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From the Publisher

Versions of “Computer-supported collaborative learning: An historical perspective” by Gerry Stahl, Timothy Koschmann and Daniel D. Suthers for a global audience: in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Romanian and German. An introduction to the educational research field of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning from an interactional perspective.

Published: Gerry Stahl on
ISBN: 9781458147790
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