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The landmark exploration of economic prosperity and how the world can escape from extreme poverty for the world's poorest citizens, from one  of the world's most renowned economists

Hailed by Time as one of the world's hundred most influential people, Jeffrey D. Sachs is renowned for his work around the globe advising economies in crisis. Now a classic of its genre, The End of Poverty distills more than thirty years of experience to offer a uniquely informed vision of the steps that can transform impoverished countries into prosperous ones. Marrying vivid storytelling with rigorous analysis, Sachs lays out a clear conceptual map of the world economy. Explaining his own work in Bolivia, Russia, India, China, and Africa, he offers an integrated set of solutions to the interwoven economic, political, environmental, and social problems that challenge the world's poorest countries.
 
Ten years after its initial publication, The End of Poverty remains an indispensible and influential work. In this 10th anniversary edition, Sachs presents an extensive new foreword assessing the progress of the past decade, the work that remains to be done, and how each of us can help. He also looks ahead across the next fifteen years to 2030, the United Nations' target date for ending extreme poverty, offering new insights and recommendations.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Published: Penguin Group on Feb 28, 2006
ISBN: 9781101643280
List price: $14.99
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I liked this book for getting fairly straight to the point, clearly and with plenty of credibility. The causes of poverty can be solved, according to Sachs, who brings in his own experience in solving seemingly hopeless problems with sound economic solutions. He shows how things have improved, how things could improve, and I think best of all, Sachs gives his opinion as to why developed nations are deadlocked in acting charitably.

It's on that last point though that I think, I'm afraid, the author's solution may be a long time coming (if it ever does.) Sachs sees liberal markets as a solution to poverty, but doesn't even bring up the possibility that such markets are also a hinderance to charity. It's to the point of being obvious now that financially supporting development in places like Africa is an *investment* as it creates new trading partners in the long run, but no one wants to pay the initial cost. It's the same reason stifling the environmentalist movement, everyone agrees that there's an ethical necessity but being ethical bears a cost, and individuals and companies tread water because they don't want to be the only ones taking a hit by being good (ethics are good, but not as good as profits, we know.)

Which is why I much preferred and recommend How to Spend $50 Billion..., which carries a very similar message, but makes a sharper argument on how to pull a realistic economic development plan off.read more
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This is quite a brilliant book, in my opinion. Jeffrey makes the case for the end of poverty quite powerfully, and in the first half of the book, I was quite captivated by his analysis. I thought that this was quite brilliant. I am reading the book seven years after it was published. The rich countries have become not so rich, and econoies like India and China seem to be losing a bit of their steam.India's problems are due to it's cranky politics, and China seems to have some systemic issues. Europe is in trouble, and can Europe now save the poor countries? Therefore, in the second half of the book, where he proposes solutions, while I do not disagree with him, the question is - are there issues that have been glossed over? Are the proposals too simplistic? or, are they indeed so blindlingly obvious that we miss them?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I finally finished it! Only took me 4 months or more.

As readable as it is, it's a tough-going book. A lot of stats and number-crunching, which is challenging for me.

The book provides a comprehensive perspective of poverty causes and solutions around the world. Heavy on the economics, of course because it is written by an economist. Despairing and yet hopeful. Poverty can be ended. We currently have all the resources necessary; we just have to use them properly.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

I liked this book for getting fairly straight to the point, clearly and with plenty of credibility. The causes of poverty can be solved, according to Sachs, who brings in his own experience in solving seemingly hopeless problems with sound economic solutions. He shows how things have improved, how things could improve, and I think best of all, Sachs gives his opinion as to why developed nations are deadlocked in acting charitably.

It's on that last point though that I think, I'm afraid, the author's solution may be a long time coming (if it ever does.) Sachs sees liberal markets as a solution to poverty, but doesn't even bring up the possibility that such markets are also a hinderance to charity. It's to the point of being obvious now that financially supporting development in places like Africa is an *investment* as it creates new trading partners in the long run, but no one wants to pay the initial cost. It's the same reason stifling the environmentalist movement, everyone agrees that there's an ethical necessity but being ethical bears a cost, and individuals and companies tread water because they don't want to be the only ones taking a hit by being good (ethics are good, but not as good as profits, we know.)

Which is why I much preferred and recommend How to Spend $50 Billion..., which carries a very similar message, but makes a sharper argument on how to pull a realistic economic development plan off.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is quite a brilliant book, in my opinion. Jeffrey makes the case for the end of poverty quite powerfully, and in the first half of the book, I was quite captivated by his analysis. I thought that this was quite brilliant. I am reading the book seven years after it was published. The rich countries have become not so rich, and econoies like India and China seem to be losing a bit of their steam.India's problems are due to it's cranky politics, and China seems to have some systemic issues. Europe is in trouble, and can Europe now save the poor countries? Therefore, in the second half of the book, where he proposes solutions, while I do not disagree with him, the question is - are there issues that have been glossed over? Are the proposals too simplistic? or, are they indeed so blindlingly obvious that we miss them?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I finally finished it! Only took me 4 months or more.

As readable as it is, it's a tough-going book. A lot of stats and number-crunching, which is challenging for me.

The book provides a comprehensive perspective of poverty causes and solutions around the world. Heavy on the economics, of course because it is written by an economist. Despairing and yet hopeful. Poverty can be ended. We currently have all the resources necessary; we just have to use them properly.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Though Jeffrey Sachs is considered by some to be a paradigmatic neoliberal, I nonetheless think this is a great book, and now look forward to reading Naomi Klein's Shock Doctrine, as Sachs admits throughout the book to having strongly advocated for economic "shock" policies (for Bolivia, Poland, etc.). I find his idea of "clinical economics" very interesting, though under-developed. What scares me about it is that approaching politics and society through the lens that a) is drawn from curing disease is problematic, and b) human society, action and interaction is fundamentally from the chemical/biological processes that occur in the human body.Nonetheless, the majority of Sachs' recommendations as to how economists should reconsider their practice are quite sensible.
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this and Muhammad Yunnus Banker to the Poor are two must read economic developement books.only complaint is that Bono from U2 opened up. I hate U2.
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Read for class.

Sachs' ideas are becoming so commonplace in discussions of modern development that it would be foolhardy not to read him. His advocacy of 'shock therapy' in economics controversial at best, and I won't go into detail about it here.

I am very impressed with some of his ideas about how geography impacts development (similar to some of the ideas mentioned in Guns Germs and Steel) and how each government should increase aid with simple technological solutions, but again, some are dreck.

Development theory is an incredibly vague term, and people are wary of donating money if it is wasted instead of used for a quantifiable and demonstrable good.

The section about persuading Western governments has some merit, and it is indeed shocking to realize that the U.S. government spends so comparatively little on aid compared to its neighbors. Private citizens and non-profit charities donate more than the government in this area.

I would have liked a section discussing The Middle East - a glaring omission.

The author also doesn't seem to lend himself to allowing his critics a voice, even if to refute them later. He merely passes over them in silence. Ah well. His ideas have some truth to them, even though they have many flaws.
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