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In 1978, Stephen King introduced the world to the last gunslinger, Roland of Gilead.  Nothing has been the same since. More than twenty years later, the quest for the Dark Tower continues to take readers on a wildly epic ride. Through parallel worlds and across time, Roland must brave desolate wastelands and endless deserts, drifting into the unimaginable and the familiar. A classic tale of colossal scope—crossing over terrain from The Stand, The Eyes of the Dragon, Insomnia, The Talisman, Black House, Hearts in Atlantis, ’Salem’s Lot, and other familiar King haunts—the adventure takes hold with the turn of each page.

And the tower awaits....

The Second Volume in the Epic Dark Tower Series…

The Drawing of the Three


While pursuing his quest for the Dark Tower through a world that is a nightmarishly distorted mirror image of our own, Roland is drawn through a mysterious door that brings him into contemporary America.

Here he links forces with the defiant young Eddie Dean, and with the beautiful, brilliant, and brave Odetta Holmes, in a savage struggle against underworld evil and otherworldly enemies.

Once again, Stephen King has masterfully interwoven dark, evocative fantasy and icy realism.
Published: Penguin Group on Aug 5, 2003
ISBN: 9781101146422
List price: $8.99
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The Gunslinger was a surreal fantasy which, to be honest, was quite hard work. The fact that there are answers available, from questions left unanswered in the first book, make The Drawing of the Three rather irresistible. The good news is Drawing is a thoroughly different style. The surreality is still there; King has a clear idea of how this other world exists. That said, this book features no more than a single stretch of beach, yet at no point labours it's points. The lack of otherworldly scenario is compensated by three Earth bound stories as the Gunslinger forms his 'company', for that is all that occurs in Drawing - it is the creation of a fellowship which (presumably) will fuel the next four books. The initial Drawing, the addition of a junkie to the Gunslinger's cause is superbly written. Carl Hiaasen-esque with a Tarentino twist - you'll be absolutely transfixed by it. The rest of the novel never lives up to that chapter, but it's all good none-the-less. Fate (ka) ensures the book doesn't seem like separate stories, with the beach as a strong link between each. The plotting of Drawing is excellent. Enough praise for this one - just go and read it!read more
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This is one of my favorites of the "Dark Tower" series. I just love how he gets to meet his new companions and their background stories on the road to the dark tower.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Drawing of the three is the second book in the Dark Tower series. King moves from the western genre to a more sci-fi feel as the protagonist Roland moves between his world and different time periods in ours to draw the three people he will need to complete his quest. The crossing of time lines creates paradoxes with the storyline in the previous book, and even Roland momentarily wonders if he has screwed up his own time line (but decides that he doesn't care.) This book feels less cold, and more personal, than the first book did.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

The Gunslinger was a surreal fantasy which, to be honest, was quite hard work. The fact that there are answers available, from questions left unanswered in the first book, make The Drawing of the Three rather irresistible. The good news is Drawing is a thoroughly different style. The surreality is still there; King has a clear idea of how this other world exists. That said, this book features no more than a single stretch of beach, yet at no point labours it's points. The lack of otherworldly scenario is compensated by three Earth bound stories as the Gunslinger forms his 'company', for that is all that occurs in Drawing - it is the creation of a fellowship which (presumably) will fuel the next four books. The initial Drawing, the addition of a junkie to the Gunslinger's cause is superbly written. Carl Hiaasen-esque with a Tarentino twist - you'll be absolutely transfixed by it. The rest of the novel never lives up to that chapter, but it's all good none-the-less. Fate (ka) ensures the book doesn't seem like separate stories, with the beach as a strong link between each. The plotting of Drawing is excellent. Enough praise for this one - just go and read it!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is one of my favorites of the "Dark Tower" series. I just love how he gets to meet his new companions and their background stories on the road to the dark tower.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Drawing of the three is the second book in the Dark Tower series. King moves from the western genre to a more sci-fi feel as the protagonist Roland moves between his world and different time periods in ours to draw the three people he will need to complete his quest. The crossing of time lines creates paradoxes with the storyline in the previous book, and even Roland momentarily wonders if he has screwed up his own time line (but decides that he doesn't care.) This book feels less cold, and more personal, than the first book did.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"The Drawing of the Three" is the second book in Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series. The story continues following Roland, the last Gunslinger, on his quest towards the Dark Tower in Stephen King's vision of an epic fantasy.As Roland continues his journey he must leave his world - a different world known from the first book, "The Gunslinger" - into our world. This is one of the different aspects from the first; the story does not take place in the fantasy world as much as it takes place in a world all too familiar for many readers.The different worlds provide a sense of connection for the reader, as well as feelings of humor. Roland struggles to grasp many aspects of our life - for example Roland is familiar with apothecaries in his world, who are more like mystics and run a dimly lit potion shop. In one of his adventures, he enters a drugstore expecting "a dim, candle-lit room full of bitter fumes, jars of unknown powers and liquids and philters," and is taken aback when he sees the brightly lit drugstore familiar in our world.Different, yes. Interesting? Very. As Roland "draws the Three," King introduces new characters and an intriguing, elaborate story that will surely leave the reader gripping the pages tightly. Where "The Gunslinger" was slower paced in some areas, "The Drawing of the Three" keeps the reader rapidly turning the pages with very little downtime. However, the Plume publication of 2003 leaves a little to be desired in the formatting of the illustrations and the text. The text and illustrations do not match up - being at least several pages off, resulting in more of a hindrance than anything.For those who read "The Gunslinger", this is obviously the next step in the story. If "The Gunslinger" was enjoyed, this will only further pique interest in the story. For those that read "The Gunslinger" and are unsure if the story is worth going on - this book will quickly change that feeling of unsureness and bring the reader further into King's epic fantasy world.
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In the second book in the Dark Tower series we pick up with Roland on the beach just after the end of the events in The Gunslinger. A series of misfortunes leads the gunslinger down the coast and into the process of Drawing his new companions: The Prisoner, The Lady of shadows and Death “But not for you Gunslinger”. The shadow of death hangs over the gunslinger in this story that feels at times like the greasiest of crime novels while still maintaining that bizarre element of the fantastic that sets the Dark tower series apart.
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The second in the Dark Tower series is less about Roland's world and more about ours. Roland's commentaries of our world are insightful and fun. King is an older in this book in the series and it shows, but I still feel this book is missing an overall message. There's a bunch of interesting stuff, but overall it doesn't sum up to a coherent message. A fun read nonetheless.
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