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Behind the headlines on cloning--Dr. Robin Cook blends fact with fiction in one of his most terrifying bestsellers...

Chromosome 6 is a prophetic thriller that challenges the medical ethics of genetic manipulation and cloning in the jungles of equatorial Africa, where one mistake could bridge the gap between man and ape--and forever change the genetic map of our existence...

Published: Penguin Group on
ISBN: 9781101190548
List price: $9.99
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Availability for Chromosome 6
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
An odd book, in the last episode (Contagion) Dr Jack Stapleton was a cynical & sarcastic risk taker whose banter I quite enjoyed, in the opening of this book suddenly he has the appetite for risk of a 90 year old with osteoporosis, then suddenly he decides to flit off to Africa, with his own money, and 5 additional people, 2 of which were complete strangers he's just met. It all was a bit ramshackle.

On the medical side of things, the areas of the book which dealt with forensic pathology and transgenics were interesting but the overall impression was a handful of narratives grouped together where there were holes in the plot line. It wasn't a bad book, but I definitely preferred the other Robin Cook books where realism takes a higher priority compared to sensationalism.more
very nice novel, the story about group of doctors of two different places, how they come together to solve a mystery about the liver transplant, overall a very nice conceptmore
Chromosome 6 presents an intriguing point of view from a storytelling front - as well as challenging whether or not a certain front of genetic manipulation should be followed.The book is a great medical thriller and poses one of the best not only "What if?", but also "Should you if you had the wherewithal to do so?" questions.After all, if you were able to have a perfect genetic match for any transplant you might need, would you take it? But what if it involved the kind of research that could and would raise eyebrows? Would you use that option then?Very good reading.more
Note: For the purposes of this review, we will consider plots to be the quantum equivalent of lines or planes; therefore, plots, unlike lines or planes, can be parallel and intersecting at the same time. This is called the “plot-line tunneling effect.”In this fast-paced medical thriller, Cook develops two parallel and intersecting plots about scientists in Equatorial Guinea who are frantically exploring the ethics of genetic engineering, and medical examiners in New York who are stubbornly (and against all odds) determining the cause of death of a mysterious mobster-corpse. I found Cook’s characters well-developed, his plot original, and his narrative both humorous and suspenseful. Although I am generally not a fan of authors who reuse characters (how often can once-in-a-lifetime adventures happen to one medical examiner?), I loved this book and recommend it to any fan of medical suspense. I also found the genetic science thrillingly believable, considering that I, like one of the main characters, am a molecular biologist.more
A Jack Stapleton and Laurie Montgomery novel. This book is about a group of doctors that are genetically growing human organs from monkeys. The plot involves the mob and takes place in NYC and Africa ( the latter is where the transgenetic work is done). The experiments in Africa are out of control and Jack, Laura and friends go there and meet up with facility employees trying to find out what is happening. In the end they release the monkeys from their captivity.more
Robin Cook writes a good medical conspiracy book...always makes me nervous about doctors or anything related to the medical field.more
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Reviews

An odd book, in the last episode (Contagion) Dr Jack Stapleton was a cynical & sarcastic risk taker whose banter I quite enjoyed, in the opening of this book suddenly he has the appetite for risk of a 90 year old with osteoporosis, then suddenly he decides to flit off to Africa, with his own money, and 5 additional people, 2 of which were complete strangers he's just met. It all was a bit ramshackle.

On the medical side of things, the areas of the book which dealt with forensic pathology and transgenics were interesting but the overall impression was a handful of narratives grouped together where there were holes in the plot line. It wasn't a bad book, but I definitely preferred the other Robin Cook books where realism takes a higher priority compared to sensationalism.more
very nice novel, the story about group of doctors of two different places, how they come together to solve a mystery about the liver transplant, overall a very nice conceptmore
Chromosome 6 presents an intriguing point of view from a storytelling front - as well as challenging whether or not a certain front of genetic manipulation should be followed.The book is a great medical thriller and poses one of the best not only "What if?", but also "Should you if you had the wherewithal to do so?" questions.After all, if you were able to have a perfect genetic match for any transplant you might need, would you take it? But what if it involved the kind of research that could and would raise eyebrows? Would you use that option then?Very good reading.more
Note: For the purposes of this review, we will consider plots to be the quantum equivalent of lines or planes; therefore, plots, unlike lines or planes, can be parallel and intersecting at the same time. This is called the “plot-line tunneling effect.”In this fast-paced medical thriller, Cook develops two parallel and intersecting plots about scientists in Equatorial Guinea who are frantically exploring the ethics of genetic engineering, and medical examiners in New York who are stubbornly (and against all odds) determining the cause of death of a mysterious mobster-corpse. I found Cook’s characters well-developed, his plot original, and his narrative both humorous and suspenseful. Although I am generally not a fan of authors who reuse characters (how often can once-in-a-lifetime adventures happen to one medical examiner?), I loved this book and recommend it to any fan of medical suspense. I also found the genetic science thrillingly believable, considering that I, like one of the main characters, am a molecular biologist.more
A Jack Stapleton and Laurie Montgomery novel. This book is about a group of doctors that are genetically growing human organs from monkeys. The plot involves the mob and takes place in NYC and Africa ( the latter is where the transgenetic work is done). The experiments in Africa are out of control and Jack, Laura and friends go there and meet up with facility employees trying to find out what is happening. In the end they release the monkeys from their captivity.more
Robin Cook writes a good medical conspiracy book...always makes me nervous about doctors or anything related to the medical field.more
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