Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Steward is a Beta— a clone. In his memories, he’s an elite commando for an orbital policorp— but because his Alpha never did a brain-scan update, Steward’s memories are fifteen years out of date . . . and in those fifteen years, everything has changed.

An interstellar war destroyed the company that held his allegiance. His wife has divorced him, along with the second wife that he can’t even remember. Most of his comrades died in a useless battle on a world called Sheol, and those who survived are irrevocably scarred. An alien race has arrived and become the center of a complex and deadly intrigue.

And someone has murdered him.

“Fast-moving, hard-driving, with a robust well-handled plot . . . a stirring and heartening performance.” – Kirkus Reviews

“Walter Jon Williams proves that he is a master of action, character and galaxy-spanning plots.” — Fantasy Review

“A combination of fast action, gritty realism, and high-tech polytechnics that is certain to be popular with Williams’ growing audience.” –Booklist.

“(Williams) is a master of the intricate yet fast-paced plot— the essence of thrillers and novels of political intrigue.” –Locus

Published: Walter Jon Williams on
ISBN: 9780983740865
List price: $4.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Voice of the Whirlwind (Hardwired)
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
While written in the cyberpunk era, the book is actually closer in spirit to the classic Raymond Chandler detective story than to most science fiction. So you can read it enjoyably as a detective novel, with some science fiction gimmicks added on to move the story (notably, insurance that allows you to be revived in a new body should you die by misfortune).

At a deeper level, the novel also explores philosophical themes: What is it that gives a person identity? How is human virtue to be defined? In the face of chaos, how does one tell right from wrong? Williams is very skillful in exploring the philosophical themes without allowing them to crush the forward movement of the plot.

The book does require a certain amount of patience. The plot doesn't get seriously underway for six or seven chapters, so it may be necessary to slog through the first 40 to 50 pages. Once the action starts, though, the book carries you along until it builds to the final climax.more
The setup is thought-provoking: is your clone a person distinct from yourself, even though he has all your recorded memories? Is he responsible for your actions as well as his own? How can your clone have free will given that will and consciousness are all technically in memory anyway? Well, I guess they're new memories. How much genetic shift arises going from clone to clone, and how?How can anybody have the bravery to write futuristic fiction? Look at this author: for a 1987 book he fixed on genetic engineering and faster-than-light travel, but had no clue that there would be wireless communications or hand-helds! Intentional mutants with 4 or 6 legs still have to run to a phone booth to make a call! I wouldn't have the nerve for guesses so public.The writing, by which I mean the sound of the narrator's prose, is terse and intense. It's exactly the way a man is when he's concentrating on some job he wants to do. So Williams got that right.I liked all the Zen stuff. It's apt for a clone who wakes up with nothing and has to build up from there, which is what this highly memorable and sympathetic hero does.more

Reviews

While written in the cyberpunk era, the book is actually closer in spirit to the classic Raymond Chandler detective story than to most science fiction. So you can read it enjoyably as a detective novel, with some science fiction gimmicks added on to move the story (notably, insurance that allows you to be revived in a new body should you die by misfortune).

At a deeper level, the novel also explores philosophical themes: What is it that gives a person identity? How is human virtue to be defined? In the face of chaos, how does one tell right from wrong? Williams is very skillful in exploring the philosophical themes without allowing them to crush the forward movement of the plot.

The book does require a certain amount of patience. The plot doesn't get seriously underway for six or seven chapters, so it may be necessary to slog through the first 40 to 50 pages. Once the action starts, though, the book carries you along until it builds to the final climax.more
The setup is thought-provoking: is your clone a person distinct from yourself, even though he has all your recorded memories? Is he responsible for your actions as well as his own? How can your clone have free will given that will and consciousness are all technically in memory anyway? Well, I guess they're new memories. How much genetic shift arises going from clone to clone, and how?How can anybody have the bravery to write futuristic fiction? Look at this author: for a 1987 book he fixed on genetic engineering and faster-than-light travel, but had no clue that there would be wireless communications or hand-helds! Intentional mutants with 4 or 6 legs still have to run to a phone booth to make a call! I wouldn't have the nerve for guesses so public.The writing, by which I mean the sound of the narrator's prose, is terse and intense. It's exactly the way a man is when he's concentrating on some job he wants to do. So Williams got that right.I liked all the Zen stuff. It's apt for a clone who wakes up with nothing and has to build up from there, which is what this highly memorable and sympathetic hero does.more
scribd