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From the Publisher

Nassim Nicholas Taleb popularized the term Black Swan through his books and interviews. Taleb’s Black Swan Theory refers only to unexpected events of large magnitude and consequence and their dominant role in history. This short story explores whether or not Black Swan events are really important to ordinary Main Street investors versus Wall Street traders.

Published: Dale Maley on
ISBN: 9781452372761
List price: $2.99
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