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"A thrilling glimpse into the near future. Don't miss it!"—Tony Hillerman, author of the Joe Leaphorn mysteries###Review by Midwest Book Review (Oregon, WI USA))Computer industry consultant and award-winning author Gerald M. Weinberg presents The Aremac Project, a thrilling science fiction novel. A fast-paced read brimming with raw excitement.###Review by R. DrabickAs an avid Sci-Fi reader, I found this book fascinating. While it's not in my favorite genre, it's an interesting tale of genius inventors, criminal investigation, and unusual terrorists. While the book is cerebral in parts, it has a bang-up ending with a surprising "lead villain". The heros are somehow an interesting synthesis of logical scientists and lovable individuals, especially Tess and Addie.Read this book.###Review by Dwayne PhillipsThe source of my joy reading "The Aremac Project" was finding the gems of technical advice woven into the story of terrorists and hero technologists (yes, a book where the geeks are the good guys). I recommend "The Aremac Project" for anyone wishing entertainment and consultation with one of the technical world's leading consultants.###Review by dlgIf you like science fiction, mysteries or thrillers, I highly recommend this book. I couldn't put it down. The plot has many unexpected twists—a catastrophic misfortune, a new technology, a fight to get or maintain control over the new technology, and terrorism, to name a few. The main characters are sympathetic and believable techies. The other characters range from an ambivalent hero to a smarmy professor to seemingly evil terrorists. The technology is futuristic and believable and the short chapters keep it moving at a rapid pace. A great read!###"The Aremac Project combines the best of thrillers and science fiction in slam-bang near future action-adventure. Technology, love and the underpinnings of our society intersect in Weinberg's fast-paced story. Now I just wish he'd go ahead and invent the real thing." - Jay Lake, author of Mainspring from Tor Books###"Gerald Weinberg's The Aremac Project is a page-turning science fiction/technological thriller that successfully combines wish-I-had-that futuristic technology with today's political and security climate. Smart characters, ingenious science, and plenty of twists and turns--this is a book you won't be ready to put down until the last clever move is played out." - Robin Brande www.robinbrande.com###"I enjoyed The Aremac Project. It was original and compelling with vivid details and memorable characters -- characters I cared about. It was one of those books that kept me turning the pages late at night when I should be sleeping." - Adrian Nikolas Phoenix, author of A Rush of Wings###Review by Peter Heck, Asimov’s Science Fiction, March, 2008This one's a bit of a sleeper, a near-future thriller built around neuro-science and nanotech by one of the giants of the IT revolution. Weinberg throws a couple of curves right off the bat: first of all, Roger's family are thoroughly unlikely potential terrorists. Except for his cousin Azara, who has demonstrated for religious freedom for Muslims, they are more interested in running their businesses and leading a happy family life. Second, Tess is by a lot of measures even smarter than Roger—although she lags slightly behind his genius-level engineering abilities, she is far more attuned to the way the everyday world works.I'd describe Weinberg as more an "idea man" than a smooth stylist -- but he has plenty of ideas, and a ways of making them convincing. He has a likable pair of protagonists, a supporting cast that manages to avoid stereotyping, and he contrives to keep a few plot surprises up his sleeve for the final showdown. Probably the closest comparisons among established SF writers would be Robert Forward and James P. Hogan. If that's your kind of reading fare, I suggest you give Weinberg a try.
Published: Gerald M. Weinberg on
ISBN: 9781452376394
List price: $6.99
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Not many books take an invention from the start to the working-prototype finish. This is one such book.A new invention, the intimate affects on the lives of the inventors, the conspiring political scene, both in the US and the world, and more. I enjoyed the ride, with it all coming together in a great action sequence. I thought the story had a nice balance between the science and the effects on the lives of the main characters. It didn't delve into dry scientific terms and explanations, but instead kept my interest to keep reading to learn more. I also liked the changing relationship between the two main characters, in a development in their affection to each other from something more clinical to something more emotional-based.This was the first book of a series, and I'm looking forward to reading the others.more
I enjoyed reading Jerry Weinberg's foray into fiction writing. I have had the pleasure of knowing Jerry for about ten years and his non-fiction writing for twenty years. As he reveals in his blog on writing (weinbergonwriting.blogspot.com), Jerry has returned to fiction writing as a way to spread some of his lessons learned from 50 years working in computers and other technical areas.That was the source of my joy reading "The Aremac Project" - finding the gems of technical advice woven into the story of terrorists and hero technologists (yes, a book where the geeks are the good guys).Among the good advice to use is:People trap themselves in inefficient patterns and aren't likely to change unless something drastic happens to them.It's is because software is easier to change that it requires more discipline.The lack of clues is a clue.Telling them to go faster only leads to making mistakes.Notice the world around you.Among the bad advice frequently given and we should all avoid is:What could possibly go wrong?We don't have time to make a plan.Thinking is a luxury we can no longer afford.I especially appreciated the lesson on intellectual property rights. Weinberg knows this topic after having published 40-something books and hundreds of papers. His advice serves authors and others (like computer programmers) well, and for us this is worth the price of the novel.I recommend "The Aremac Project" for anyone wishing entertainment and consultation with one of the technical world's leading consultants.more
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Reviews

Not many books take an invention from the start to the working-prototype finish. This is one such book.A new invention, the intimate affects on the lives of the inventors, the conspiring political scene, both in the US and the world, and more. I enjoyed the ride, with it all coming together in a great action sequence. I thought the story had a nice balance between the science and the effects on the lives of the main characters. It didn't delve into dry scientific terms and explanations, but instead kept my interest to keep reading to learn more. I also liked the changing relationship between the two main characters, in a development in their affection to each other from something more clinical to something more emotional-based.This was the first book of a series, and I'm looking forward to reading the others.more
I enjoyed reading Jerry Weinberg's foray into fiction writing. I have had the pleasure of knowing Jerry for about ten years and his non-fiction writing for twenty years. As he reveals in his blog on writing (weinbergonwriting.blogspot.com), Jerry has returned to fiction writing as a way to spread some of his lessons learned from 50 years working in computers and other technical areas.That was the source of my joy reading "The Aremac Project" - finding the gems of technical advice woven into the story of terrorists and hero technologists (yes, a book where the geeks are the good guys).Among the good advice to use is:People trap themselves in inefficient patterns and aren't likely to change unless something drastic happens to them.It's is because software is easier to change that it requires more discipline.The lack of clues is a clue.Telling them to go faster only leads to making mistakes.Notice the world around you.Among the bad advice frequently given and we should all avoid is:What could possibly go wrong?We don't have time to make a plan.Thinking is a luxury we can no longer afford.I especially appreciated the lesson on intellectual property rights. Weinberg knows this topic after having published 40-something books and hundreds of papers. His advice serves authors and others (like computer programmers) well, and for us this is worth the price of the novel.I recommend "The Aremac Project" for anyone wishing entertainment and consultation with one of the technical world's leading consultants.more
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