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From the Publisher

Lycans and vampires do not mate.

When Eve, a beautiful vampire, journeys to King Drago’s castle, she doesn’t expect the contempt and dislike the king shows her. He wants her off his royal grounds because he doesn’t want to place his people in harm’s way with her vile thirst. Vampires are evil, he says, ruled by the devil, feeding off innocents to survive. Eve doesn’t care what he thinks. She has arrived at his castle for one reason. She wants her daughter.

Drago, a two-hundred-year-old Lycan King, cannot explain the lust heating his loins for this undead beauty. She has the face of an angel, yet she splays her sword like a warrior and fights like his best royal guard. In time, it is more than her beauty and fighting skills that interests him. It is her courage and bravery, her compassion and honour that makes him realise he may have done her a great injustice calling her evil. He soon discovers he is lusting after her like no other because she is his one, his soul mate. How can that be? He knows of no Lycan in existence who has ever claimed a vampire.

Published: eXtasy Books Inc on
ISBN: 9781771111119
List price: $4.99
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