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From the Publisher

This is the first book that takes a hard look into the dark, dangerous world of remote viewing.
Remote viewing was developed during the Cold War to gather intelligence on our enemies but today offers new ways of healing and spiritual awareness. Frost’s book features remote viewing superstars Ed Dames, Ingo Swann, Lyn Buchanan, Stephan Schwartz, Joe McMoneagle, Skip Atwater and Mel Riley.

Published: NewsHooks 2 NewsBooks on
ISBN: 9781465755117
List price: $9.99
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