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#1 New York Times Bestseller

Food. There's plenty of it around, and we all love to eat it. So why should anyone need to defend it?

Because in the so-called Western diet, food has been replaced by nutrients, and common sense by confusion--most of what we’re consuming today is longer the product of nature but of food science. The result is what Michael Pollan calls the American Paradox: The more we worry about nutrition, the less healthy we see to become. With In Defense of Food, Pollan proposes a new (and very old) answer to the question of what we should eat that comes down to seven simple but liberating words: "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." Pollan’s bracing and eloquent manifesto shows us how we can start making thoughtful food choices that will enrich our lives, enlarge our sense of what it means to be healthy, and bring pleasure back to eating.

"Michael Pollan [is the] designated repository for the nation's food conscience."
-Frank Bruni, The New York Times

" A remarkable volume . . . engrossing . . . [Pollan] offers those prescriptions Americans so desperately crave."
-The Washington Post

"A tough, witty, cogent rebuttal to the proposition that food can be redced to its nutritional components without the loss of something essential... [a] lively, invaluable book."
--Janet Maslin, The New York Times

"In Defense of Food is written with Pollan's customary bite, ringing clarity and brilliance at connecting the dots."
-The Seattle Times


Michael Pollan’s newest book Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation--the story of our most trusted food expert’s culinary education--was published by The Penguin Press in April 2013.
Published: Penguin Group on Jan 1, 2008
ISBN: 9781101147382
List price: $12.99
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It takes 20 minutes to register that one is full- so therefore the French method of eating small amounts slowly succeeds as a dietary measure.Animals fed green leaves, grass are healthier- so we need to eat animals fed so. We only need a small amount of B-12 from animal sources. Therefore use meat to flavor.Avoid refined flour and sugar. Favor green leaves over meat and seeds. (Improve the balance ofread more
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This book changed the way I look at food, eating, and nutrition. Excellent and highly recommended!read more
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I read this before I read Omnivore’s Dilemma. The whole book can be summed up with the phrases circling the lettuce on the cover: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.read more
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It takes 20 minutes to register that one is full- so therefore the French method of eating small amounts slowly succeeds as a dietary measure.Animals fed green leaves, grass are healthier- so we need to eat animals fed so. We only need a small amount of B-12 from animal sources. Therefore use meat to flavor.Avoid refined flour and sugar. Favor green leaves over meat and seeds. (Improve the balance of
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book changed the way I look at food, eating, and nutrition. Excellent and highly recommended!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this before I read Omnivore’s Dilemma. The whole book can be summed up with the phrases circling the lettuce on the cover: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.
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The information is fascinating, but can make for dry reading. The audiotape version is entertaining and informative--much easier to handle. Lots of data, which gets lost in the reading, but sticks with the listening.
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In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto is Michael Pollan's follow-up to his book, The Omnivore's Dilemma. The slogan on the front cover - "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants" - pretty much sums up the primary thesis of In Defense of Food. The book is divided into three parts. The first part discusses "nutritionism," which Pollan defines as the "science" of breaking food down into it's parts - nutrients - and the ways in which this has effected the (mostly) American diet. By focusing on individual nutrients rather than whole foods, we lose sight of the interplay of all the potential health benefits that come from all parts of food. It also enables food companies to add individual nutrients to food and market those foods as somehow being almost medicinal rather than nourishing. The second part of the book deals with the industrialization of food, diet fads, and the diseases of the 20th and 21st century. Pollan traces the recent history of food, following it's path from whole foods to refined, from quality to quantity, from food culture to food science. And in the last part of the book, Pollan offers some ideas about how to eat healthfully and wholly - to redevelop a healthy food culture.Once again, Pollan does an excellent job of looking at the way that Americans experience food and develops some common-sense approaches to eating today. In Defense of Foodis not as "meaty" as The Omnivore's Dilemma, and in some ways covers the same ground, but Pollan also offers some good ideas about how to negotiate the marketing and pseudo-science we see every day in the grocery store. One of the tips I liked best: Eat foods that your grandmother (or someone's grandmother) would recognize. In other words, eat tofu, but tread carefully around all the new "wonder foods" with soy protein added. Eat bread, but read the ingredient listing to make sure that your grandmother would recognize them all. And, of course, eat your vegetables!
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½ brocoli variety: Marathonmajority chicken: Cornish cross hybrid
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