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From the Publisher

In just their third year of existence as an NHL expansion team, not much was expected of the 1972-73 Buffalo Sabres. But these upstarts, led by future Hall of Famer Gilbert Perreault, qualified for the playoffs and gave the fans of Buffalo a season they will never forget. When it was over, a sellout crowd at the Aud chanted “Thank You Sabres” and a love affair between town and team was born.

Published: Sal Maiorana on
ISBN: 9781452366395
List price: $6.99
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