Crab Boy's Ghost, Gullah Folktales from Murrells Inlet's Brookgreen Gardens in the South Carolina Lowcountry by Lynn Michelsohn - Read Online
Crab Boy's Ghost, Gullah Folktales from Murrells Inlet's Brookgreen Gardens in the South Carolina Lowcountry
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Summary

Beware the Shrieking Droll!

Meet the restless spirit of a young boy lost forever to a fierce marsh creature. Now he haunts the maze of Murrells Inlet marshes as a "droll," the unhappy ghost of a child who has died an unnatural death.

Then enjoy the antics of friendlier animal inhabitants of nearby Waccamaw swamp: Brother Frog, Brother Rabbit, and Brother Gator, each trying to outwit the other.

This selection of four charming African American Gullah folktales (5,000 words, five illustrations, 56 pages in paperback) comes from Lynn Michelsohn's longer collection, "Tales from Brookgreen," stories of ghosts and lovers, historical characters and mysterious visitors in the historic rice plantations of the South Carolina Lowcountry near Myrtle Beach. The story of Crab Boy also appears in "Gullah Ghosts."

Published: Lynn Michelsohn on
ISBN: 9781465966308
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Crab Boy’s Ghost

Gullah Folktales

from Murrells Inlet’s

Brookgreen Gardens in the

South Carolina Lowcountry

by

Lynn Michelsohn

Published by Cleanan Press, Inc.

Roswell, New Mexico USA

Copyright © 2004 Lynn Michelsohn

Table of Contents

Title Page

Preface

Introduction: The Gullah Language

Chapter 1. Crab Boy’s Ghost

Chapter 2. Brother Gator and His Friends

Chapter 3. A Fine Hunting Dog

Chapter 4. One Scrawny Tail

About the Storytellers

About the Author

Acknowledgements

Extended Copyright

BONUS FEATURES

A Selection from Lowcountry Ghosts

A Selection from Gullah Ghosts

Other Books by Lynn Michelsohn

Preface

Miss Genevieve and Cousin Corrie, two charming Hostesses at Brookgreen Gardens near Myrtle Beach in the South Carolina Lowcountry, told these Gullah folktales during the middle years of the Twentieth Century. One, a ghost story, and the others, animal tales, reflect the rich Gullah culture that once flourished among the African-American inhabitants along the South Carolina coast. All come from my longer collection, Tales from Brookgreen: Folklore, Ghost Stories, and Gullah Folktales from the South Carolina Lowcountry.

I hope you enjoy them.

Lynn Michelsohn

Brookgreen Gardens,

between Myrtle Beach and Charleston

on the South Carolina coast.

Introduction: The Gullah Language

Miss Genevieve explained the development of the Gullah language spoken by descendents of slaves in the South Carolina Lowcountry like this . . .

Nobody can tell you for sure how the Gullah language developed but people who have studied it do have some idea about its history and this is how they explain it.

Slaves brought to South Carolina came from different parts of West Africa. Each African area and tribal group had its own language and customs. When slaves arrived on Lowcountry plantations, communication presented a big challenge. Slaves and planters spoke different languages and often fellow slaves even spoke different languages yet all had to understand each other well enough to live and work together.

A pidgin language developed that contained words and grammatical structures from English and from various African languages. Planters and overseers kept speaking English and slaves kept speaking their own various languages but each also learned to speak the pidgin language, called Gullah, to communicate with each other.

People who study languages tell me that at this stage Gullah was a pidgin language because no one spoke it as his native language but those speaking different languages used it to communicate with each other. Some people think the name Gullah came from the word Angola, which was the homeland of many of the slaves.

As new generations of slaves were born in the Lowcountry, these children grew up speaking Gullah