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From the Publisher

Flight of the Maita #33. Tab and Kit go to a world where there may be interference or a local problem. A throwback may be causing the whole mess. This is a near-perfect society that must be saved.

Published: CD Moulton on
ISBN: 9781452325897
List price: $2.99
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