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From the Publisher

Silver is bite-sized fun – sort of like your favorite cereal for a long breakfast. It will also only take that long consume the whole book. Each poem goes after just one main thought. Some are very direct, some a bit cleverer, but all easy to “get it.” Twenty-five nuggets of silver for your pleasure.

Published: Rod Walters on
ISBN: 9780970044181
List price: $0.99
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