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The second book in Marie Lu’s New York Times bestselling LEGEND trilogy—perfect for fans of THE HUNGER GAMES and DIVERGENT!

June and Day arrive in Vegas just as the unthinkable happens: the Elector Primo dies, and his son Anden takes his place. With the Republic edging closer to chaos, the two join a group of Patriot rebels eager to help Day rescue his brother and offer passage to the Colonies. They have only one request—June and Day must assassinate the new Elector.

It’s their chance to change the nation, to give voice to a people silenced for too long. 

But as June realizes this Elector is nothing like his father, she’s haunted by the choice ahead. What if Anden is a new beginning? What if revolution must be more than loss and vengeance, anger and blood—what if the Patriots are wrong?

In this highly-anticipated sequel to the New York Times bestseller Legend, Lu delivers a breathtaking thriller with high stakes and cinematic action. 

 

"Masterful." —The Los Angeles Times

"Lu's action-packed series is the real deal." Entertainment Weekly 



From the Trade Paperback edition.
Published: Penguin Group on
ISBN: 9781101607848
List price: $9.99
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In Beneath the Wheel, Hesse creates a portrait of a life brought to devastation by the negative effects of institutionalized learning. The apex of this devastation is beautifully rendered with the rich imagery anchored in nature and melancholy that is typical of his writing. Though a good novel, it falls short of Hesse's best work. Themes that merely incubate here are executed with far greater depth in Narcissus and Goldmund, as well as in The Glass Bead Game. Having read those works, this novel provided good context for Hesse's development as a storyteller.more
It is worth reading this alongside Hesse's collection of short stories gathered under the title 'Autobiographical Writings'. Hesse's real academic career was quite a train-wreck, and his recollection of the very short conversation he had with his rather severe Grandfather about it is priceless. On another note, I'm not sure I've ever read such a powerful description of life becoming (slipping into) death; all the more effective for the obliquity and the unexpectedness of the moment. What's more, with just a very few words Hesse captures that strange fleeting period preceding the arrival of news of a death. When I worked with traffic police years ago they would talk about how in the middle of the night they'd find themselves carrying but not yet delivering the news of a death, and the sense that for a little while someone still slept in their beds undisturbed; their loved ones, children, partners or parents both still alive and dead at the same time. This isn't perhaps Hesse's major work, but there is a beautiful light touch to the writing, a sense of restrained power in this story simply told. Recommended.more
I had not heard of this book by Hesse, and I stumbled on this by accident. It is quite a brilliant book. You go along with the short life of the young hero, from the point where he is selected to go to the university, his friendship, his falling out with the "establishment"; his nervous breakdown and eventual death. The writing is very low key, and there are parts that I can sympathise and identify with. While the writing style is low key, I recognise the malaise that still afflicts us today, how the "system" can break you down unless you know how to play ir, or unless you rebel. Rebellion, however, is not normally encouraged..more
Hesse takes on parents' expectations and education without personal growth in this early novel of his. There is a little of Hesse's life in every one of his novels. Great as all of his works are.more
I loved reading this book. I completely disagree with many of the industrial methods STILL used today in our educational system and find that the methods can cause severe and unnecessary anxiety making the learning process a very unenjoyable experience. I have never read a story like this before.more
I've adored Hesse since I read "Narcissus and Goldmund." This semi-autobiographical book is supposed to give good insight into Hesse as an artist and is the key to understanding his subsequent works. As usual, I found it beautifully written and insightful, a wonder that he's fallen out of favor in the canon.more
Hesse's lyrical yet uncomplicated language (even in translation) provides a sensitive and beautiful examination of nature's triumphant reclamation of a failed academic. A heartbreaking and humane study of archetypes set against a brilliantly rendered landscape, this is a dark and gentle story inviting patience and reflection. Excellent.more
A dark tale of a student pushed to the brink. Early treatment of themes Hesse will repeat; academics vs. spirit and death by water the most obvious.more
The blurb on the book's back cover describes this work as the "touchstone" in Hesse's "lifelong examination of the conflict between self-affirmation and self-destruction." But the promotional blurb doesn't really do the book justice. It's also a touching and insightful tale of a young man's struggle to find his place in society. Most readers will undoubtedly find some twists in Hans Giebenrath's personal odyssey oddly familiar. The story moves along at a nice clip, introducing credible characters in situations that are as relevant today as they were a century ago.more
Read all 11 reviews

Reviews

In Beneath the Wheel, Hesse creates a portrait of a life brought to devastation by the negative effects of institutionalized learning. The apex of this devastation is beautifully rendered with the rich imagery anchored in nature and melancholy that is typical of his writing. Though a good novel, it falls short of Hesse's best work. Themes that merely incubate here are executed with far greater depth in Narcissus and Goldmund, as well as in The Glass Bead Game. Having read those works, this novel provided good context for Hesse's development as a storyteller.more
It is worth reading this alongside Hesse's collection of short stories gathered under the title 'Autobiographical Writings'. Hesse's real academic career was quite a train-wreck, and his recollection of the very short conversation he had with his rather severe Grandfather about it is priceless. On another note, I'm not sure I've ever read such a powerful description of life becoming (slipping into) death; all the more effective for the obliquity and the unexpectedness of the moment. What's more, with just a very few words Hesse captures that strange fleeting period preceding the arrival of news of a death. When I worked with traffic police years ago they would talk about how in the middle of the night they'd find themselves carrying but not yet delivering the news of a death, and the sense that for a little while someone still slept in their beds undisturbed; their loved ones, children, partners or parents both still alive and dead at the same time. This isn't perhaps Hesse's major work, but there is a beautiful light touch to the writing, a sense of restrained power in this story simply told. Recommended.more
I had not heard of this book by Hesse, and I stumbled on this by accident. It is quite a brilliant book. You go along with the short life of the young hero, from the point where he is selected to go to the university, his friendship, his falling out with the "establishment"; his nervous breakdown and eventual death. The writing is very low key, and there are parts that I can sympathise and identify with. While the writing style is low key, I recognise the malaise that still afflicts us today, how the "system" can break you down unless you know how to play ir, or unless you rebel. Rebellion, however, is not normally encouraged..more
Hesse takes on parents' expectations and education without personal growth in this early novel of his. There is a little of Hesse's life in every one of his novels. Great as all of his works are.more
I loved reading this book. I completely disagree with many of the industrial methods STILL used today in our educational system and find that the methods can cause severe and unnecessary anxiety making the learning process a very unenjoyable experience. I have never read a story like this before.more
I've adored Hesse since I read "Narcissus and Goldmund." This semi-autobiographical book is supposed to give good insight into Hesse as an artist and is the key to understanding his subsequent works. As usual, I found it beautifully written and insightful, a wonder that he's fallen out of favor in the canon.more
Hesse's lyrical yet uncomplicated language (even in translation) provides a sensitive and beautiful examination of nature's triumphant reclamation of a failed academic. A heartbreaking and humane study of archetypes set against a brilliantly rendered landscape, this is a dark and gentle story inviting patience and reflection. Excellent.more
A dark tale of a student pushed to the brink. Early treatment of themes Hesse will repeat; academics vs. spirit and death by water the most obvious.more
The blurb on the book's back cover describes this work as the "touchstone" in Hesse's "lifelong examination of the conflict between self-affirmation and self-destruction." But the promotional blurb doesn't really do the book justice. It's also a touching and insightful tale of a young man's struggle to find his place in society. Most readers will undoubtedly find some twists in Hans Giebenrath's personal odyssey oddly familiar. The story moves along at a nice clip, introducing credible characters in situations that are as relevant today as they were a century ago.more
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