• book

From the Publisher

What are superstitions and why are people superstitious? How did superstitions originate and how can they be explained? In this book you will find the answers along with more information about Wedding customs and superstitions, birth and death customs and superstitions. Find out how the sea, sport, the Moon, numbers, crystals and Christmas are linked with superstitions. Is there any area of life that has not been touched at some time by superstition? Are you superstitious? You could be surprised!

Contents:
One – Why are people superstitious and different types of superstitions
Two – Superstitions and how it all began – Are people still superstitious?
Three – Wedding customs and love superstitions
Four – Birth and death customs and superstitions
Five – Superstitions, the Moon and farming
Six – Medieval England and superstitions
Seven – Superstitions and numbers
Eight – Superstitions and crystals
Nine – Sea travel and superstitions
Ten – Superstitions and sport
Eleven – Christmas customs and superstitions
Twelve – Indian culture and superstitions
Thirteen (unlucky for some!) – Superstitions that are lined to the body
Fourteen – Bees and omens and superstitions or bees and Old Wives Tales!

Published: Carole Somerville on
ISBN: 9781465851024
List price: $1.25
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Superstitions: Origins, Explanations and Examples
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
8 min read

Explaining the Unexplainable: When logic fails, stories and superstitions prevail.

During the Enlightenment, the French philosopher Voltaire called superstition a “mad daughter” and likened it to astrology. The leading thinkers of the time espoused reason and sought to explain the world through the scientific method. Today, we take a certain pride in approaching the world analytically. When faced with a confusing event, we search for its cause and effect. If we can determine why one action follows another, we can explain why it happened and when it might recur in the future. This makes the outcome reliable. The fact is that any of us can become superstitious given the right
Nautilus
13 min read

Why We Keep Playing the Lottery: Blind to the mathematical odds, we fall to the marketing gods.

To grasp how unlikely it was for Gloria C. MacKenzie, an 84-year-old Florida widow, to have won the $590 million Powerball lottery in May, Robert Williams, a professor of health sciences at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, offers this scenario: head down to your local convenience store, slap $2 on the counter, and fill out a six-numbered Powerball ticket. It will take you about 10 seconds. To get your chance of winning down to a coin toss, or 50 percent, you will need to spend 12 hours a day, every day, filling out tickets for the next 55 years. It’s going be expensive. You will have t
Nautilus
13 min read

Why We Keep Playing the Lottery: Blind to the mathematical odds, we fall to the marketing gods.

To grasp how unlikely it was for Gloria C. MacKenzie, an 84-year-old Florida widow, to have won the $590 million Powerball lottery in May, Robert Williams, a professor of health sciences at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, offers this scenario: head down to your local convenience store, slap $2 on the counter, and fill out a six-numbered Powerball ticket. It will take you about 10 seconds. To get your chance of winning down to a coin toss, or 50 percent, you will need to spend 12 hours a day, every day, filling out tickets for the next 55 years. It’s going be expensive. You will have t