• book

From the Publisher

Suppose you were starving and you sat down to enjoy a well-planned, nourishing meal. But, just as you begin to eat, someone rushes by and snatches your food away and tells you that you cannot have any more. What would you think of this food-snatcher?

This is exactly what you do to yourself when you take shallow breaths of air as most people do. Often, we use only one-fourth to one-half of our lung capacity with each breath. This starves our bodies much like we are depriving it of food. We are slowly robbing our bodies on its most vital, invisible nourishment -- oxygen.

Written by the father and daughter team of Drs. Patricia and Paul C. Bragg, this book shows how to breathe in a way that replentishes the body with oxygen and other critical components.

"The more effectively we breathe the more effectively we live," wrote the authors. "Super Power Breathing can make your life-force stronger, calmer and smarter."

Some of the benefits of Super Power Breathing include: increased oxygen intake; stress relief; emotional balance; overall relaxation combined with increased mental sharpness, creativity and oxygenation of the blood, tissues, muscles and organs.

This book takes you through all the benefits of proper breathing, shows you how to do it, and can change your life simply by showing you how to do something as simple as -- breathing!

Published: Patricia Bragg and Paul Bragg on
List price: $0.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Super Power Breathing for Super Health
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

TIME
3 min read
Self-Improvement

Simple Moves Can Lead to a Less Stressed-out You

STRESS IS A MODERN MENTAL BOGEYMAN that keeps half of U.S. adults up at night, according to a recent survey from the American Psychological Association. And many people don’t do anything to try to fight it. That’s bad news because stress takes a measurable physical toll on the body: it’s linked to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, plus a general sense of malaise. But there’s fresh evidence that simple mindfulness practices—and no, that doesn’t have to mean sitting cross-legged in meditation—can help ease anxiety. In a new study to be published in the journal Psychiatry Research, peop
Popular Science
2 min read

How Some Animals Survive On Almost No Water

In the most arid places on the planet, hydration is hard to come by and easy to lose. Every moist breath exhaled, every bead of sweat that drips off, and every emptied bladderful of urine means wasted wetness and a greater risk of death by dehydration. Yet some animals manage to survive in these places. They get by on almost no water at all, thanks to clever adaptations that make them super savers and hydration scavengers. Michael Brandon Myers Tortoise In the Mojave and Sonoran deserts, several tortoise species survive off their urine. During times of plenty, their bladders swell to hold arou
NPR
4 min read
Self-Improvement

A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind

Take a deep breath in through your nose, and slowly let it out through your mouth. Do you feel calmer? Controlled breathing like this can combat anxiety, panic attacks and depression. It's one reason so many people experience tranquility after meditation or a pranayama yoga class. How exactly the brain associates slow breathing with calmness and quick breathing with nervousness, though, has been a mystery. Now, researchers say they've found the link, at least in mice. The key is a smattering of about 175 neurons in a part of the brain the researchers call the breathing pacemaker, which is a cl