Cities with only a few hints to what's going on back on the other side of the world.The continent of the Seven Cities was one of the first conquered by the Empress and the Malazan Empire. This has not sat well with the natives. As the Empire has expanded and the Empress' attention is focused elsewhere, the natives rise up to overthrow the Malazan rule. At the heart of the revolution is the prophesied Whirlwind in the Holy Desert. We see all aspects of this bloody war along the way: hysterical fanatics; fleeing refugees and their protectors; uneasy alliances; the birth of legends.Like book 1, Deadhouse Gates follows a large cast of characters. There are a few familiar faces and even more new ones. The scope is vast. At any one time we're following up to six story threads in alternating sections. Sometimes all six in one chapter, sometimes only a couple. Erikson has an amazing talent for writing battles, right up there with George R. R. Martin and Tolkien. This book is a hard read but very rewarding once you reach the end.more
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