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One of the New York Times Book Review's Ten Best Books of the Year

Winner of the James Beard Award

Author of #1 New York Times Bestsellers In Defense of Food and Food Rules


Today, buffeted by one food fad after another, America is suffering from what can only be described as a national eating disorder. Will it be fast food tonight, or something organic? Or perhaps something we grew ourselves? The question of what to have for dinner has confronted us since man discovered fire. But as Michael Pollan explains in this revolutionary book, how we answer it now, as the dawn of the twenty-first century, may determine our survival as a species. Packed with profound surprises, The Omnivore's Dilemma is changing the way Americans thing about the politics, perils, and pleasures of eating.

"Thoughtful, engrossing ... You're not likely to get a better explanation of exactly where your food comes from."
-The New York Times Book Review

"An eater's manifesto ... [Pollan's] cause is just, his thinking is clear, and his writing is compelling. Be careful of your dinner!"
-The Washington Post

"Outstanding... a wide-ranging invitation to think through the moral ramifications of our eating habits."
--The New Yorker

"If you ever thought 'what's for dinner' was a simple question, you'll change your mind after reading Pollan's searing indictment of today's food industry-and his glimpse of some inspiring alternatives.... I just loved this book so much I didn't want it to end."
-The Seattle Times


Michael Pollan’s newest book Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation--the story of our most trusted food expert’s culinary education--was published by The Penguin Press in April 2013.
Published: Penguin Group on Apr 11, 2006
ISBN: 9781101147177
List price: $14.99
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I read Omnivore's Dilemma at a time at which I was reevaluating my relationship with food: to eat meat or not to eat meat, "local" versus "organic," and a desire to get back to basics with cooking for my family but not really knowing what that meant. I have a tendency to glaze over when I read nonfiction, but I found Pollan's style engaging; I couldn't wait to curl up with this book every night.

This book taught me about the various ways that energy can make its way from the sun to my body and gave voice the issues with which I am grappling in my personal Omnivore's Dilemma. I find myself bringing up this book in conversation on a daily basis. I find myself seeking out farms and researching more carefully the origins of the food I eat, especially the meat. Omnivore's Dilemma has helped me acquire the language and basic understanding I need to feel comfortable seeking such information, from retailers, chefs, and the farmers themselves. I quite enjoyed Fast Food Nation, but it never spurred me to action the way this book has already. I saw myself reflected in the pages of this book, and the image helped me see a path towards a more fulfilling and authentic relationship to my food.

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Very interesting. Between this and Real Food, Good Calorie Bad Calorie, and the Untold Story of Milk - I have a very comprehensive view of our industrial food system and it ain't pretty.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I won't rate this since I really should have read the entire title. I started reading this book and thought it was the second coming of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring! I was involved, intrigued, frightened...and lastly, disappointed. (Thus, my lack of a rating since I was wrong with my expectations!) I WILL, however, think about food in an entirely different light....not necessarily the way Pollan wants me to, but more from a safety issue. I found out that a local man apprenticed with Joel Salatin and will actively pursue its availability. (And, just like our muchroom hunters, I shall not share this information! lol I fear the availability of his product since it is something he is just starting to do!) As for the last hunting, foraging, gathering section after the beginning chapters about the chemical polluting of our environment, I find it strange that Pollan could ignore the possibility that the foraged, gathered, and hunted foods would NOT be contaminated in some way also. I realize now that I had false hopes about this book, but the beginning didn't fall on deaf ears!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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I read Omnivore's Dilemma at a time at which I was reevaluating my relationship with food: to eat meat or not to eat meat, "local" versus "organic," and a desire to get back to basics with cooking for my family but not really knowing what that meant. I have a tendency to glaze over when I read nonfiction, but I found Pollan's style engaging; I couldn't wait to curl up with this book every night.

This book taught me about the various ways that energy can make its way from the sun to my body and gave voice the issues with which I am grappling in my personal Omnivore's Dilemma. I find myself bringing up this book in conversation on a daily basis. I find myself seeking out farms and researching more carefully the origins of the food I eat, especially the meat. Omnivore's Dilemma has helped me acquire the language and basic understanding I need to feel comfortable seeking such information, from retailers, chefs, and the farmers themselves. I quite enjoyed Fast Food Nation, but it never spurred me to action the way this book has already. I saw myself reflected in the pages of this book, and the image helped me see a path towards a more fulfilling and authentic relationship to my food.

Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very interesting. Between this and Real Food, Good Calorie Bad Calorie, and the Untold Story of Milk - I have a very comprehensive view of our industrial food system and it ain't pretty.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I won't rate this since I really should have read the entire title. I started reading this book and thought it was the second coming of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring! I was involved, intrigued, frightened...and lastly, disappointed. (Thus, my lack of a rating since I was wrong with my expectations!) I WILL, however, think about food in an entirely different light....not necessarily the way Pollan wants me to, but more from a safety issue. I found out that a local man apprenticed with Joel Salatin and will actively pursue its availability. (And, just like our muchroom hunters, I shall not share this information! lol I fear the availability of his product since it is something he is just starting to do!) As for the last hunting, foraging, gathering section after the beginning chapters about the chemical polluting of our environment, I find it strange that Pollan could ignore the possibility that the foraged, gathered, and hunted foods would NOT be contaminated in some way also. I realize now that I had false hopes about this book, but the beginning didn't fall on deaf ears!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Though not a quick read, this book is an excellent way to consider your food choices. What does it mean to buy from McDonald's, Whole Foods, or a CSA? Pollan does an excellent job following our food back to the source and explaining all the processes in between. This is a potentially eye-opening book, and is a good read for everyone.
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A lot of work went into this book. Mr. Pollan takes the simple subject of eating and makes it very iteresting.
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This book is a real tour-de-force through the topic of where our food comes from. It is also well-written, and the scholarship feels correct.
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