Indian Massacre in Orlando by Walter Parks - Read Online
Indian Massacre in Orlando
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Summary

Arguably the last Indians living in Central Florida in 1883 were all massacred because the chief's favorite squaw loved White Man Cow.

John asked the President of the United States to send soldiers to remove the Indians. John didn't think his request was out of line; after all the government had earlier been moving Indians to the "Indians Territory" (now Oklahoma) for years.

But the President wouldn't do it.

So John had to do it.

He killed every man, woman and child.

This is the story of why he did it.

This is the story of how he did it.

This is the story of the unbelievable consequences.

I believe that Indian Massacre in Orlando is basically a true story. I used old documents and interviews of John's decedents about stories passed down in the family. I also used other historical documents and research from the Internet.

I had to fill in some gaps for some of the minor details which were not available from the interviews or historical data. I wanted to minimize such usages and therefore I have purposefully kept the story short and confined to the true data.

To help you grasp and understand the cause of the massacre I have included a brief history of the relationships between the Indians and the pioneers.

And I have included a description of the paradise in which the local Indians lived before we came. This paradise, while not in its "wild" form, still exists and I have lived in it for most of my adult life.

I believe you will enjoy the story.

Published: Walter Parks on
ISBN: 9781465950154
List price: $2.99
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Indian Massacre in Orlando - Walter Parks

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Page 1 of 1

Preface

John Mohr had received a land grant from President Arthur in 1883. The property was on the Orlando Windermere Butler Chain of Lakes. Long after his death I bought the land from his family.

They gave me the deed from the President.

I interviewed the family members and they told me stories about John Mohr and key family members. I was especially interested in his encounters with the local Indians.

In this book I have tried to be as faithful as possible to the stories I was told. I also relied on historical evidence from various sources including the Internet.

I believe that Indian Massacre in Orlando is basically a true story. I did have to fill in some gaps for some of the minor details which were not available from the interviews or historical data. I wanted to minimize such needs and therefore I have purposefully kept the story short and confined to the true data.

To help you grasp and understand the cause of the massacre I have included a brief history of the relationships between the Indians and the pioneers.

And I have included a description of the paradise in which the local Indians lived before we came. This paradise, while not in its wild form, still exists and I have lived in it for most of my adult life.

I hope you enjoy.

Walter Parks

Chapter 1

White Man Cows

A light fog hangs over the barnyard at the Mohr farm. There is not a whisper of wind near the ground.

Sparse clouds drift in the soft upper winds causing the light from the quarter moon to cast alternating patterns of light and dark on the ground. Sounds of insects chirping can be heard from all directions.

Everything seems at peace even though the fog and changing light patterns makes for an eerie night.

The cows are half asleep, lying on their legs and lazily chewing their cuds in the still night.

An owl hoots. Another owl returns the hoot.

A low whinny from a horse still awake sounds a concern. Something is moving towards the barnyard.

A shadow separates from the brush and moves towards one of the cows. The cow stops it’s chewing and looks towards the movement. Suddenly the shadow rushes towards the cow. The cow struggles to get up!

The shadow can now be seen as an Indian running towards the cow with a pole ax held above his head. The ax comes down hard on the struggling cow’s head.

The cow slumps back to the ground.

The rest of the cows do not seem too concerned, but they do rise to their feet and stare at their herd member lying on the ground.

The cow's legs twitch.

The Indian looks around.

There is nothing for concern; just other livestock staring at him.

He motions to his companions. Three other Indians hurry from the brush to the fallen cow. The four grab the cow by its legs and quickly drag it to their 2 canoes waiting at the edge of the lake.

The other cows continue to stare