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From the Publisher

One in the series of Human-Animal Studies ebooks produced as a result of the (printed) publication of the definitive HAS handbook, Teaching the Animal: Human–Animal Studies across the Disciplines. This chapter focuses on cultural studies, includes two course syllabi, and has a full resources section covering all disciplines. Includes chapter "Animal Geographies" by Jody Emel and Julie Urbanik.

Published: Lantern Books on
ISBN: 9781590562222
List price: $2.99
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