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Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Díaz’s first book, Drown, established him as a major new writer with “the dispassionate eye of a journalist and the tongue of a poet” (Newsweek). His first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, was named #1 Fiction Book of the Year” by Time magazine and spent more than 100 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, establishing itself – with more than a million copies in print – as a modern classic. In addition to the Pulitzer, Díaz has won a host of major awards and prizes, including the National Book Critic’s Circle Award, the PEN/Malamud Award, the PEN/O. Henry Prize, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and the Anisfield-Wolf Award.

Now Díaz turns his remarkable talent to the haunting, impossible power of love – obsessive love, illicit love, fading love, maternal love. On a beach in the Dominican Republic, a doomed relationship flounders. In the heat of a hospital laundry room in New Jersey, a woman does her lover’s washing and thinks about his wife. In Boston, a man buys his love child, his only son, a first baseball bat and glove. At the heart of these stories is the irrepressible, irresistible Yunior, a young hardhead whose longing for love is equaled only by his recklessness--and by the extraordinary women he loves and loses: artistic Alma; the aging Miss Lora; Magdalena, who thinks all Dominican men are cheaters; and the love of his life, whose heartbreak ultimately becomes his own. In prose that is endlessly energetic, inventive, tender, and funny, the stories in the New York Times-Bestselling This Is How You Lose Her lay bare the infinite longing and inevitable weakness of the human heart. They remind us that passion always triumphs over experience, and that “the half-life of love is forever.”

Published: Penguin Group on Sep 11, 2012
ISBN: 9781101596951
List price: $12.99
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This is How You Lose Her is a novel written in short story form. The main character, Yunior, is a tragic but compelling individual. I really liked him, even though he liked to sleep around on his women and had some of his own issues to get over. Living in America but born in Santo Domingo, Yunior was trying to adjust and live life, all while chasing as many women as possible.While I was reading, I came across this quote that made me laugh. This occurred while Yunior and his mother were discussing a neighbor who didn’t have any children: “Maybe she just doesn’t like children.” ”Nobody likes children, your mother assured you. That doesn’t mean you don’t have them.” (p. 153) I highly recommend this book!Thanks for reading, Rebecca @ Love at First Bookread more
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Through Yunior's strong voice, the reader watches the train wreck of his relationships as they fall apart one by one. Promiscuous, brilliant, charming, loyal to family and country, vulnerable, irreverent--he is a complex character who is difficult for this female reader to like. Yet the vignettes of his relationships, which both stand alone and intertwine,are compelling.read more
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I wish I knew Spanish so that I could know what a lot of the slang and conversational phrases were in the stories. Still enjoyable.read more
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This is How You Lose Her is a novel written in short story form. The main character, Yunior, is a tragic but compelling individual. I really liked him, even though he liked to sleep around on his women and had some of his own issues to get over. Living in America but born in Santo Domingo, Yunior was trying to adjust and live life, all while chasing as many women as possible.While I was reading, I came across this quote that made me laugh. This occurred while Yunior and his mother were discussing a neighbor who didn’t have any children: “Maybe she just doesn’t like children.” ”Nobody likes children, your mother assured you. That doesn’t mean you don’t have them.” (p. 153) I highly recommend this book!Thanks for reading, Rebecca @ Love at First Book
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Through Yunior's strong voice, the reader watches the train wreck of his relationships as they fall apart one by one. Promiscuous, brilliant, charming, loyal to family and country, vulnerable, irreverent--he is a complex character who is difficult for this female reader to like. Yet the vignettes of his relationships, which both stand alone and intertwine,are compelling.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I wish I knew Spanish so that I could know what a lot of the slang and conversational phrases were in the stories. Still enjoyable.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Crude and raw, almost like being privvy to the musings of teenage boys in a locker room. Relationships, the quest for love and companionship, what type of person appeals to whom and the choices we make to stay connected. Interlocking stories, which put together tell the stories of a life with all it's expectations of bettering oneself or maybe just living each day. Okay, just not for me right now.
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In these short stories, Diaz returns again and again to the challenges of love and loss. The stories are linked by Yunior, a complex character who fails at love in every way possible. Diaz travels back and forth in time, allowing his readers to gradually see the full picture. He once again writes what he knows, the experience of a native of the Dominican Republic in the U.S. As a result, each story is packed with details that makes it leap off the page. Diaz's style is made for short stories. It is spare and rich. For example, in contrasting a lush resort with the rest of the Dominican Republic, Diaz observes, "Case de Campo has got beaches the way the rest of the island has got problems." What really impressed me is that I shouldn't have identified with these characters, these situations, and these stories. Yunior's experiences in life and love couldn't be farther from my own. But I fell into each story. I turned the last page and wanted to start back at the beginning. In addition to being a master class in short story writing, Diaz provides a fresh look at a topic that so many others have written about - love.
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Diaz is terrific with language and shows great inventiveness. It is a great follow up to his previous Pulitizer Prize winning novel. The stories can be frustrating because the lead character's faults are big time but the book is real because this how people can be. Diaz definitely takes me into a world that is different from mine and one that I accept as real. This is a great read and certainly an author that should be read by a wide audience. I will go back and read his first book and anxiously await the next.
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