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#1 New York Times Bestseller

A definitive compendium of food wisdom


Eating doesn’t have to be so complicated. In this age of ever-more elaborate diets and conflicting health advice, Food Rules brings welcome simplicity to our daily decisions about food. Written with clarity, concision, and wit that has become bestselling author Michael Pollan’s trademark, this indispensable handbook lays out a set of straightforward, memorable rules for eating wisely, one per page, accompanied by a concise explanation. It’s an easy-to-use guide that draws from a variety of traditions, suggesting how different cultures through the ages have arrived at the same enduring wisdom about food. Whether at the supermarket or an all-you-can-eat buffet, this is the perfect guide for anyone who ever wondered, “What should I eat?”

"In the more than four decades that I have been reading and writing about the findings of nutritional science, I have come across nothing more intelligent, sensible and simple to follow than the 64 principles outlined in a slender, easy-to-digest new book called Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, by Michael Pollan." --Jane Brody, The New York Times

"The most sensible diet plan ever? We think it's the one that Michael Pollan outlined a few years ago: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” So we're happy that in his little new book, Food Rules, Pollan offers more common-sense rules for eating: 64 of them, in fact, all thought-provoking and some laugh-out-loud funny." --The Houston Chronicle

" It doesn't get much easier than this. Each page has a simple rule, sometimes with a short explanation, sometimes without, that promotes Pollan's back-to-the-basics-of-food (and-food-enjoyment) philosophy." --The Los Angeles Times
 
"A useful and funny purse-sized manual that could easily replace all the diet books on your bookshelf."  --Tara Parker-Pope, The New York Times


Michael Pollan’s newest book Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation--the story of our most trusted food expert’s culinary education--was published by The Penguin Press in April 2013.
Published: Penguin Group on
ISBN: 9781101163160
List price: $9.99
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I enjoyed this quick read over my lunch break, as it had a number of pearls of foodie wisdom. Some favorites:

"Avoid food products containing ingredients a third-grader cannot pronounce."

Eat only foods that will eventually rot.

"If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don't."

"It's not food if it arrived through the window of your car."

"It's not food if it's called by the same name in every language. (Think Big Mac, Cheetos, or Pringles.)"

"Eat your colors."

"Be the kind of person who takes supplements--then skip the supplements."

"The banquet is in the first bite."

"Try not to eat alone."

"Spend as much time enjoying the meal as it took to prepare it."more
Basically the same as In Defense of Food, but with pictures instead of research.more
Wuotes:“...There's a lot of money in the Western diet. The more you process any food, the more profitable it becomes. The healthcare industry makes more money treating chronic diseases (which account for three quarters of the $2 trillion plus we spend each year on health care in this country) than preventing them. ” “For a product to carry a health claim on its package, it must first have a package, so right off the bat it's more likely to be processed rather than a whole food.”more
It's not bursting with content, but it's a useful little book which I like to randomly flip through now and then. The short sections serve as gentle reminders about how we should go about making our food choices. It's always worth remembering that 'it's not food if it arrived through the window of your car'.

Which is why I always hitch a ride.more
Clever little book, wouldn't mind another perusal. (I'll say it again: books made for skimming don't seem to work that well as ebooks, at least not on my phone.)more
This book is extracted from the last part of Michael Pollan's previous book, In Defense of Food, and expands on his basic 3-part advice: "Eat real food, Mostly Plants, Not too much".In Defense of Food is definitely worth reading, and this book provides a nice concise summary of Pollan's good advice.more
Michael Pollan's book "Food Rules: an eater's manual" is simple, direct, and makes sense. The basic rule is: eat real food! All the rest of the book is narrowing down what real food is. No chapters on nutrition, antioxidants, carbs vs. fats, or anything scientific or dietbook-like. Not that he doesn't throw in results from scientific studies, but this is not a reference to find the best nutrients, vitamins and minerals in food. It is practical, and when you really get down to it, we all know this stuff, so why read the book? Because we all need reminding that eating real food is not that hard. My only gripe is the cost of the book! $11.00 for a book that can be read in about an hour. I guess the good news is that the book can be read very quickly and the rules can be applied immediately because they are so basic.more
Saw this book at the library and took it out to peruse the illustrations by Maria Kolman. They are primitive, simple illustrations but nevertheless thouroughly enjoyable to look at. Not sure that I lost any weight while reading this book but the "Rules" are sure to be helpful along that line if you can adhere to them. You can hardly go wrong in recommending this book since it is so short and colorful that the entire thing can be read in in a night or two.more
Not so much a book, more a manifesto. 64 principles to guide our relationship with food - some synthesized from in-depth research (see Pollan's "In Defence of Food"), some a reminder of homespun wisdom learned at your grandmother's knee. It's a map to keep us on the straight-and-narrow, despite Food Inc's best efforts to industrialise what we eat. Well done, nourishing, and sprinkled with wit.more
This was a good, quick read, nicely illustrated by Kalman. Some good rules. I'm still not following them, but I've got a better idea what I'm breaking. :) I should read some of Pollan's writing (this is more of a collection of aphorisms than anything else).more
I should read this every month or so to keep myself on track. They are only little snippets, but following them is challenging (and rewarding)!more
Food Rules: An Eater's Manual is a short and (not so big on the) sweet(s) little book. Written for those who are eager to learn more about the food they're putting into their body, but aren't interested in a lot of research, the rules are presented in a clear and easy to follow format. The length of this book is both an advantage and a disadvantage for the book in my opinion. The short length allows the reader to learn simple guidelines they can follow right away without having to analyze too much; but not every rule is so easily simplified, and I think that is why Michael makes a habit to mention a lot of exceptions in this book, and also points readers interested in knowing more to his longer book on the subject titled The Omnivore's Dilemma. Yet the most important rule of all that Michael gives can certainly sum up the entire book in a second:"Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants."more
A very quick read giving people rules to remind us of things we like to think we know but sometimes rarely practice. I enjoyed the rules not only for they said but the manner in which they were written. Example:If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don't.OrIt's not food if it arrived through the window of your car.more
Michael Pollan says you can read this short book in under an hour, and he is absolutely correct. It’s a fun little book with 64 easy-to-remember rules about buying, preparing and eating food. The rules are all intended to be clarifications of Pollan’s three main food rules: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. If you are interested in food and cooking, and you think a lot about what you’re going to eat, then you are probably, like me, already following many of these food rules.more
My main issue with this book was the price: $11 list price. How can the publisher justify slapping such a ridiculous number on such a small book?Overall, a good set of rules on what to eat (and not eat), but not very substantive past that. This is essentially In Defense of Food boiled down into some guidelines for eating. Nothing really new here, but good to have it reiterated.more
This books distills a lot of information into a short set of common sense food ideas. Nothing really new, but nice for a quick reminder when you need. The book can be read in one sitting.more
This is a quick-to-read book which gives Michael Pollan’s sensible advice about what we should eat (food), what kind of food (mostly plants), and how much (not too much). There’s not much here that he hasn’t said in a much more interesting way in his previous books, especially the book entitled The Omnivore’s Dilemma. The book is kind of cute, but I’m ready for another in-depth book by this journalist about any subject. It does not even have to be about food.more
Easy to read, this great little book lays out 64 pretty simple, though sometimes embarrassingly obvious, nuggets of wisdom that we've probably all seen but not all in one place, maxims and suggestions one can try living by to eat and live more healthily. Some are subtle, like #1, "Eat food", encouraging us to remember the real meaning of that word; or simple and direct, like #63, "Cook", which could be a life-changing experience for some. Other rules are practical suggesti... (show more)The book is split into three parts that follow Pollan's own maxim for living a more healthy life... "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." So simple yet often so hard in the processed societies many of us live in. There's something for everyone here to learn and change by, remember and live by. For those who want research details for all the rules, see Pollan's previous book, "In Defense of Food". Originally written on Feb 02, 2010 at 01:13PMmore
Michael Pollan was preaching to the converted with me on this one. But it's pleasant to be able to read a book and agree with every word. A quick read.more
A quick little read that is slightly humorous. He boils his advice down to seven words that focus on three things. "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly Plants."Eat real food not processed crap.Use rules to help control your eating habits.Focus on plants and not meat.more
This brief volume expands on Michael Pollan's mantra - eat food, not too much, mostly plants - with a series of easily understood and often amusing rules. These rules are the distilled common sense of the many people who wrote to Pollan. Some have short explanations but this is definitely not a scientic treatise on nutrition.more
This book didn't really teach me anything I hadn't read before, but it was aesthetically pleasing and I enjoyed the list like format.more
Super straightforward approach to eating in the modern world. 64 rules, the last of which is that sometimes it's ok to break the rules (phew!). Terrific to share with grades 3 and up.more
I was quite upset when I received this book. It is just a concise version of In Defense of Food (which I had already read). So, if you want to skip the longer version of the book, than this is the book to get. If you want to get more from a book than rules on eating - don't get this book.more
Read all 51 reviews

Reviews

I enjoyed this quick read over my lunch break, as it had a number of pearls of foodie wisdom. Some favorites:

"Avoid food products containing ingredients a third-grader cannot pronounce."

Eat only foods that will eventually rot.

"If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don't."

"It's not food if it arrived through the window of your car."

"It's not food if it's called by the same name in every language. (Think Big Mac, Cheetos, or Pringles.)"

"Eat your colors."

"Be the kind of person who takes supplements--then skip the supplements."

"The banquet is in the first bite."

"Try not to eat alone."

"Spend as much time enjoying the meal as it took to prepare it."more
Basically the same as In Defense of Food, but with pictures instead of research.more
Wuotes:“...There's a lot of money in the Western diet. The more you process any food, the more profitable it becomes. The healthcare industry makes more money treating chronic diseases (which account for three quarters of the $2 trillion plus we spend each year on health care in this country) than preventing them. ” “For a product to carry a health claim on its package, it must first have a package, so right off the bat it's more likely to be processed rather than a whole food.”more
It's not bursting with content, but it's a useful little book which I like to randomly flip through now and then. The short sections serve as gentle reminders about how we should go about making our food choices. It's always worth remembering that 'it's not food if it arrived through the window of your car'.

Which is why I always hitch a ride.more
Clever little book, wouldn't mind another perusal. (I'll say it again: books made for skimming don't seem to work that well as ebooks, at least not on my phone.)more
This book is extracted from the last part of Michael Pollan's previous book, In Defense of Food, and expands on his basic 3-part advice: "Eat real food, Mostly Plants, Not too much".In Defense of Food is definitely worth reading, and this book provides a nice concise summary of Pollan's good advice.more
Michael Pollan's book "Food Rules: an eater's manual" is simple, direct, and makes sense. The basic rule is: eat real food! All the rest of the book is narrowing down what real food is. No chapters on nutrition, antioxidants, carbs vs. fats, or anything scientific or dietbook-like. Not that he doesn't throw in results from scientific studies, but this is not a reference to find the best nutrients, vitamins and minerals in food. It is practical, and when you really get down to it, we all know this stuff, so why read the book? Because we all need reminding that eating real food is not that hard. My only gripe is the cost of the book! $11.00 for a book that can be read in about an hour. I guess the good news is that the book can be read very quickly and the rules can be applied immediately because they are so basic.more
Saw this book at the library and took it out to peruse the illustrations by Maria Kolman. They are primitive, simple illustrations but nevertheless thouroughly enjoyable to look at. Not sure that I lost any weight while reading this book but the "Rules" are sure to be helpful along that line if you can adhere to them. You can hardly go wrong in recommending this book since it is so short and colorful that the entire thing can be read in in a night or two.more
Not so much a book, more a manifesto. 64 principles to guide our relationship with food - some synthesized from in-depth research (see Pollan's "In Defence of Food"), some a reminder of homespun wisdom learned at your grandmother's knee. It's a map to keep us on the straight-and-narrow, despite Food Inc's best efforts to industrialise what we eat. Well done, nourishing, and sprinkled with wit.more
This was a good, quick read, nicely illustrated by Kalman. Some good rules. I'm still not following them, but I've got a better idea what I'm breaking. :) I should read some of Pollan's writing (this is more of a collection of aphorisms than anything else).more
I should read this every month or so to keep myself on track. They are only little snippets, but following them is challenging (and rewarding)!more
Food Rules: An Eater's Manual is a short and (not so big on the) sweet(s) little book. Written for those who are eager to learn more about the food they're putting into their body, but aren't interested in a lot of research, the rules are presented in a clear and easy to follow format. The length of this book is both an advantage and a disadvantage for the book in my opinion. The short length allows the reader to learn simple guidelines they can follow right away without having to analyze too much; but not every rule is so easily simplified, and I think that is why Michael makes a habit to mention a lot of exceptions in this book, and also points readers interested in knowing more to his longer book on the subject titled The Omnivore's Dilemma. Yet the most important rule of all that Michael gives can certainly sum up the entire book in a second:"Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants."more
A very quick read giving people rules to remind us of things we like to think we know but sometimes rarely practice. I enjoyed the rules not only for they said but the manner in which they were written. Example:If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don't.OrIt's not food if it arrived through the window of your car.more
Michael Pollan says you can read this short book in under an hour, and he is absolutely correct. It’s a fun little book with 64 easy-to-remember rules about buying, preparing and eating food. The rules are all intended to be clarifications of Pollan’s three main food rules: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. If you are interested in food and cooking, and you think a lot about what you’re going to eat, then you are probably, like me, already following many of these food rules.more
My main issue with this book was the price: $11 list price. How can the publisher justify slapping such a ridiculous number on such a small book?Overall, a good set of rules on what to eat (and not eat), but not very substantive past that. This is essentially In Defense of Food boiled down into some guidelines for eating. Nothing really new here, but good to have it reiterated.more
This books distills a lot of information into a short set of common sense food ideas. Nothing really new, but nice for a quick reminder when you need. The book can be read in one sitting.more
This is a quick-to-read book which gives Michael Pollan’s sensible advice about what we should eat (food), what kind of food (mostly plants), and how much (not too much). There’s not much here that he hasn’t said in a much more interesting way in his previous books, especially the book entitled The Omnivore’s Dilemma. The book is kind of cute, but I’m ready for another in-depth book by this journalist about any subject. It does not even have to be about food.more
Easy to read, this great little book lays out 64 pretty simple, though sometimes embarrassingly obvious, nuggets of wisdom that we've probably all seen but not all in one place, maxims and suggestions one can try living by to eat and live more healthily. Some are subtle, like #1, "Eat food", encouraging us to remember the real meaning of that word; or simple and direct, like #63, "Cook", which could be a life-changing experience for some. Other rules are practical suggesti... (show more)The book is split into three parts that follow Pollan's own maxim for living a more healthy life... "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." So simple yet often so hard in the processed societies many of us live in. There's something for everyone here to learn and change by, remember and live by. For those who want research details for all the rules, see Pollan's previous book, "In Defense of Food". Originally written on Feb 02, 2010 at 01:13PMmore
Michael Pollan was preaching to the converted with me on this one. But it's pleasant to be able to read a book and agree with every word. A quick read.more
A quick little read that is slightly humorous. He boils his advice down to seven words that focus on three things. "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly Plants."Eat real food not processed crap.Use rules to help control your eating habits.Focus on plants and not meat.more
This brief volume expands on Michael Pollan's mantra - eat food, not too much, mostly plants - with a series of easily understood and often amusing rules. These rules are the distilled common sense of the many people who wrote to Pollan. Some have short explanations but this is definitely not a scientic treatise on nutrition.more
This book didn't really teach me anything I hadn't read before, but it was aesthetically pleasing and I enjoyed the list like format.more
Super straightforward approach to eating in the modern world. 64 rules, the last of which is that sometimes it's ok to break the rules (phew!). Terrific to share with grades 3 and up.more
I was quite upset when I received this book. It is just a concise version of In Defense of Food (which I had already read). So, if you want to skip the longer version of the book, than this is the book to get. If you want to get more from a book than rules on eating - don't get this book.more
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