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A brutal raid on the quiet coastal English village of Hookton in 1342 leaves but one survivor: a young archer named Thomas. On this terrible dawn, his purpose becomes clear -- to recover a stolen sacred relic and pursue to the ends of the earth the murderous black-clad knight bearing a blue-and-yellow standard, a journey that leads him to the courageous rescue of a beautiful French woman, and sets him on his ultimate quest: the search for the Holy Grail.

Published: HarperCollins on Mar 17, 2009
ISBN: 9780061796791
List price: $7.99
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Best line. "Now sir you are dressed to kill."read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Entertaining and informative historical fiction set during the Hundred Years War. As usual, Cornwell makes learning history an enjoyable experience and I recommend any of his books if you have an interest in the periods (usually medieval/napoleonic era but some others as well).read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A well-written, and as far as I can tell, historically accurate account of what it was like to be an archer in the English army around the time of the Battle of Crecy.Two things I always like about Cornwell are the fact that he does his research, and the fact that he is willing to have sympathetic characters on the enemy side.His greatest drawback in this book is that the female characters come over even sketchier than usual. I had very little feeling of Eleanor as a real person.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is my first book by Bernard Cornwell, who is a rather prolific historical fiction writer across various time periods.The Archer's Tale begins in the village of Hookton on the English coast. There, the lance of St. George was kept safely in the rafters of the church - until one day when Frenchmen raided the town and stole the lance. The only surviving villager is a young man, Thomas, the protagonist of the story. His journey leads him into France at the beginning of the Hundred Year's War. He is content as an archer for the king, but slowly, more clues emerge regarding the raid on his village and the history of the stolen artifact, and they seem to lead towards the ultimate of prizes: the holy grail itself.I love historical fiction, but I admit I had trouble getting into this book. Maybe it was the male perspective. Maybe it was the blatant portrayal of rape, including that of a minor character. The viewpoint shifts were annoying at times and seemed to give away too much of the plot. One of the major antagonists of the book dies without much fanfare at all, which seemed anticlimactic. Still, the historical details were intriguing, if sometimes excessive (there was about a two page spread on how early cannons worked, and then they blasted a few times and didn't do much, and that was that). Thomas matured in the course of the book, but I never felt that invested in his survival.I think I'll pick up some of Cornwell's other books on the medieval period, if I find them used and cheap, but I'm not going to run out and buy the rest of this particular series.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Thomas is protecting the Treasure of Hookton, a holy relic, on the eve of Easter when his English village is attacked by the French. The place is ransacked, men murdered, women raped and kidnapped, homes burned, and everything worth stealing, stolen, including the Treasure. In an attempt to save his home, Thomas takes up his bow against the invaders. A son of a priest, Thomas promises his dying father to bring the relic back. He also silently swears to avenge his death.He soon finds himself in the English army marching through France. Smart and very skilled with his bow, he rises fast among the archers. His conscience, in the form of a friend and fellow soldier named Father Hobbes, keeps reminding him of his promise to his father and his god, which Thomas would rather forget. Unfortunately for Thomas, his road to redemption is not easy. He runs afoul of a knight, and in an effort to help a lady, finds himself hanged. He survives and once again finds himself an archer only this time facing enemies he didn't know he had and a large French army wanting very much to kill him.This is my fifth Cornwell novel this year. I like his writing, enjoy the characters immensely, and like the action, which in some way is always attached to an army. While I liked this book, I didn't like it as much as the others I read. No reason really, just didn't get into it as much.Thomas is an engaging character but I felt bad for him the entire time. His family was killed, home wrecked, a friend constantly reminds of any bit of guilt he might feel, and he's not so lucky with the ladies. There is a good villain though, Sir Simon, who has it out for Thomas and a few other characters which make it interesting. There's a lot of information and characters in this book that will obviously feature heavily in the sequel so I'm looking forward to Vagabond to tie up a few loose ends.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read the newest book in this series, 1356, not knowing anything about it. After reading that, I just had to go back to the beginning of Thomas of Hookton's tale. The story is based around the events of the Hundred Years' War that pitted France and England in a long series of skirmishes. It tells the tale of a young man who yearns to get revenge on the soldier who raided his town, killed his father, and stole an ancient relic.The action is fast-paced; the recreation of the battle of Crécy is riveting, and Thomas is a well developed character. Being that this is the beginning of the Grail Quest series, Thomas does seem very confusing at times, but I think that makes him more likable, and the story more entertaining.If you like historical fiction this is a must read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very enjoyable. Hard to put down. Mr Cornwell is a very good writer of historical fiction. I can't wait to start on book two.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It's a very detailed story that almost verges on actual history. Starting with a horrific attack on the small village of Hookton, that leaves almost all the people dead and their holy relic stolen. One of the left behind is Thomas who takes out some of the raiders before they return to their ships and France.He takes the opportunity of the war with France for some vengeance and to find out more about his family and the mystery surrounding the holy relic. He picks up a lot of skill as an archer, a few women and some skills as a leader of men.I liked the story, I want to read more in this series to see how things pan out. Fun, but occasionally too much detail.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
fast paced, great characters and a really interesting plot, one of my favourites so far!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved this book. I've read the Sharpe's series by Cornwell, and the Hundredy Years War has always interested me, so gave this a try. We are introduced to Thomas of Hookton, the great mystery about his origins, and the quest he is set on. We also learn a bit about the longbow, and its use at the Battle of Crecy.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I didn't like this one as much as I liked the Warlord Chronicles, and I never really got to care for the characters, but it was an enjoyable, quick summer read. The historical details were interesting, and although the actual location of the grail and what it was like weren't surprising to me, it was an interesting idea.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An excellent beginning and my first foray into the stories of Bernard Cornwell. Wonderfully written and packed with action. I now require more. :)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Book 1 in the Grail Quest series. Set in the Hundred Years War, The Archer's Tale follows the exploits of Thomas, the son of a priest who witnessed the destruction of his village and killing of his parents by French raiders. Bent on vengeance and a desire to uncover secrets about his family that his father took to the grave, Thomas joins the English military and sets on a course that ends with the epic Battle of Crécy in 1346.In typical Cornwell style, The Archer's Tale includes a healthy dose of authentic history tweaked for story-telling purposes as need (and explained in the author's note at the end). The only thing that really seemed implausible was arranging for all of the protagonists to converge at the same spot and time on the battlefield. Still, it was a well-paced story and a great read for anyone interested in medieval life and warfare.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
From the author of the Richard Sharpe novels. Finally read it and found it a good read. At times it seems to be more about the number of battles & people killed. A lot of death & revenge stuff threaded through it. Please understand I wasn't expecting a moral story set in the 100 years war and I know that battles in that time were brutal things. But the main character never seems to develope beyond reacting to has happened to him. His behavoir could be summed up "It seemed like a good idea at the time." For me it's a read once kinda book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this whilst on holiday in France, a perfect setting for a good read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"The hellequin...are the dead who have no souls. The dead who were so wicked in life that the devil loves them too much to punish them in hell and so he gives them his horses and releases them on the living."from Bernard Cornwell's "The Archer's Tale"This first novel in Bernard Cornwell's "Grail Series" is a rock n' roll 14th Century swords, horses and armor action adventure. The characters are interesting but cliched, flawed enough to develop an emotive reader response, but without real emotion and depth. The story is fast-paced, heavy on detailed scenes of 14th century battle, tactics, equipment and armor. And yes, there's some sex too.This novel sets the stage for a series focused on Thomas of Hookton, the bastard son of a priest who's grown up with a passion for archery, despite his father's best attempts at keeping him focused on intellectual pursuits. During a French raid to steal an awesome religious relic, the spear St. George used to slay the dragon, Thomas' passion is crystalized in a single pull of his bow, and the underlying premise of Cornwell's series is revealed: "In that one instant, as the first arrow slid into the sky, he knew he wanted nothing more from life. He was an archer."Later, Thomas leaves his home in England and joins an archery unit known as 'the hellequin', in support of his Kings' military pursuits across the channel. Cornwell describes Thomas' developing expertise in the skills of war, "It was not just that he was a good archer--the army was full of men who were as good as he and there was a handful who were better--but he had discovered he could sense what the enemy was doing." And so a plot full of blood, revenge, chivalry, humor and even love, begins.This is the third Cornwell book I've read. "The Archer's Tale" is exciting, interesting and diverting. It's not deep, but it's fun. It's not insightful, but the story flows well, and the pages turn themselves.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Bernard Cornwell has a gift -- not just of story-telling, but of conveying "realness" in his books. The Archer's Tale was no exception. Historical vibrancy, not just accuracy. The characters in this book become real individuals, the more you read. You befriend them, loathe them, root for them, mourn for them... At one point, when things looked particularly bleak for Thomas, I took a breath, and realized that if he died at this point in the book, Cornwell would have had to have cajones of steel to have called the book The Archer's Tale. I do have a word or two to say about Cornwell's treatment of one of my favorite characters in the book near the end (no spoiler here) and am debating about reading more in the series to see the outcome, which I don't think can be grand. Cornwell also has a knack of writing battle scenes that are probably the most accurate and descriptive ones I have read. You can understand the battle as it plays out across the field, or ford or town walls, whatever, and you can also feel the bloodlust awakened in the participants. I did have a lot of trouble with one spot, describing a head wound, that was just a little too close to home for my comfort. (As I was listening to this on audio, I just drove down Calhoun Street saying "lalalala I can't hear you" and cringing/waving my hands to wave the images away when the words got through. )This is the first book in the Grail Quest books, and I probably will read others in the series when I stumble upon them. As for Cornwell, he's on my favorite authors list. If you ever have a chance to go hear him speak, do so. Highly entertaining and informative (and lives part of the year here in Charleston.)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very cool, a lot of fighting, revenge, the usual Cornwell.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great read about the use of the long bow in british tactics. The French would cut the middle finger of English Archers captured in battle so that they could never pull the string again. Ergo, the middle finger salute to the French by the British archers.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Thomas Hookton watches as his village, family and friends are destroyed and vows revenge against the destroyer. He drifts into life as a bowman in the English Army, losing sight of his vow to avenge the death of his father. The story follows Thomas' experiences, and begins to unravel the mystery of his origins and his connection with the man he has sworn to kill. Cornwell has done a superb job of bringing the battle scenes to life on the page. HIs technical knowledge of the weaponry and techniques of the era is backed up by a flair for descriptive detail. He is less effective in bringing his characters to life and, in particular, in exploring what drives them. As an example, the Countess of Armorica "the blackbird" is a major character in the early part of the book. A substantial portion is told from her point of view. Ultimately, she just wanders off. Little effort is made to help the reader understand what motivates her. Thomas himself is an insipid character, evoking little sympathy or feeling from the reader. I'd recommend the book on the basis of descriptive detail and accurate portrayal of the era but it's unlikely I'll read the rest of the series.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book seems to be mostly about rape, and incidentally about an archer. I just could not get past the way in which women appeared in the book only to be assaulted and carried off. I eventually gave up trying to read it halfway through because i didn't care what happened, and didn't want to subject myself to more of the violence.There are plenty of books which manage to deal with the time period, and even raping and pillaging, in ways that don't turn my stomach. This was not one of them.quite disappointing, because some of his other books are good.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really enjoyed this first book of the Grail Quest series; the reason for less than a 5-star rating is only because so far I don't like this series as much as the Saxon series.In this novel, Thomas of Hookton serves as an archer for the English army under Edward III, at the beginning of the battles of the hundred years war. Very interesting to learn of the value of the archers within a battle. Thomas grows as a person, as he interacts with other characters of this novel. These other characters, enemies and friends, are also well-developed and add to the enjoyment of the novel.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was the first Bernard Cornwell novel I read and it hooked me. Solid plot with an interesting main character and it really captures the feel of the times.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Best line. "Now sir you are dressed to kill."
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Entertaining and informative historical fiction set during the Hundred Years War. As usual, Cornwell makes learning history an enjoyable experience and I recommend any of his books if you have an interest in the periods (usually medieval/napoleonic era but some others as well).
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A well-written, and as far as I can tell, historically accurate account of what it was like to be an archer in the English army around the time of the Battle of Crecy.Two things I always like about Cornwell are the fact that he does his research, and the fact that he is willing to have sympathetic characters on the enemy side.His greatest drawback in this book is that the female characters come over even sketchier than usual. I had very little feeling of Eleanor as a real person.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is my first book by Bernard Cornwell, who is a rather prolific historical fiction writer across various time periods.The Archer's Tale begins in the village of Hookton on the English coast. There, the lance of St. George was kept safely in the rafters of the church - until one day when Frenchmen raided the town and stole the lance. The only surviving villager is a young man, Thomas, the protagonist of the story. His journey leads him into France at the beginning of the Hundred Year's War. He is content as an archer for the king, but slowly, more clues emerge regarding the raid on his village and the history of the stolen artifact, and they seem to lead towards the ultimate of prizes: the holy grail itself.I love historical fiction, but I admit I had trouble getting into this book. Maybe it was the male perspective. Maybe it was the blatant portrayal of rape, including that of a minor character. The viewpoint shifts were annoying at times and seemed to give away too much of the plot. One of the major antagonists of the book dies without much fanfare at all, which seemed anticlimactic. Still, the historical details were intriguing, if sometimes excessive (there was about a two page spread on how early cannons worked, and then they blasted a few times and didn't do much, and that was that). Thomas matured in the course of the book, but I never felt that invested in his survival.I think I'll pick up some of Cornwell's other books on the medieval period, if I find them used and cheap, but I'm not going to run out and buy the rest of this particular series.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Thomas is protecting the Treasure of Hookton, a holy relic, on the eve of Easter when his English village is attacked by the French. The place is ransacked, men murdered, women raped and kidnapped, homes burned, and everything worth stealing, stolen, including the Treasure. In an attempt to save his home, Thomas takes up his bow against the invaders. A son of a priest, Thomas promises his dying father to bring the relic back. He also silently swears to avenge his death.He soon finds himself in the English army marching through France. Smart and very skilled with his bow, he rises fast among the archers. His conscience, in the form of a friend and fellow soldier named Father Hobbes, keeps reminding him of his promise to his father and his god, which Thomas would rather forget. Unfortunately for Thomas, his road to redemption is not easy. He runs afoul of a knight, and in an effort to help a lady, finds himself hanged. He survives and once again finds himself an archer only this time facing enemies he didn't know he had and a large French army wanting very much to kill him.This is my fifth Cornwell novel this year. I like his writing, enjoy the characters immensely, and like the action, which in some way is always attached to an army. While I liked this book, I didn't like it as much as the others I read. No reason really, just didn't get into it as much.Thomas is an engaging character but I felt bad for him the entire time. His family was killed, home wrecked, a friend constantly reminds of any bit of guilt he might feel, and he's not so lucky with the ladies. There is a good villain though, Sir Simon, who has it out for Thomas and a few other characters which make it interesting. There's a lot of information and characters in this book that will obviously feature heavily in the sequel so I'm looking forward to Vagabond to tie up a few loose ends.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read the newest book in this series, 1356, not knowing anything about it. After reading that, I just had to go back to the beginning of Thomas of Hookton's tale. The story is based around the events of the Hundred Years' War that pitted France and England in a long series of skirmishes. It tells the tale of a young man who yearns to get revenge on the soldier who raided his town, killed his father, and stole an ancient relic.The action is fast-paced; the recreation of the battle of Crécy is riveting, and Thomas is a well developed character. Being that this is the beginning of the Grail Quest series, Thomas does seem very confusing at times, but I think that makes him more likable, and the story more entertaining.If you like historical fiction this is a must read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very enjoyable. Hard to put down. Mr Cornwell is a very good writer of historical fiction. I can't wait to start on book two.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It's a very detailed story that almost verges on actual history. Starting with a horrific attack on the small village of Hookton, that leaves almost all the people dead and their holy relic stolen. One of the left behind is Thomas who takes out some of the raiders before they return to their ships and France.He takes the opportunity of the war with France for some vengeance and to find out more about his family and the mystery surrounding the holy relic. He picks up a lot of skill as an archer, a few women and some skills as a leader of men.I liked the story, I want to read more in this series to see how things pan out. Fun, but occasionally too much detail.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
fast paced, great characters and a really interesting plot, one of my favourites so far!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved this book. I've read the Sharpe's series by Cornwell, and the Hundredy Years War has always interested me, so gave this a try. We are introduced to Thomas of Hookton, the great mystery about his origins, and the quest he is set on. We also learn a bit about the longbow, and its use at the Battle of Crecy.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I didn't like this one as much as I liked the Warlord Chronicles, and I never really got to care for the characters, but it was an enjoyable, quick summer read. The historical details were interesting, and although the actual location of the grail and what it was like weren't surprising to me, it was an interesting idea.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An excellent beginning and my first foray into the stories of Bernard Cornwell. Wonderfully written and packed with action. I now require more. :)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Book 1 in the Grail Quest series. Set in the Hundred Years War, The Archer's Tale follows the exploits of Thomas, the son of a priest who witnessed the destruction of his village and killing of his parents by French raiders. Bent on vengeance and a desire to uncover secrets about his family that his father took to the grave, Thomas joins the English military and sets on a course that ends with the epic Battle of Crécy in 1346.In typical Cornwell style, The Archer's Tale includes a healthy dose of authentic history tweaked for story-telling purposes as need (and explained in the author's note at the end). The only thing that really seemed implausible was arranging for all of the protagonists to converge at the same spot and time on the battlefield. Still, it was a well-paced story and a great read for anyone interested in medieval life and warfare.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
From the author of the Richard Sharpe novels. Finally read it and found it a good read. At times it seems to be more about the number of battles & people killed. A lot of death & revenge stuff threaded through it. Please understand I wasn't expecting a moral story set in the 100 years war and I know that battles in that time were brutal things. But the main character never seems to develope beyond reacting to has happened to him. His behavoir could be summed up "It seemed like a good idea at the time." For me it's a read once kinda book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this whilst on holiday in France, a perfect setting for a good read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"The hellequin...are the dead who have no souls. The dead who were so wicked in life that the devil loves them too much to punish them in hell and so he gives them his horses and releases them on the living."from Bernard Cornwell's "The Archer's Tale"This first novel in Bernard Cornwell's "Grail Series" is a rock n' roll 14th Century swords, horses and armor action adventure. The characters are interesting but cliched, flawed enough to develop an emotive reader response, but without real emotion and depth. The story is fast-paced, heavy on detailed scenes of 14th century battle, tactics, equipment and armor. And yes, there's some sex too.This novel sets the stage for a series focused on Thomas of Hookton, the bastard son of a priest who's grown up with a passion for archery, despite his father's best attempts at keeping him focused on intellectual pursuits. During a French raid to steal an awesome religious relic, the spear St. George used to slay the dragon, Thomas' passion is crystalized in a single pull of his bow, and the underlying premise of Cornwell's series is revealed: "In that one instant, as the first arrow slid into the sky, he knew he wanted nothing more from life. He was an archer."Later, Thomas leaves his home in England and joins an archery unit known as 'the hellequin', in support of his Kings' military pursuits across the channel. Cornwell describes Thomas' developing expertise in the skills of war, "It was not just that he was a good archer--the army was full of men who were as good as he and there was a handful who were better--but he had discovered he could sense what the enemy was doing." And so a plot full of blood, revenge, chivalry, humor and even love, begins.This is the third Cornwell book I've read. "The Archer's Tale" is exciting, interesting and diverting. It's not deep, but it's fun. It's not insightful, but the story flows well, and the pages turn themselves.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Bernard Cornwell has a gift -- not just of story-telling, but of conveying "realness" in his books. The Archer's Tale was no exception. Historical vibrancy, not just accuracy. The characters in this book become real individuals, the more you read. You befriend them, loathe them, root for them, mourn for them... At one point, when things looked particularly bleak for Thomas, I took a breath, and realized that if he died at this point in the book, Cornwell would have had to have cajones of steel to have called the book The Archer's Tale. I do have a word or two to say about Cornwell's treatment of one of my favorite characters in the book near the end (no spoiler here) and am debating about reading more in the series to see the outcome, which I don't think can be grand. Cornwell also has a knack of writing battle scenes that are probably the most accurate and descriptive ones I have read. You can understand the battle as it plays out across the field, or ford or town walls, whatever, and you can also feel the bloodlust awakened in the participants. I did have a lot of trouble with one spot, describing a head wound, that was just a little too close to home for my comfort. (As I was listening to this on audio, I just drove down Calhoun Street saying "lalalala I can't hear you" and cringing/waving my hands to wave the images away when the words got through. )This is the first book in the Grail Quest books, and I probably will read others in the series when I stumble upon them. As for Cornwell, he's on my favorite authors list. If you ever have a chance to go hear him speak, do so. Highly entertaining and informative (and lives part of the year here in Charleston.)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very cool, a lot of fighting, revenge, the usual Cornwell.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great read about the use of the long bow in british tactics. The French would cut the middle finger of English Archers captured in battle so that they could never pull the string again. Ergo, the middle finger salute to the French by the British archers.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Thomas Hookton watches as his village, family and friends are destroyed and vows revenge against the destroyer. He drifts into life as a bowman in the English Army, losing sight of his vow to avenge the death of his father. The story follows Thomas' experiences, and begins to unravel the mystery of his origins and his connection with the man he has sworn to kill. Cornwell has done a superb job of bringing the battle scenes to life on the page. HIs technical knowledge of the weaponry and techniques of the era is backed up by a flair for descriptive detail. He is less effective in bringing his characters to life and, in particular, in exploring what drives them. As an example, the Countess of Armorica "the blackbird" is a major character in the early part of the book. A substantial portion is told from her point of view. Ultimately, she just wanders off. Little effort is made to help the reader understand what motivates her. Thomas himself is an insipid character, evoking little sympathy or feeling from the reader. I'd recommend the book on the basis of descriptive detail and accurate portrayal of the era but it's unlikely I'll read the rest of the series.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book seems to be mostly about rape, and incidentally about an archer. I just could not get past the way in which women appeared in the book only to be assaulted and carried off. I eventually gave up trying to read it halfway through because i didn't care what happened, and didn't want to subject myself to more of the violence.There are plenty of books which manage to deal with the time period, and even raping and pillaging, in ways that don't turn my stomach. This was not one of them.quite disappointing, because some of his other books are good.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really enjoyed this first book of the Grail Quest series; the reason for less than a 5-star rating is only because so far I don't like this series as much as the Saxon series.In this novel, Thomas of Hookton serves as an archer for the English army under Edward III, at the beginning of the battles of the hundred years war. Very interesting to learn of the value of the archers within a battle. Thomas grows as a person, as he interacts with other characters of this novel. These other characters, enemies and friends, are also well-developed and add to the enjoyment of the novel.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was the first Bernard Cornwell novel I read and it hooked me. Solid plot with an interesting main character and it really captures the feel of the times.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
d re lbi
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