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The acclaimed bestseller that's teaching the world about the power of mass collaboration.

Translated into more than twenty languages and named one of the best business books of the year by reviewers around the world, Wikinomics has become essential reading for business people everywhere. It explains how mass collaboration is happening not just at Web sites like Wikipedia and YouTube, but at traditional companies that have embraced technology to breathe new life into their enterprises.

This national bestseller reveals the nuances that drive wikinomics, and share fascinating stories of how masses of people (both paid and volunteer) are now creating TV news stories, sequencing the human gnome, remixing their favorite music, designing software, finding cures for diseases, editing school texts, inventing new cosmetics, and even building motorcycles.
Published: Penguin Group on
ISBN: 9781440639487
List price: $13.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Interesting in some parts, with some new ideas. Unfortunately it lacked some thorough editing to remove several repetitions of some concepts that get reinstated time and time again.
Could be a good tool to explain web 2.0 / collaboration to someon with no experience of it, for people familiar with the current "web 2.0" situation there are some nuggets, but most information will taste stale.more
A must read in any business person's library. The game is changing and this has a lot of great ideas on spurring innovation in a collaborative environment.more
I've read Barabási's (Linked) and Merchant's (New How) books before this one so most ideas were already known, but Tapscott's approach was a bit closer to what I was looking or wanted to hear about. These three books could easily be sold together. Maybe there are others but I think these ones interlock together just fine. The world is changing, how we do business is changing, how we relate with each other is changing too. We must, at least, be aware of these changes, furthermore if we want to continue doing business. We must change or re-shape all our out-dated concepts and for that we must know and understand what the heck is happening! Even those out-dated examples! If they could do it, why can't we? A. just look at what we've got; B. just look at what we want; C. how's the best way to get from A to B? Nobody said we can't...more
Wikinomics is all about taking the business model of Wikipedia and expanding it to marketable products, service lines, and companies. Published in 2008, it's surprising how dated some of the examples seem today (My Space? Friendster? Delicious?) It does go to show how fickle the public can be, today's billion dollar baby is the butt of tomorrow's joke. Examples aside, Wikinomics - How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything is all about the benefits of open source; putting ideas into the public domain; and receiving highly qualified input from contributors throughout the world. Tapscott lauds corporations that embrace this new paradigm; and vilifies those who cling too tightly to the seemingly out-dated concepts of intellectual property. A few mega-corps are targets of his scorn: Apple and Sony among them. And a few are heralded as leaders in this new world, among them IBM. The book is rife with examples on how some existing companies or product lines leverage the phenomenon of community development. For business folk looking a new, possibly profitable, direct, it can provide food for thought. However, it can just as easily spell doom for currently lucrative industries should their cash cow be served at the soup kitchen. Tapscott does not balance his book by suggesting this approach could spell doom for particular industries or product lines.Tapscott also revisits the same examples over and over. This rather undermines the "all the cool kids are doing it" vibe he's trying to convey n the book. I think I would have enjoyed a shorter, tighter book that visits these corporate examples but once. After the second or third time, these examples feel recycled and whatever point Tapscott is trying to make is lost. Still, while I was already familiar with open-source software development (Linux was his model) and, of course, Wikipedia; it was kind of neat seeing how something not in the tech/IP realm: a gold mining company, leverages this model to find new veins to exploit.more
A good read about how mass collaboration is changing the world. A bit outdated now -- "imagine if Apple came out with a phone!?"more
Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams’ Wikinomics combines three topics—social media tools (wikis), economics, and collaboration—to produce a stimulating exploration of how the changes we are facing can be used to our advantage to foster success through collaboration and sharing rather than hoarding. Their economic model is one of exchanging goods and services without charge—a theme also creatively explored by Chris Anderson in Free: The Future of a Radical Price—in ways that benefit all involved while not ignoring the need for participants to reap financial as well as social benefits. The chapters on “The Wiki Workplace” and “Collaborative Minds” are particularly useful to anyone seeking new ways to foster collaboration and the building of communities, and they draw from their other work to suggest that social forces and changes are providing attractive opportunities: “…the Net Generation, and the rise of the new Web,” combined with the fact that “[m]ost large organizations today are geographically dispersed” and that “the nature of work itself is changing” is making the sort of collaboration fostered by people working on a wiki a tremendous model for collaboration (p. 246). What remains to be seen is whether we are willing to run with this model or let a magnificent opportunity pass by unused.more
The title of the book gives the game away. The message of the book has been so tightly refined that the author's - to their credit - boil the theory down to one word.more
I had a lot harder time reading this book than I expected. While it was interesting, I think the fact that it is talking about things that have already happened is a little difficult. Felt a little dated, although written a few years back I'm sure it was absolutely visionary. We are still on the tip of the collaboration iceberg as a national and global society, so I suppose more of these trends are likely to come. Worth reading.more
Wikinomics left me very disappointed. The authors maintained this breathless enthusiasm for the brave new future the wired elite among us are about to lead us into. I wholly agree with the general thesis that new methods of collaboration and open source goods and property will become a dominant force in the marketplace and there were some interesting examples described however in the end I found the ideas repetitive and mildly annoying.If however you want to see how large corporations can use open source software in ways that benefit everyone, read the first few chapters. I got a bit bored toward the end.more
Interesting if tediously upbeat and attempting-to-be-hip-by-coining-awful-words look at the mass collaboration, mostly via the Net.more
Reasonably interesting ideas, yet I couldn't keep interest in the book--a bit of a struggle to finish, in spite of the many underlines I made.more
A good "brain-jogger" to help you think more creatively about business, but feel free to skim rather than read deep, as it's very repetitive and talky instead of precise (a bane of most wikis).more
This is a great book. Everyone knows what Wikipedia, Flickr, YouTube and MySpace are; the authors explain how and why they work, and why they matter to business. They identify four critical components to mass collaboration: openness, peering, sharing, and acting globally.I thought the "acting globally" was interesting. They repeated stated that acting globally is not the same as multinational. Having "branches" in different countries isn't enough. Companies need to integrate the capabilities inside and outside their walls to bring products to market. And they need to do it while respecting community and cultural norms.I guess the one itch I have with the authors is the idea of "value creation." I put it the buzzword bingo category: everybody uses the phrase but nobody knows what it means. I don't think they did a good job defining it, either. And this is a vital economic concept as we move into the next century. If much of the IP is truly shared and if the barriers to entry are truly dropping in many areas, how does a company make money? Never mind the "returning value to investors," how do they make money to make payroll and keep the lights on? And how does the employee in a company deal with the fact that, for every talented individual I employ, there are 200 who are as good or better on the Internet?But how can you not like a book that says, "As it leverages its ecosystem to gobble up more surface area on the Web, [Amazon] is poised to become the dominant retail force on the planet, period. If we were running Wal-Mart, we would be very scared indeed."As an economic model, the idea of "mass collaboration" seems half-baked. That aside, the book is well written and documented, and is engaging reading.more
Read all 14 reviews

Reviews

Interesting in some parts, with some new ideas. Unfortunately it lacked some thorough editing to remove several repetitions of some concepts that get reinstated time and time again.
Could be a good tool to explain web 2.0 / collaboration to someon with no experience of it, for people familiar with the current "web 2.0" situation there are some nuggets, but most information will taste stale.more
A must read in any business person's library. The game is changing and this has a lot of great ideas on spurring innovation in a collaborative environment.more
I've read Barabási's (Linked) and Merchant's (New How) books before this one so most ideas were already known, but Tapscott's approach was a bit closer to what I was looking or wanted to hear about. These three books could easily be sold together. Maybe there are others but I think these ones interlock together just fine. The world is changing, how we do business is changing, how we relate with each other is changing too. We must, at least, be aware of these changes, furthermore if we want to continue doing business. We must change or re-shape all our out-dated concepts and for that we must know and understand what the heck is happening! Even those out-dated examples! If they could do it, why can't we? A. just look at what we've got; B. just look at what we want; C. how's the best way to get from A to B? Nobody said we can't...more
Wikinomics is all about taking the business model of Wikipedia and expanding it to marketable products, service lines, and companies. Published in 2008, it's surprising how dated some of the examples seem today (My Space? Friendster? Delicious?) It does go to show how fickle the public can be, today's billion dollar baby is the butt of tomorrow's joke. Examples aside, Wikinomics - How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything is all about the benefits of open source; putting ideas into the public domain; and receiving highly qualified input from contributors throughout the world. Tapscott lauds corporations that embrace this new paradigm; and vilifies those who cling too tightly to the seemingly out-dated concepts of intellectual property. A few mega-corps are targets of his scorn: Apple and Sony among them. And a few are heralded as leaders in this new world, among them IBM. The book is rife with examples on how some existing companies or product lines leverage the phenomenon of community development. For business folk looking a new, possibly profitable, direct, it can provide food for thought. However, it can just as easily spell doom for currently lucrative industries should their cash cow be served at the soup kitchen. Tapscott does not balance his book by suggesting this approach could spell doom for particular industries or product lines.Tapscott also revisits the same examples over and over. This rather undermines the "all the cool kids are doing it" vibe he's trying to convey n the book. I think I would have enjoyed a shorter, tighter book that visits these corporate examples but once. After the second or third time, these examples feel recycled and whatever point Tapscott is trying to make is lost. Still, while I was already familiar with open-source software development (Linux was his model) and, of course, Wikipedia; it was kind of neat seeing how something not in the tech/IP realm: a gold mining company, leverages this model to find new veins to exploit.more
A good read about how mass collaboration is changing the world. A bit outdated now -- "imagine if Apple came out with a phone!?"more
Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams’ Wikinomics combines three topics—social media tools (wikis), economics, and collaboration—to produce a stimulating exploration of how the changes we are facing can be used to our advantage to foster success through collaboration and sharing rather than hoarding. Their economic model is one of exchanging goods and services without charge—a theme also creatively explored by Chris Anderson in Free: The Future of a Radical Price—in ways that benefit all involved while not ignoring the need for participants to reap financial as well as social benefits. The chapters on “The Wiki Workplace” and “Collaborative Minds” are particularly useful to anyone seeking new ways to foster collaboration and the building of communities, and they draw from their other work to suggest that social forces and changes are providing attractive opportunities: “…the Net Generation, and the rise of the new Web,” combined with the fact that “[m]ost large organizations today are geographically dispersed” and that “the nature of work itself is changing” is making the sort of collaboration fostered by people working on a wiki a tremendous model for collaboration (p. 246). What remains to be seen is whether we are willing to run with this model or let a magnificent opportunity pass by unused.more
The title of the book gives the game away. The message of the book has been so tightly refined that the author's - to their credit - boil the theory down to one word.more
I had a lot harder time reading this book than I expected. While it was interesting, I think the fact that it is talking about things that have already happened is a little difficult. Felt a little dated, although written a few years back I'm sure it was absolutely visionary. We are still on the tip of the collaboration iceberg as a national and global society, so I suppose more of these trends are likely to come. Worth reading.more
Wikinomics left me very disappointed. The authors maintained this breathless enthusiasm for the brave new future the wired elite among us are about to lead us into. I wholly agree with the general thesis that new methods of collaboration and open source goods and property will become a dominant force in the marketplace and there were some interesting examples described however in the end I found the ideas repetitive and mildly annoying.If however you want to see how large corporations can use open source software in ways that benefit everyone, read the first few chapters. I got a bit bored toward the end.more
Interesting if tediously upbeat and attempting-to-be-hip-by-coining-awful-words look at the mass collaboration, mostly via the Net.more
Reasonably interesting ideas, yet I couldn't keep interest in the book--a bit of a struggle to finish, in spite of the many underlines I made.more
A good "brain-jogger" to help you think more creatively about business, but feel free to skim rather than read deep, as it's very repetitive and talky instead of precise (a bane of most wikis).more
This is a great book. Everyone knows what Wikipedia, Flickr, YouTube and MySpace are; the authors explain how and why they work, and why they matter to business. They identify four critical components to mass collaboration: openness, peering, sharing, and acting globally.I thought the "acting globally" was interesting. They repeated stated that acting globally is not the same as multinational. Having "branches" in different countries isn't enough. Companies need to integrate the capabilities inside and outside their walls to bring products to market. And they need to do it while respecting community and cultural norms.I guess the one itch I have with the authors is the idea of "value creation." I put it the buzzword bingo category: everybody uses the phrase but nobody knows what it means. I don't think they did a good job defining it, either. And this is a vital economic concept as we move into the next century. If much of the IP is truly shared and if the barriers to entry are truly dropping in many areas, how does a company make money? Never mind the "returning value to investors," how do they make money to make payroll and keep the lights on? And how does the employee in a company deal with the fact that, for every talented individual I employ, there are 200 who are as good or better on the Internet?But how can you not like a book that says, "As it leverages its ecosystem to gobble up more surface area on the Web, [Amazon] is poised to become the dominant retail force on the planet, period. If we were running Wal-Mart, we would be very scared indeed."As an economic model, the idea of "mass collaboration" seems half-baked. That aside, the book is well written and documented, and is engaging reading.more
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