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How the world's leading innovators push their ideas to fruition again and again

Edison famously said that genius is 1 percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration. Ideas for new businesses, solutions to the world's problems, and artistic breakthroughs are common, but great execution is rare.

According to Scott Belsky, the capacity to make ideas happen can be developed by anyone willing to develop their organizational habits and leadership capability. That's why he founded Behance, a company that helps creative people and teams across industries develop these skills.

Belsky has spent six years studying the habits of creative people and teams that are especially productive-the ones who make their ideas happen time and time again. After interviewing hundreds of successful creatives, he has compiled their most powerful-and often counterintuitive-practices, such as:

•Generate ideas in moderation and kill ideas liberally
•Prioritize through nagging
•Encourage fighting within your team

While many of us obsess about discovering great new ideas, Belsky shows why it's better to develop the capacity to make ideas happen-a capacity that endures over time.
Published: Penguin Group on Apr 15, 2010
ISBN: 9781101404355
List price: $12.99
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I couldn't get through this book. It was half sales pitch for the Behance Action Method, half thinly-backed admonitions. It felt like I was reading a laundry list, a series of thought processes and planning tools I was supposed to somehow use in order to more capably translate my ideas into reality. A third of the way into it I gave up. There are plenty of good tidbits in the book, but many of them were contradictory, and the whole felt like less than the sum of the (many) parts.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book did not deliver on its title. Over half the book was advertising on his Action Method for getting organized. If you wanted to understand the Action Method I would recommend this book. Otherwise, it offered nothing new in how to make ideas happen.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Not the best business book I've read, but it had some pearls. Not a waste of time.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've been torn between giving this 1 or 2 stars, or 4 stars, so 3 it is. The good parts are fascinating, and I think potentially very useful to me in work and at home. Some smart techniques and interesting quotes. I may even recommend it to my colleagues.

On the other hand...it's hard for me to take seriously a book that uses "thought leader" non-ironically. And so it has a lot of that sort of thing going on: oh, look, there's Chris Anderson! Malcolm Gladwell! IDEO! etc., etc. And plenty of eye-rolling material for sure.

So if you can get past the eye-rolling, it's probably worth reading. Thankfully, it's pretty short. (I read it in an afternoon while sitting in the park.)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Although I liked the concept of the book, I felt the execution was very lacking. It felt a little immature and simplistic. Too many references to their proprietary action management system. Likewise, I am clearly biased toward GTD, but the suggested method seemed a bit simplistic.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Whilst there are probably better books writtennaboutvgettingborganised, I thought the premise of 'Makimg Ideas Happen' was a breakthrough - Belsky breaks it downnpretty clearly, that creativity without action is, pretty much close to useless. That there are millions of people wandering th world with great ideas, but pointless if they don't harness the discipline to execute them. I got a lot out if his book in terms of developing focus and not using 'but I'm creative, I hate operational work'. Lke all of these style of books, lots of it didn't appeal directly to me, but essentially only need one good idea to make it a worthwhile read, and this book had it for me.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"Making Ideas Happen" is Belsky's book-length primer on managing and executing ideas. There are three broad sections that center about best practices for "creatives": organization, community and leadership. The first section, on organization, is incredibly compelling: There's case studies and a solution (though the solution is his company's own Action Method). But then the subsequent two sections whimper away in comparison: Without the solution (i.e. his company has no product), it's simply a distillation of best practices. This isn't to say it doesn't have nuggets of truth and good reporting -- it just does not have the momentum of the first section.Having said that, Belsky does draw upon a wide range of interviews -- from Google creative leaders to Goldman Sachs managers, from young designers to established entrepreneurs. In doing so he makes the case for broadly defined group called the "creatives" that is deliciously ambiguous. Then again, his company promotes and facilitates for this group, so again, there's a self-promotional aspect embedded within.Read if: You're curious about the world of "creatives" and about the Behance Network's Action Method.Avoid if: You're looking for something with more tools and gritty details.Read also: Scott Berkun's Making Things Happen (formerly known as the Art of Project Management)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Una síntesis del buen project management. Principios clave: actions steps y follow upread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

I couldn't get through this book. It was half sales pitch for the Behance Action Method, half thinly-backed admonitions. It felt like I was reading a laundry list, a series of thought processes and planning tools I was supposed to somehow use in order to more capably translate my ideas into reality. A third of the way into it I gave up. There are plenty of good tidbits in the book, but many of them were contradictory, and the whole felt like less than the sum of the (many) parts.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book did not deliver on its title. Over half the book was advertising on his Action Method for getting organized. If you wanted to understand the Action Method I would recommend this book. Otherwise, it offered nothing new in how to make ideas happen.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Not the best business book I've read, but it had some pearls. Not a waste of time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've been torn between giving this 1 or 2 stars, or 4 stars, so 3 it is. The good parts are fascinating, and I think potentially very useful to me in work and at home. Some smart techniques and interesting quotes. I may even recommend it to my colleagues.

On the other hand...it's hard for me to take seriously a book that uses "thought leader" non-ironically. And so it has a lot of that sort of thing going on: oh, look, there's Chris Anderson! Malcolm Gladwell! IDEO! etc., etc. And plenty of eye-rolling material for sure.

So if you can get past the eye-rolling, it's probably worth reading. Thankfully, it's pretty short. (I read it in an afternoon while sitting in the park.)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Although I liked the concept of the book, I felt the execution was very lacking. It felt a little immature and simplistic. Too many references to their proprietary action management system. Likewise, I am clearly biased toward GTD, but the suggested method seemed a bit simplistic.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Whilst there are probably better books writtennaboutvgettingborganised, I thought the premise of 'Makimg Ideas Happen' was a breakthrough - Belsky breaks it downnpretty clearly, that creativity without action is, pretty much close to useless. That there are millions of people wandering th world with great ideas, but pointless if they don't harness the discipline to execute them. I got a lot out if his book in terms of developing focus and not using 'but I'm creative, I hate operational work'. Lke all of these style of books, lots of it didn't appeal directly to me, but essentially only need one good idea to make it a worthwhile read, and this book had it for me.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"Making Ideas Happen" is Belsky's book-length primer on managing and executing ideas. There are three broad sections that center about best practices for "creatives": organization, community and leadership. The first section, on organization, is incredibly compelling: There's case studies and a solution (though the solution is his company's own Action Method). But then the subsequent two sections whimper away in comparison: Without the solution (i.e. his company has no product), it's simply a distillation of best practices. This isn't to say it doesn't have nuggets of truth and good reporting -- it just does not have the momentum of the first section.Having said that, Belsky does draw upon a wide range of interviews -- from Google creative leaders to Goldman Sachs managers, from young designers to established entrepreneurs. In doing so he makes the case for broadly defined group called the "creatives" that is deliciously ambiguous. Then again, his company promotes and facilitates for this group, so again, there's a self-promotional aspect embedded within.Read if: You're curious about the world of "creatives" and about the Behance Network's Action Method.Avoid if: You're looking for something with more tools and gritty details.Read also: Scott Berkun's Making Things Happen (formerly known as the Art of Project Management)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Una síntesis del buen project management. Principios clave: actions steps y follow up
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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