• book

From the Publisher

Over the past two decades, violent crime has become one of the most serious domestic problems in the United States. Approximately 13 million people (nearly 5% of the U.S. population) are victims of crime every year, and of that, approximately one and a half million are victims of violent crime. Ensuring quality of life for victims of crime is therefore a major challenge facing policy makers and mental health providers.

Helping Victims of Violent Crime grounds victim assistance treatments in a victim-centered and strengths perspective. The book explores victim assistance through systems theory: the holistic notion of examining the client in his/her environment and a key theoretical underpinning of social work practice.

The basic assumption of systems theoryis homeostasis. A crime event causes a change in homeostasis and often results in disequilibrium. The victim's focus at this point is to regain equilibrium. Under the systems metatheory, coping, crisis and attribution theories provide a good framework for victim-centered intervention. Stress and coping theories posit that three factors determine the state of balance: perception of the event, available situational support, and coping mechanisms.

Crisis theory offers a framework to understand a victim's response to a crime. The basic assumption of crisis theory asserts that when a crisis occurs, people respond with a fairly predictable physical and emotional pattern. The intensity and manifestation of this pattern may vary from individual to individual. Finally, attribution theory asserts that individuals make cognitive appraisals of a stressful situation in both positive and negative ways. These appraisals are based on the individual's assertion that they can understand, predict, and control circumstances and result in the victim's assignment of responsibility for solving or helping with problems that have arisen from the crime event.

In summary, these four theories can delineate a definitive model for approach to the victimization process. It is from this theoretical framework that Treating Victims of Violent Crime offers assessments and interventions with a fuller understanding of the victimization recovery process. The book includes analysis of victims of family violence (child abuse, elder abuse, partner violence) as well as stranger violence (sexual assault, homicide, and terrorism).

Published: Springer Publishing Company on
ISBN: 9780826125088
List price: $46.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Helping Victims of Violent Crime
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

A Plus
5 min read
Politics

Chicago’s Most Vulnerable Citizens Have A Voice Thanks To One Artist’s Embrace Of Art As Activism

Gang violence. Increased danger. Murder. These are just a few of the dark words that are currently so closely associated with Chicago. To say it's not true is a lie. If you're not living it, you're hearing stories or seeing it on the news — there's no way to block it out. Stories of innocent children killed in the line of gang fire, intended murder, and fatality numbers going up each weekend. This is the harsh reality. This, partnered with the racism and inequality that seems to be increasing across America, is reflecting hard on the diversity of Chicagoans. With a new administration creating
Global Voices
3 min read
Society

Kyrgyzstan Bolsters Protections Against Domestic Violence

Domestic violence. Wikimedia commons image. The following is a partner post from EurasiaNet.org written by Nurjamal Djanibekova. Republished with permission. Kyrgyzstan has in a landmark decision adopted legislation designed to provide greater protections for victims of domestic abuse. Kyrgyzstan already has laws in place criminalizing violence in the home, but the legislation approved by President Almazbek Atambayev on April 28 constitutes a substantial and important revision. One fresh provision will require police to respond to every reported instance of domestic violence. This means that a
Newsweek
4 min read
Society

Nipping Student Violence In The Bud

In 1998, 15-year-old Kip Kinkel murdered his parents at their home, then killed two students at his Oregon high school. In journal entries he wrote prior to the rampage, he expressed hatred for “every person on this earth.” Eric Hainstock, also 15, shot and killed his high school principal in Wisconsin in 2006. In letters from prison, he blamed the principal, his teachers and social services “for never listening to me.” And before 16-year-old Alex Hribal stabbed 20 students and a security guard with kitchen knives at his high school in Pennsylvania two years ago, he wrote a letter blaming h