• book

From the Publisher

Got clay soil? Need advice on the best plants to grow? Award winning expert Graham Rice explains how to amend clay soil so your can enjoy a wider range of plants and recommends the best plants to grow. He provides descriptive selections of attractive trees, shrubs, vines, perennials, bulbs and annuals for your clay soil. The right plants can solve your clay soil problem. North American Edition.
Published: Graham Rice on
ISBN: 9781452453934
List price: $0.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Plants for Problem Places: Clay Soil [North American Edit...
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Fast Company
2 min read
Food & Wine

03 We’ll Get Back To The Land

Jennifer V. Cole When residents of the Cannery walk out of their front doors, they are surrounded by 7.5 acres of farmland that’s flush with tomatoes, melons, and other produce, as well as a healthy brood of free-range chickens. In the distance, there’s a barn and a stand where passersby can purchase fresh baskets of crops. It sounds like life in the country, but the Cannery is located just two miles outside of the city of Davis, California. The community is one of a growing number of “agrihoods”: urban and suburban housing developments that are constructed around working farms. “I’m a homebu
Popular Science
4 min read

12 Gardening Buys for the Horticulturally Hopeless

Pixabay Wouldn't it be nice? A lot of things can go wrong in the garden. Some seeds just won’t sprout. A plant’s leaves droop and turn colors they shouldn’t. Thankfully, inventive people are starting to tackle this problem, manipulating hot tech to help you keep things...less dead. Don't fret about the color of your thumb; this stuff will bring you a few steps closer to becoming the 21st century's Frederick Law Olmsted (or whatever landscape architect inspires you). Amazon A helpful gardening book Start off small. Teeny Tiny Gardening by Emma Hardy features 35 small-scale gardening projects to
Futurity
4 min read

Paying Farmers Not To Farm Saved Sage Grouse

A Reagan-era federal government program that subsidizes farmers to plant year-round grasses and native shrubs instead of crops has had a surprisingly large and beneficial effect on the Eastern Washington sage grouse population, a new study shows. Although the program was adopted for many different reasons, the study finds it is probably the reason that sage grouse still live in portions of Washington’s Columbia Basin. “Without these lands, our models predict that we would lose about two thirds of the species’ habitat, and that the sage grouse would go extinct in two of three subpopulations,” s