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By edict of the king, the mighty Scottish laird Alec Kincaid must take an English bride. His choice was Jamie, youngest daughter of Baron Jamison...a feisty, violet-eyed beauty. Alec ached to touch her, to tame her, to possess her...forever. But Jamie vowed never to surrender to this highland barbarian.

He was everything her heart warned against—an arrogant scoundrel whose rough good looks spoke of savage pleasures. And thought Kincaid's scorching kisses fired her blood, she brazenly resisted him...until one rapturous moment quelled their clash of wills, and something far more dangerous than desire threatened to conquer her senses...
Published: Penguin Group on
ISBN: 9781101533116
List price: $5.99
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I’m surprised at the high rating for this book. Compared to other Garwood novels this one ranks quite low for me. I didn’t find the main characters as likeable or as endearing as some of her other novels. Alec Kinkaid is a typical Alpha male who wants a strong courageous woman. He wants her to be subservient and caring of him…even love him although he’s not prepared to reciprocate those feelings for fear that it would make him weak. Jaime is a fiesty and untamed violet-eyed beauty who understandably wants to be her husband’s equal. I found both of the main characters not as likeable as other Garwood novels. I didn’t start liking them till the middle of the book. Jaime came off as being too perfect with her only flaws being her temper and no sense of direction. Alec was just arrogant with old fashion sensibilities. Some of the character interactions were funny, but some parts that were supposed to be witty I found to be annoying. The plot was also predictable and very similar to her other Highland romances. Overall, it was an okay quick read…perfect for a rainy day read or a beach read.more
This is the worst kind of storytelling -- cliched, head-hopping, main characters always set to 11, supporting characters not really fleshed out. The h/h spend the entire book purposefully misunderstanding each other, screaming at each other, and having a lot of cliched but unmemorable sex. There's no real tension -- despite what Garwood wants you to think with all the damned shouting -- because there's no POV -- you always know what every character is thinking. Nothing is withheld. Nothing here to recommend a female hero who is presented as the most capable member of her household, but meets the hero and suddenly can't do anything right except make the male hero angry, which seems to equal turned-on. The whole story seems to take place in a few days, in which many improbable little scenarios arise and are resolved, much shouting, huffing and puffing occur, and yet everything turns out ok. And the main characters, if it seems like you've met them before, you have. Nothing about them is presented as unique: Tiny, beautiful spunk and big, lusty hunk. The one subplot that may have differentiated this book is not adequately fleshed out. Not recommended. -cgmore
I was disappointed in The Bride this time around. I originally read it sometime during high school, and I remember loving it at the time and thinking it was the best book ever. My experience this time (12 years later) is just a taaad different.

Julie Garwood is a great romance writer, one of the "pillars" of the genre. She is famous for melding heart-warming humor with romance in her novels, and her medievals are considered "classics." This is quite the accomplishment and makes for a fun, light and humorous read, right? This book even won the Rita Award in 1990! So why didn't this book do it for me?

First, the set up: Alec, a powerful Scottish Highlander, is forced by edict of the English king to marry an English lass (FYI- the English and the Scottish Highlanders are very different and don't like each other.) He shows up with his buddy, has the hots for the impetuous, violet eyed and beautiful Jamie, marries her, and carts her off with him to the Highlands. And so the drama begins.

First of all, the hero, Alec Kincaid, is kind of an ass. Yes, we get it, he's a warrior and all that, but he treats Jamie like she is an annoying nuisance (which she very well might be) and tried to make her insecure all the time. He also tries to bully and push her around and make her "succumb to his will," whatever that means even though he actually adores the hell out of her. Does he ever apologize? Nope! In the end Jamie "wins," but not because she is an equal partner or anything, but rather because she annoys him into surrender.

In comes Jamie: Beautiful and violet-eyed, impetuous, (as evidenced by the fact that she likes to ride bare-back on her horse,) educated in the healing arts (as all heroines in medievals,) and a little bit of a meddling busy-body (which, in her case, is not supposed to be a bad thing.) She seems unaware of her "place" as Medieval society would dictate it and doesn't understand that she is supposed to be inferior and "obedient" to her husband, so she constantly questions him and badgers him about it. In her first week as wife of the laird, she manages to almost start three (or is it 4?) wars with neighboring clans, saves multiple lives, and earns the love and undying loyalty of nearly everyone in the clan.

I really wish a few things for this book. I wish that Jamie was a little bit less of a well meaning ditz and more of an equal partner to Alec, who I wish was a little bit less of a jerk and a little bit more loving and supportive. I wish that there was more time in the book for Alec to realize that a woman can be an equal partner and a worthy opponent. I wish that Jamie didn't feel like she had to take care of everything and everyone and actually DEALT with the fact that her step-dad treated her like a servant and she feels like she has to be one in order to be accepted/loved. I wish there weren't these long dialogue bits where each of the characters would be talking about nothing (really, nothing!) and lose their train of thought. I wish there were more of the moments of brilliance and fun I found in the text like when Jamie and Alec first meet and their wedding night. This book had a lot of potential, and it was well written, but there was just something missing for me here.more
Enjoyed this book, set in early English history during the 1100s. There were interesting adventures and clashes between the Scottish warrior and his English bride. Liked reading about the characters. Listened to this though Audible.com.more
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Reviews

I’m surprised at the high rating for this book. Compared to other Garwood novels this one ranks quite low for me. I didn’t find the main characters as likeable or as endearing as some of her other novels. Alec Kinkaid is a typical Alpha male who wants a strong courageous woman. He wants her to be subservient and caring of him…even love him although he’s not prepared to reciprocate those feelings for fear that it would make him weak. Jaime is a fiesty and untamed violet-eyed beauty who understandably wants to be her husband’s equal. I found both of the main characters not as likeable as other Garwood novels. I didn’t start liking them till the middle of the book. Jaime came off as being too perfect with her only flaws being her temper and no sense of direction. Alec was just arrogant with old fashion sensibilities. Some of the character interactions were funny, but some parts that were supposed to be witty I found to be annoying. The plot was also predictable and very similar to her other Highland romances. Overall, it was an okay quick read…perfect for a rainy day read or a beach read.more
This is the worst kind of storytelling -- cliched, head-hopping, main characters always set to 11, supporting characters not really fleshed out. The h/h spend the entire book purposefully misunderstanding each other, screaming at each other, and having a lot of cliched but unmemorable sex. There's no real tension -- despite what Garwood wants you to think with all the damned shouting -- because there's no POV -- you always know what every character is thinking. Nothing is withheld. Nothing here to recommend a female hero who is presented as the most capable member of her household, but meets the hero and suddenly can't do anything right except make the male hero angry, which seems to equal turned-on. The whole story seems to take place in a few days, in which many improbable little scenarios arise and are resolved, much shouting, huffing and puffing occur, and yet everything turns out ok. And the main characters, if it seems like you've met them before, you have. Nothing about them is presented as unique: Tiny, beautiful spunk and big, lusty hunk. The one subplot that may have differentiated this book is not adequately fleshed out. Not recommended. -cgmore
I was disappointed in The Bride this time around. I originally read it sometime during high school, and I remember loving it at the time and thinking it was the best book ever. My experience this time (12 years later) is just a taaad different.

Julie Garwood is a great romance writer, one of the "pillars" of the genre. She is famous for melding heart-warming humor with romance in her novels, and her medievals are considered "classics." This is quite the accomplishment and makes for a fun, light and humorous read, right? This book even won the Rita Award in 1990! So why didn't this book do it for me?

First, the set up: Alec, a powerful Scottish Highlander, is forced by edict of the English king to marry an English lass (FYI- the English and the Scottish Highlanders are very different and don't like each other.) He shows up with his buddy, has the hots for the impetuous, violet eyed and beautiful Jamie, marries her, and carts her off with him to the Highlands. And so the drama begins.

First of all, the hero, Alec Kincaid, is kind of an ass. Yes, we get it, he's a warrior and all that, but he treats Jamie like she is an annoying nuisance (which she very well might be) and tried to make her insecure all the time. He also tries to bully and push her around and make her "succumb to his will," whatever that means even though he actually adores the hell out of her. Does he ever apologize? Nope! In the end Jamie "wins," but not because she is an equal partner or anything, but rather because she annoys him into surrender.

In comes Jamie: Beautiful and violet-eyed, impetuous, (as evidenced by the fact that she likes to ride bare-back on her horse,) educated in the healing arts (as all heroines in medievals,) and a little bit of a meddling busy-body (which, in her case, is not supposed to be a bad thing.) She seems unaware of her "place" as Medieval society would dictate it and doesn't understand that she is supposed to be inferior and "obedient" to her husband, so she constantly questions him and badgers him about it. In her first week as wife of the laird, she manages to almost start three (or is it 4?) wars with neighboring clans, saves multiple lives, and earns the love and undying loyalty of nearly everyone in the clan.

I really wish a few things for this book. I wish that Jamie was a little bit less of a well meaning ditz and more of an equal partner to Alec, who I wish was a little bit less of a jerk and a little bit more loving and supportive. I wish that there was more time in the book for Alec to realize that a woman can be an equal partner and a worthy opponent. I wish that Jamie didn't feel like she had to take care of everything and everyone and actually DEALT with the fact that her step-dad treated her like a servant and she feels like she has to be one in order to be accepted/loved. I wish there weren't these long dialogue bits where each of the characters would be talking about nothing (really, nothing!) and lose their train of thought. I wish there were more of the moments of brilliance and fun I found in the text like when Jamie and Alec first meet and their wedding night. This book had a lot of potential, and it was well written, but there was just something missing for me here.more
Enjoyed this book, set in early English history during the 1100s. There were interesting adventures and clashes between the Scottish warrior and his English bride. Liked reading about the characters. Listened to this though Audible.com.more
Jamie is the youngest of her sisters, but is the one that has always protected them. For her that is normal, however for most families...its not. So when the king orders that one of her sisters marry Alec Kincaid, she is at a loss on how to comfort them..for they will have to marry a scot and a barbarian. However when she meets Alec, he chooses her as his bride. At first Jamie doens't comprehend why he would want to marry her, but knows that she has no choice, better her sacrifice than any of her sisters. So with both her and her sister Mary married off to his friend, they head out to Scotland, not knowing how her life may change. At first all that exist between Alec and Jamie is confusion, opposite personalities and a powerful desire that fires up the blood. However as things progress between these two, a tender love develops.The Bride is one of the historical's written by Julie Garwood. Its also one of my favorite type of story plots that I enjoy reading. I know I have read this one before now, however I know its been along time since there were moments that I was surprised and part I didn't remember. So it was good reading this again, and getting to know these characters and what a great story it is. We have a heroine that isn't appreciated, who was practically treated a a servant, and Alec is very protective of her, and shows her what its like to be appreciated and cherished. Something she has never experienced before until she meets him. Such a truly magical story with love and passion and some mystery aspects to heighten the blood, and one that will delight you!!! I loved it!!!more
I'm going to go out on a limb here and say no one writes romance like Julie Garwood. My first introduction to her work was "The Gift," and I thought "The Bride" could not live up to that story. I was wrong; it's a beautifully-written romance that will have you laughing, crying, and utterly breathless by the end. I so enjoyed the interwoven mystery. Jamie is a heroine you can cheer for--she's strong, loyal, and generous. Although Alec seems like a brute at times, he fiercely protects Jamie. The pair look for the best in each other, and even though they were forced to wed, they try to make the most of it. Jamie stands by her husband and refuses to believe the rumor that he killed his first wife. Alec, on the other hand, insists that his wife be treated like a queen to make up for the hard work her father and sisters forced on her. In a way, I suppose this is almost like a Cinderella story. The prince is indeed charming, Jamie is kind and exceedingly beautiful, and the ending is every bit as "happily ever after" as you would expect.more
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