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What do suicidal pandas, doped-up rock stars, and a naked Pamela Anderson have in common? They’re all a heck of a lot more interesting than reading about predicate nominatives and hyphens. June Casagrande knows this and has invented a whole new twist on the grammar book. Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies is a laugh-out-loud funny collection of anecdotes and essays on grammar and punctuation, as well as hilarious critiques of the self-appointed language experts.

Chapters include:

  • I’m Writing This While Naked—The Oh-So Steamy Predicate Nominative

  • Semicolonoscopy—Colons, Semicolons, Dashes, and Other Probing Annoyances

  • I’ll Take "I Feel Like a Moron" for $200, Alex—When to Put Punctuation Inside Quotation Marks

  • Snobbery Up with Which You Should Not Put Up—Prepositions

  • Is That a Dangler in Your Memo or Are You Just Glad to See Me?

  • Hyphens—Life-Sucking, Mom-and-Apple-Pie-Hating, Mime-Loving, Nerd-Fight-Inciting Daggers of the Damned

Casagrande delivers practical and fun language lessons not found anywhere else, demystifying the subject and taking it back from the snobs. In short, it’s a grammar book people will actually want to read—just for the fun of it.

Published: Penguin Group on Mar 28, 2006
ISBN: 9781101221389
List price: $12.99
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This is the only grammar book I've read that has made me do a spit-take. (I probably would have done more but I commenced a plan of not drinking and reading following the incident.) It's humor is relaxing and the grammar tips are useful and understandable. My only caveat is that the humor is aimed toward an older, less-easily-offended audience.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I picked this book up after a discussion with a friend over the word "unique." Is unique absolute or are there degrees of uniqueness that require modifiers? "so unique" "not as unique" "very unique" etc....The question on my mind was "am I grammar snob?" After reading this I would say no. It is clear that I have several language pet peeves, but I am not the stickler or "jerkwad" the language elites are. Even if you do follow all the rules it isn't necessary to be constantly correcting everyone unless you are their editor.A light and funny read that still mangages to cover all the grammar rules in an understandable way and also urges you to forget them all. I already have.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One of the most fun reads in the world for a word lover is a book about grammar. (Really!) This is great fun.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Humorous guide to proper grammar and when it's ok to break the rules. Much dissing of famous grammar snobs ensues. I recommend for all grammar snobs, and those who love them.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Well, there was some interesting/useful information in this book, but overall the humor just fell flat and was really annoying. Either the author thought she is much funnier than she is, or she was trying too hard, or maybe she's just not funny. In any event, it didn't work for me.

So grammar snobs are meanies, but to fight them back non-grammar-snobberians (I don't know what you would call them) should learn grammar so they can be equally obnoxious right back at them? Whatevs.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I totally loved this book. (Thumbs nose at The Elements of Style) It's easy for the layperson to read and understand, and has helped with confidence and writing. Definitely give it a try!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Casagrande employs some clever puns and jokes to castigate grammar "snobs" and demonstrate why and how using correct grammar is not so difficult (and sometimes, not so important). Unfortunately, she reminds me of someone who has been drinking too much: too often she overuses an idea or theme that she finds humorous (but nobody else does, at least not after the first time it is used). In the end, she hasn't really said much at all. She does finally get down to business in [only] one chapter - her penultimate - in which, purporting to present an excerpt from "Satan's Dictionary", she delineates "words designed to torment and confuse...." But the torment is all hers, since she insists on repeatedly adding in italics, "I am Satan!" after way too many of the otherwise welcome short entries. The chapter comprises, for me, a microcosm of the whole book: the same gag is beat to death until the reader is more irritated than amused. My recommendation? Read the pun-y chapter titles and skip the book. (JAF)(JAB Review): It's actually better than my wife asseverates. She read the book in too few sittings. This genre, if it is to be enjoyed at all, must be sipped, not gulped. Then you don't realize how repetitive it is. The penultimate chapter is more extensive and up-to-date than the analogous chapter in Strunk and White. In addition, the author points out several issues where The Chicago Manual of Style (my Bible, but only because of institutional loyalty) differs from the Associated Press Stylebook, or where, as we U. of Chicago alums say, the Associated Press is illiterate. Cassagrande can be a little trying, but give her credit for coming up with the ultimate generic title for most grammar and usage books, "The Author of This Book Is Your Superior in Every Way and You're Not Smart Enough to Know He's Talking Down to You"--I know titles are supposed to be italicized, but LibraryThing doesn't accommodate italics. Replace the words "Author of This Book" with "Holder of This Diploma," and you have decoded the unwritten content of every framed and mounted diploma you see in the offices of physicians, lawyers, and beauticians. (JAB)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Hilarious book written by a Simpsons fan that gives an Orwellian view of grammar. It's as enjoyable as a book on grammar can be.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The last chapter is the best in the entire book-this hillarious look at grammar, grammar rules, and why ending a sentence with a prepositition is now something up with which I shall put. Just because of the greater range in topics and the intended audience, I prefered this one to Eats, Shoots and Leaves.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I majored in English in college. So perhaps it is no surprise that I enjoyed a book which is, essentially, about grammar. (I don’t claim to use all of the information contained in said book correctly. I am not a grammar snob. So there.) I have actually enjoyed two books about grammar, but we’re only talking about one of them at the moment. I think that June Casagrande used many of her newspaper columns to make up this book. (She writes a grammar column.) The chapters are short, and while this suits the subject matter, it also suits the length a newspaper column would be. Each chapter is nicely contained and can be read really in any order, though some of them do reference prior chapters. They also contain wonderfully humorous snippets and chapter titles such as: * “I’ll take ‘I Feel Like A Moron’ for $200, Alex” * “I’m Writing This While Naked” * “Do you know what a question mark is? If you don’t, then you can’t understand the last sentence, which means you’re no longer reading, which means the only people still reading are the ones who don’t need question marks defined.” * and “…a team of Santa Monica [police] officers stormed into a crime scene and ordered several suspects to make love on the floor.”It’s a truly amusing book for those who are willing to accept that they might not always use proper grammar. (I don’t.) Also, if you consider yourself a grammar snob (or, as Lynne Truss of Eats, Shoots & Leaves puts it, a “stickler”) who wants to be better than those of us who don’t know how to properly use transitive verbs, you may want to avoid this book. Because as the title suggests, this book is for the average person who wants a better – and humorous – grasp of the English language.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

This is the only grammar book I've read that has made me do a spit-take. (I probably would have done more but I commenced a plan of not drinking and reading following the incident.) It's humor is relaxing and the grammar tips are useful and understandable. My only caveat is that the humor is aimed toward an older, less-easily-offended audience.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I picked this book up after a discussion with a friend over the word "unique." Is unique absolute or are there degrees of uniqueness that require modifiers? "so unique" "not as unique" "very unique" etc....The question on my mind was "am I grammar snob?" After reading this I would say no. It is clear that I have several language pet peeves, but I am not the stickler or "jerkwad" the language elites are. Even if you do follow all the rules it isn't necessary to be constantly correcting everyone unless you are their editor.A light and funny read that still mangages to cover all the grammar rules in an understandable way and also urges you to forget them all. I already have.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One of the most fun reads in the world for a word lover is a book about grammar. (Really!) This is great fun.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Humorous guide to proper grammar and when it's ok to break the rules. Much dissing of famous grammar snobs ensues. I recommend for all grammar snobs, and those who love them.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Well, there was some interesting/useful information in this book, but overall the humor just fell flat and was really annoying. Either the author thought she is much funnier than she is, or she was trying too hard, or maybe she's just not funny. In any event, it didn't work for me.

So grammar snobs are meanies, but to fight them back non-grammar-snobberians (I don't know what you would call them) should learn grammar so they can be equally obnoxious right back at them? Whatevs.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I totally loved this book. (Thumbs nose at The Elements of Style) It's easy for the layperson to read and understand, and has helped with confidence and writing. Definitely give it a try!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Casagrande employs some clever puns and jokes to castigate grammar "snobs" and demonstrate why and how using correct grammar is not so difficult (and sometimes, not so important). Unfortunately, she reminds me of someone who has been drinking too much: too often she overuses an idea or theme that she finds humorous (but nobody else does, at least not after the first time it is used). In the end, she hasn't really said much at all. She does finally get down to business in [only] one chapter - her penultimate - in which, purporting to present an excerpt from "Satan's Dictionary", she delineates "words designed to torment and confuse...." But the torment is all hers, since she insists on repeatedly adding in italics, "I am Satan!" after way too many of the otherwise welcome short entries. The chapter comprises, for me, a microcosm of the whole book: the same gag is beat to death until the reader is more irritated than amused. My recommendation? Read the pun-y chapter titles and skip the book. (JAF)(JAB Review): It's actually better than my wife asseverates. She read the book in too few sittings. This genre, if it is to be enjoyed at all, must be sipped, not gulped. Then you don't realize how repetitive it is. The penultimate chapter is more extensive and up-to-date than the analogous chapter in Strunk and White. In addition, the author points out several issues where The Chicago Manual of Style (my Bible, but only because of institutional loyalty) differs from the Associated Press Stylebook, or where, as we U. of Chicago alums say, the Associated Press is illiterate. Cassagrande can be a little trying, but give her credit for coming up with the ultimate generic title for most grammar and usage books, "The Author of This Book Is Your Superior in Every Way and You're Not Smart Enough to Know He's Talking Down to You"--I know titles are supposed to be italicized, but LibraryThing doesn't accommodate italics. Replace the words "Author of This Book" with "Holder of This Diploma," and you have decoded the unwritten content of every framed and mounted diploma you see in the offices of physicians, lawyers, and beauticians. (JAB)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Hilarious book written by a Simpsons fan that gives an Orwellian view of grammar. It's as enjoyable as a book on grammar can be.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The last chapter is the best in the entire book-this hillarious look at grammar, grammar rules, and why ending a sentence with a prepositition is now something up with which I shall put. Just because of the greater range in topics and the intended audience, I prefered this one to Eats, Shoots and Leaves.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I majored in English in college. So perhaps it is no surprise that I enjoyed a book which is, essentially, about grammar. (I don’t claim to use all of the information contained in said book correctly. I am not a grammar snob. So there.) I have actually enjoyed two books about grammar, but we’re only talking about one of them at the moment. I think that June Casagrande used many of her newspaper columns to make up this book. (She writes a grammar column.) The chapters are short, and while this suits the subject matter, it also suits the length a newspaper column would be. Each chapter is nicely contained and can be read really in any order, though some of them do reference prior chapters. They also contain wonderfully humorous snippets and chapter titles such as: * “I’ll take ‘I Feel Like A Moron’ for $200, Alex” * “I’m Writing This While Naked” * “Do you know what a question mark is? If you don’t, then you can’t understand the last sentence, which means you’re no longer reading, which means the only people still reading are the ones who don’t need question marks defined.” * and “…a team of Santa Monica [police] officers stormed into a crime scene and ordered several suspects to make love on the floor.”It’s a truly amusing book for those who are willing to accept that they might not always use proper grammar. (I don’t.) Also, if you consider yourself a grammar snob (or, as Lynne Truss of Eats, Shoots & Leaves puts it, a “stickler”) who wants to be better than those of us who don’t know how to properly use transitive verbs, you may want to avoid this book. Because as the title suggests, this book is for the average person who wants a better – and humorous – grasp of the English language.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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