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From the Publisher

A collection of eighteen short stories suitable for all ages and written in several different styles. As the title suggests, there are explorations and examinations in many different directions that lead to insight, grounding, adventure and growth. A splendid time is guaranteed for all.

Published: Robert Adair Wilson on
ISBN: 9781466107748
List price: $3.99
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Availability for Ceilings, Doors, Windows, Floors: Collected Stories 2011
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