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From the Publisher

In today’s interdependent world, teaching children to compete seems as “wise” as teaching one’s left hand to outsmart the right hand. The Psychology of the Integral Society outlines the principles of an eye-opening approach to education. No competition, rearing through social environment, peer equality, rewarding givers, and dynamic group makeup are some of the concepts introduced in this must-have book for all who wish to become better parents and better persons in today’s integrated society.
Published: anon_977788936 an imprint of NBN Books on
ISBN: 9781897448717
List price: $4.99
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