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ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND/
LE AVVENTURE DI ALICE NEL PAESE DELLE MERAVIGLIE:

This unique book features paragraph by paragraph translations from English to Italian, allowing the reader to learn Italian vocabulary and sentence structure while enjoying a classic.

This is a fun and affordable way to learn a second language. Previous experience with Italian is recommended, but ambitious beginners are welcome to give it a try. If you have no experience with Italian, it may be helpful to look up Italian pronunciation before starting this book.

QUICK SYNOPSIS:
"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" is the famous story of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world. There she experiences many mishaps and adventures and meets many strange creatures.

Published: Kryptic Books on
ISBN: 9781476193861
List price: $2.99
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Wonderful, nonsensical romp through a fantasy world. The characters are quirky and appealing, Alice is curious but goes along with things quite nicely. Be warned: if you are looking for a book that makes sense and is easy to follow, this is not for you! It's easy to see why this has tale captivated readers young and old for over 100 years.more
Wonderful, nonsensical romp through a fantasy world. The characters are quirky and appealing, Alice is curious but goes along with things quite nicely. Be warned: if you are looking for a book that makes sense and is easy to follow, this is not for you! It's easy to see why this has tale captivated readers young and old for over 100 years.more
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the Classic nonsense tale of an English girl falling down a rabbit hole, there to encounter the strange world of absurdly anthropomorphized animals and playing cards, enigmatic messages and, well, sizing issues :-D

A Classic is usually a novel that has become so ingrained in the collective memory or culture, that one might not be sure whether one has read it or not. The reputation of the book itself precedes the actual experience of reading it and the characters are often the prototypes of later iterations and any number of adaptations. If you've never experienced Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, or read it once before, or even if you've read it multiple times, it bears (another) reading. As familiar as many are with the tale, to actually read or hear the original, un-Disneyfied tale is a pleasure as the nuances of the language surface and fade in ephemeral logic and gently wry humor. The subtlety, whimsy and detail of Wonderland, its inhabitants and their language lends itself to repeated discoveries.

Michael York as the narrator of this audiobook edition brings a nice range of character voices to the story, never sounded absurd himself as he renders the tale of Alice with obvious affection and a master storyteller's grace. His smooth, somewhat effete British voice evokes the romance of an afternoon spent on the Thames and brings the curiouser and curiouser world of Carroll's creation to life.

Redacted from the original blog review at dog eared copy, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; 07/12/2011more
This is not as good as I expected. Lots of folks said it's really great... but I'm finding it rushed, and not compelling...more
The edition I read was actually an online version with the same illustrations and everything. It is a rather fun book, and is certainly far deeper than the "children's book" that it is depicted to be on its surface. I wouldn't say I loved it, but it was certainly worth finally reading the book behind a story I have heard so much about. The language twists alone made it well worth it, as there is definitely a lot of creativity there.more
The edition I read was actually an online version with the same illustrations and everything. It is a rather fun book, and is certainly far deeper than the "children's book" that it is depicted to be on its surface. I wouldn't say I loved it, but it was certainly worth finally reading the book behind a story I have heard so much about. The language twists alone made it well worth it, as there is definitely a lot of creativity there.more
As a child, I read the stories of Alice in Wonderland (and, later, Through the Looking Glass) with a sense of wonder and amusement. Alice shows that it is possible to engage with a world which makes no sense on her own terms; she is not overwrought at her lack of understanding of the improbable and bizarre happenings around her. She brings reason to bear in narrow, specific cases (such as when arguing with the Red Queen), but is not paralysed by the irrationality of general occurrence. In this, she is like all children - dealing with reality not by knowing, but by exploring and engaging. This sense of innocent inquiry creates great sympathy in the younger reader.As an adult (older, grizzled and perhaps wiser), re-reading these stories once again provokes wonder and amusement - but this time, the wonder is at the ingenuity of the author and the amusement is if anything greater. This shift in reaction is because, as an adult, I know a few things: I know that it is impossible (in general life!) for soldiers to be playing cards, for Cheshire cats to disappear from the tail and for children to shrink and grow at the slightest provocation. Knowing this increases my admiration for Lewis Carroll, as he has constructed a world where the impossible occurs, but not without its own logic.While there is nonsense, there is structure - and the impossibilities have the common feature that they are all things which might occur to an imaginative young child while daydreaming. Thus they are not simply random (which would be nowhere near so satisfying to read), they are linked and interlocked to form a thoroughly pleasing structure. The underlying structure of the poem Jabberwocky has been analysed at length in [Hoftstadter], which elicits further wonder at the interlinked meanings and senses in the work. The amusement, of course, comes from understanding more of the jokes!more
Ugh. Alice is ridiculously annoying. I did not enjoy the plot of this, the poetry, the constant repetition of ideas (the shrinking and growing). None of the characters were in any way interesting. I don't understand the universal love of this book.more
Timeless, relatable story for many young readers. Fosters and an amazing sense of imagination. Student learn that whenever they face an obstacle they can overcome it. One theme in this book is life being a puzzle. This story is similar to how a child might think. I think it would be a very good book to use in the classroom.more
Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland is a classic that everyone should read. His play with words, his insane universe with amazing characters, and his symbolism make this a work that can be read over and over. Each time I read it I discover new things, and look at it in a different way. Truly an amazing work by an amazing man.more
Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland is a classic that everyone should read. His play with words, his insane universe with amazing characters, and his symbolism make this a work that can be read over and over. Each time I read it I discover new things, and look at it in a different way. Truly an amazing work by an amazing man.more
First line:~ Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictiures or conversation, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?~I found this book intriguing and boring at the same time. I think that I have been contaminated by the movies and television shows so the book seemed too 'plain'. Not enough colour. It is one of the few times that I can say that I enjoyed the movie more than the book; usually it is the other way around.I did find that the change of topics from chapter to chapter was inconsistent but when you see that the whole thing is a dream, well, that is how dreams work isn't it? Not much connection between one thing and another, jumping from scene to scene. If I was going to read this to my children I would choose some kind of a Disney version because I think that the graphics, in this case, add a valuable dimension to the reading experience.I am glad that I read it but it will never be a re-read, unless I have a grand-child!more
A classic. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the first installment of this classic story. It’s one of those movies that has been depicted in film for years, and will be interesting for children to read. This curious tale of Alice encourages children to glimpse a new world full of fun and exciting things. Things most would never even think of. It begins when Alice sees a White Rabbit running across the bank wearing a vest and holding a pocket watch. She decides to go on an adventure and follow this rabbit down his hole where she falls for what seems like ages. After growing and shrinking several times, she gets through a small door which leads to a whole different world. This world includes talking animals and cards. On this adventure through Wonderland, Alice comes across many strange circumstances and in trying to be polite gets caught in some people's company that is less than desirable (like the caterpillar, the Duchess, the Pig, the Mock Turtle, and the Red Queen). Alice enjoys exploring the world she entered through the White Rabbit’s hole that is so different from her own. But Alice finds these creature lack manners and sometimes run confusing circles with their conversation. This book is great for introducing children to the fun of poetry (which there is plenty of) and how manners were extremely important to children in 1865. This is a great and interesting read for children both young and old. Details: This novel was written to interest children in grades 3-6 and is on a 5.9 reading level.more
A classic. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the first installment of this classic story. It’s one of those movies that has been depicted in film for years, and will be interesting for children to read. This curious tale of Alice encourages children to glimpse a new world full of fun and exciting things. Things most would never even think of. It begins when Alice sees a White Rabbit running across the bank wearing a vest and holding a pocket watch. She decides to go on an adventure and follow this rabbit down his hole where she falls for what seems like ages. After growing and shrinking several times, she gets through a small door which leads to a whole different world. This world includes talking animals and cards. On this adventure through Wonderland, Alice comes across many strange circumstances and in trying to be polite gets caught in some people's company that is less than desirable (like the caterpillar, the Duchess, the Pig, the Mock Turtle, and the Red Queen). Alice enjoys exploring the world she entered through the White Rabbit’s hole that is so different from her own. But Alice finds these creature lack manners and sometimes run confusing circles with their conversation. This book is great for introducing children to the fun of poetry (which there is plenty of) and how manners were extremely important to children in 1865. This is a great and interesting read for children both young and old. Details: This novel was written to interest children in grades 3-6 and is on a 5.9 reading level.more
This follows largely the same plotline as the unpublished Adventures Underground I have just read, with the welcome additions of the Cheshire cat and the Mad Hatter's tea party. Wonderful stuff, though if pushed I would say that this seems to drag a bit in one or two places (to the extent that such a minor criticism is relevant to literary nonsense) and that Underground is probably a tauter piece of writing. John Tenniel's depiction of Alice in his illustrations here has become iconic, though I thought Carroll's own original illustrations are a little more haunting. 4.5/5more
This follows largely the same plotline as the unpublished Adventures Underground I have just read, with the welcome additions of the Cheshire cat and the Mad Hatter's tea party. Wonderful stuff, though if pushed I would say that this seems to drag a bit in one or two places (to the extent that such a minor criticism is relevant to literary nonsense) and that Underground is probably a tauter piece of writing. John Tenniel's depiction of Alice in his illustrations here has become iconic, though I thought Carroll's own original illustrations are a little more haunting. 4.5/5more
After reading The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland, I realized I was long overdue for a look at Alice in Wonderland – and what a short little book! And quite perfect for my level of mental energy the morning after a fever (though I didn't finish it all then). Might have to read Through the Looking-Glass, too. More as background & cultural education than as entertainment, though. It's very light and easy reading, but I didn't really find it terribly engaging or interesting. Then again, I've kinda grown out of the target age-group. Still...more
Alice, a young potentially schizophrenic British lass, is transported to a world of wonder upon following a white rabbit down the rabbit hole. What follows is a disjointed series of events as Alice explores Wonderland, the world of her dreams. Your reaction to this book probably varies based on where you happen to be on life's journey. A small child may view this is to be an amusing story full of talking animals and fantastical situations. Someone a little further on in their years may view this as a handbook of things not to do. For example, if there is a cup on a table with a sign that says "drink me"... don't. If there is a piece of cake next to aforementioned drink with a sign that says "eat me"... don't. Aside from Alice's somewhat poor decision making skills, this is a fun children's classic that everyone should read at least once.more
Alice, a young potentially schizophrenic British lass, is transported to a world of wonder upon following a white rabbit down the rabbit hole. What follows is a disjointed series of events as Alice explores Wonderland, the world of her dreams. Your reaction to this book probably varies based on where you happen to be on life's journey. A small child may view this is to be an amusing story full of talking animals and fantastical situations. Someone a little further on in their years may view this as a handbook of things not to do. For example, if there is a cup on a table with a sign that says "drink me"... don't. If there is a piece of cake next to aforementioned drink with a sign that says "eat me"... don't. Aside from Alice's somewhat poor decision making skills, this is a fun children's classic that everyone should read at least once.more
I had never read the original despite being familiar with multiple movie versions. The narration of the production I listened to was first rate, and there were definitely some humorous bits, but in the end the cleverness wore thin for me. This story is definitely full of originality.more
I had never read the original despite being familiar with multiple movie versions. The narration of the production I listened to was first rate, and there were definitely some humorous bits, but in the end the cleverness wore thin for me. This story is definitely full of originality.more
Silly but interesting.more
This is my boyfriend's favorite book, but quickly became one of mine, as well. I think that it was well written, funny, and there's a lot to take from it. In the end, I could go on and on about how much Alice seemed like a little brat, or how the mad tea party is my favorite scene, but that would make this review much bulkier than I would like. However, I would have to say that the story is able to be read over and over, which I have done.more
Who knew this children's classic was so horrible?? Not as bad as Looking Glass, probably because of having seen the movie I was a little desenstized to the complete and utter nonsense of it all.more
Who knew this children's classic was so horrible?? Not as bad as Looking Glass, probably because of having seen the movie I was a little desenstized to the complete and utter nonsense of it all.more
Read all 225 reviews

Reviews

Wonderful, nonsensical romp through a fantasy world. The characters are quirky and appealing, Alice is curious but goes along with things quite nicely. Be warned: if you are looking for a book that makes sense and is easy to follow, this is not for you! It's easy to see why this has tale captivated readers young and old for over 100 years.more
Wonderful, nonsensical romp through a fantasy world. The characters are quirky and appealing, Alice is curious but goes along with things quite nicely. Be warned: if you are looking for a book that makes sense and is easy to follow, this is not for you! It's easy to see why this has tale captivated readers young and old for over 100 years.more
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the Classic nonsense tale of an English girl falling down a rabbit hole, there to encounter the strange world of absurdly anthropomorphized animals and playing cards, enigmatic messages and, well, sizing issues :-D

A Classic is usually a novel that has become so ingrained in the collective memory or culture, that one might not be sure whether one has read it or not. The reputation of the book itself precedes the actual experience of reading it and the characters are often the prototypes of later iterations and any number of adaptations. If you've never experienced Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, or read it once before, or even if you've read it multiple times, it bears (another) reading. As familiar as many are with the tale, to actually read or hear the original, un-Disneyfied tale is a pleasure as the nuances of the language surface and fade in ephemeral logic and gently wry humor. The subtlety, whimsy and detail of Wonderland, its inhabitants and their language lends itself to repeated discoveries.

Michael York as the narrator of this audiobook edition brings a nice range of character voices to the story, never sounded absurd himself as he renders the tale of Alice with obvious affection and a master storyteller's grace. His smooth, somewhat effete British voice evokes the romance of an afternoon spent on the Thames and brings the curiouser and curiouser world of Carroll's creation to life.

Redacted from the original blog review at dog eared copy, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; 07/12/2011more
This is not as good as I expected. Lots of folks said it's really great... but I'm finding it rushed, and not compelling...more
The edition I read was actually an online version with the same illustrations and everything. It is a rather fun book, and is certainly far deeper than the "children's book" that it is depicted to be on its surface. I wouldn't say I loved it, but it was certainly worth finally reading the book behind a story I have heard so much about. The language twists alone made it well worth it, as there is definitely a lot of creativity there.more
The edition I read was actually an online version with the same illustrations and everything. It is a rather fun book, and is certainly far deeper than the "children's book" that it is depicted to be on its surface. I wouldn't say I loved it, but it was certainly worth finally reading the book behind a story I have heard so much about. The language twists alone made it well worth it, as there is definitely a lot of creativity there.more
As a child, I read the stories of Alice in Wonderland (and, later, Through the Looking Glass) with a sense of wonder and amusement. Alice shows that it is possible to engage with a world which makes no sense on her own terms; she is not overwrought at her lack of understanding of the improbable and bizarre happenings around her. She brings reason to bear in narrow, specific cases (such as when arguing with the Red Queen), but is not paralysed by the irrationality of general occurrence. In this, she is like all children - dealing with reality not by knowing, but by exploring and engaging. This sense of innocent inquiry creates great sympathy in the younger reader.As an adult (older, grizzled and perhaps wiser), re-reading these stories once again provokes wonder and amusement - but this time, the wonder is at the ingenuity of the author and the amusement is if anything greater. This shift in reaction is because, as an adult, I know a few things: I know that it is impossible (in general life!) for soldiers to be playing cards, for Cheshire cats to disappear from the tail and for children to shrink and grow at the slightest provocation. Knowing this increases my admiration for Lewis Carroll, as he has constructed a world where the impossible occurs, but not without its own logic.While there is nonsense, there is structure - and the impossibilities have the common feature that they are all things which might occur to an imaginative young child while daydreaming. Thus they are not simply random (which would be nowhere near so satisfying to read), they are linked and interlocked to form a thoroughly pleasing structure. The underlying structure of the poem Jabberwocky has been analysed at length in [Hoftstadter], which elicits further wonder at the interlinked meanings and senses in the work. The amusement, of course, comes from understanding more of the jokes!more
Ugh. Alice is ridiculously annoying. I did not enjoy the plot of this, the poetry, the constant repetition of ideas (the shrinking and growing). None of the characters were in any way interesting. I don't understand the universal love of this book.more
Timeless, relatable story for many young readers. Fosters and an amazing sense of imagination. Student learn that whenever they face an obstacle they can overcome it. One theme in this book is life being a puzzle. This story is similar to how a child might think. I think it would be a very good book to use in the classroom.more
Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland is a classic that everyone should read. His play with words, his insane universe with amazing characters, and his symbolism make this a work that can be read over and over. Each time I read it I discover new things, and look at it in a different way. Truly an amazing work by an amazing man.more
Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland is a classic that everyone should read. His play with words, his insane universe with amazing characters, and his symbolism make this a work that can be read over and over. Each time I read it I discover new things, and look at it in a different way. Truly an amazing work by an amazing man.more
First line:~ Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictiures or conversation, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?~I found this book intriguing and boring at the same time. I think that I have been contaminated by the movies and television shows so the book seemed too 'plain'. Not enough colour. It is one of the few times that I can say that I enjoyed the movie more than the book; usually it is the other way around.I did find that the change of topics from chapter to chapter was inconsistent but when you see that the whole thing is a dream, well, that is how dreams work isn't it? Not much connection between one thing and another, jumping from scene to scene. If I was going to read this to my children I would choose some kind of a Disney version because I think that the graphics, in this case, add a valuable dimension to the reading experience.I am glad that I read it but it will never be a re-read, unless I have a grand-child!more
A classic. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the first installment of this classic story. It’s one of those movies that has been depicted in film for years, and will be interesting for children to read. This curious tale of Alice encourages children to glimpse a new world full of fun and exciting things. Things most would never even think of. It begins when Alice sees a White Rabbit running across the bank wearing a vest and holding a pocket watch. She decides to go on an adventure and follow this rabbit down his hole where she falls for what seems like ages. After growing and shrinking several times, she gets through a small door which leads to a whole different world. This world includes talking animals and cards. On this adventure through Wonderland, Alice comes across many strange circumstances and in trying to be polite gets caught in some people's company that is less than desirable (like the caterpillar, the Duchess, the Pig, the Mock Turtle, and the Red Queen). Alice enjoys exploring the world she entered through the White Rabbit’s hole that is so different from her own. But Alice finds these creature lack manners and sometimes run confusing circles with their conversation. This book is great for introducing children to the fun of poetry (which there is plenty of) and how manners were extremely important to children in 1865. This is a great and interesting read for children both young and old. Details: This novel was written to interest children in grades 3-6 and is on a 5.9 reading level.more
A classic. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the first installment of this classic story. It’s one of those movies that has been depicted in film for years, and will be interesting for children to read. This curious tale of Alice encourages children to glimpse a new world full of fun and exciting things. Things most would never even think of. It begins when Alice sees a White Rabbit running across the bank wearing a vest and holding a pocket watch. She decides to go on an adventure and follow this rabbit down his hole where she falls for what seems like ages. After growing and shrinking several times, she gets through a small door which leads to a whole different world. This world includes talking animals and cards. On this adventure through Wonderland, Alice comes across many strange circumstances and in trying to be polite gets caught in some people's company that is less than desirable (like the caterpillar, the Duchess, the Pig, the Mock Turtle, and the Red Queen). Alice enjoys exploring the world she entered through the White Rabbit’s hole that is so different from her own. But Alice finds these creature lack manners and sometimes run confusing circles with their conversation. This book is great for introducing children to the fun of poetry (which there is plenty of) and how manners were extremely important to children in 1865. This is a great and interesting read for children both young and old. Details: This novel was written to interest children in grades 3-6 and is on a 5.9 reading level.more
This follows largely the same plotline as the unpublished Adventures Underground I have just read, with the welcome additions of the Cheshire cat and the Mad Hatter's tea party. Wonderful stuff, though if pushed I would say that this seems to drag a bit in one or two places (to the extent that such a minor criticism is relevant to literary nonsense) and that Underground is probably a tauter piece of writing. John Tenniel's depiction of Alice in his illustrations here has become iconic, though I thought Carroll's own original illustrations are a little more haunting. 4.5/5more
This follows largely the same plotline as the unpublished Adventures Underground I have just read, with the welcome additions of the Cheshire cat and the Mad Hatter's tea party. Wonderful stuff, though if pushed I would say that this seems to drag a bit in one or two places (to the extent that such a minor criticism is relevant to literary nonsense) and that Underground is probably a tauter piece of writing. John Tenniel's depiction of Alice in his illustrations here has become iconic, though I thought Carroll's own original illustrations are a little more haunting. 4.5/5more
After reading The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland, I realized I was long overdue for a look at Alice in Wonderland – and what a short little book! And quite perfect for my level of mental energy the morning after a fever (though I didn't finish it all then). Might have to read Through the Looking-Glass, too. More as background & cultural education than as entertainment, though. It's very light and easy reading, but I didn't really find it terribly engaging or interesting. Then again, I've kinda grown out of the target age-group. Still...more
Alice, a young potentially schizophrenic British lass, is transported to a world of wonder upon following a white rabbit down the rabbit hole. What follows is a disjointed series of events as Alice explores Wonderland, the world of her dreams. Your reaction to this book probably varies based on where you happen to be on life's journey. A small child may view this is to be an amusing story full of talking animals and fantastical situations. Someone a little further on in their years may view this as a handbook of things not to do. For example, if there is a cup on a table with a sign that says "drink me"... don't. If there is a piece of cake next to aforementioned drink with a sign that says "eat me"... don't. Aside from Alice's somewhat poor decision making skills, this is a fun children's classic that everyone should read at least once.more
Alice, a young potentially schizophrenic British lass, is transported to a world of wonder upon following a white rabbit down the rabbit hole. What follows is a disjointed series of events as Alice explores Wonderland, the world of her dreams. Your reaction to this book probably varies based on where you happen to be on life's journey. A small child may view this is to be an amusing story full of talking animals and fantastical situations. Someone a little further on in their years may view this as a handbook of things not to do. For example, if there is a cup on a table with a sign that says "drink me"... don't. If there is a piece of cake next to aforementioned drink with a sign that says "eat me"... don't. Aside from Alice's somewhat poor decision making skills, this is a fun children's classic that everyone should read at least once.more
I had never read the original despite being familiar with multiple movie versions. The narration of the production I listened to was first rate, and there were definitely some humorous bits, but in the end the cleverness wore thin for me. This story is definitely full of originality.more
I had never read the original despite being familiar with multiple movie versions. The narration of the production I listened to was first rate, and there were definitely some humorous bits, but in the end the cleverness wore thin for me. This story is definitely full of originality.more
Silly but interesting.more
This is my boyfriend's favorite book, but quickly became one of mine, as well. I think that it was well written, funny, and there's a lot to take from it. In the end, I could go on and on about how much Alice seemed like a little brat, or how the mad tea party is my favorite scene, but that would make this review much bulkier than I would like. However, I would have to say that the story is able to be read over and over, which I have done.more
Who knew this children's classic was so horrible?? Not as bad as Looking Glass, probably because of having seen the movie I was a little desenstized to the complete and utter nonsense of it all.more
Who knew this children's classic was so horrible?? Not as bad as Looking Glass, probably because of having seen the movie I was a little desenstized to the complete and utter nonsense of it all.more
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