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From the Publisher

Searching for a guidebook of the Washington, D.C., area that has all the practical information you need and will also enhance your family's experience at the area's attractions? Written by an experienced Washington, D.C., tour guide, this guidebook educates and entertains in a way that will make your visit to the nation’s capital even more special. This book combines the information of a travel guidebook with unique scavenger hunts designed for family interaction. The scavenger hunts involve items to find, tasks to complete and questions to answer at more than 50 main attractions in and around Washington, D.C. Examples of scavenger hunt tasks and questions found inside: 1. Lincoln Memorial: Find the spot on the steps where Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” Speech in 1963. What was his dream? 2. U.S. Capitol: Who was supposed to be buried in the Capitol Crypt? 3. Ford’s Theatre: Go outside the theater and find the alleyway where Booth escaped. Did anyone see him during his escape? 4. Smithsonian Institution National Air and Space Museum: Find the Apollo 11 space command module. Where did it fly? 5. Mount Vernon: Find the key to the Bastille prison in Paris that was given to Washington by his friend, the Marquis de Lafayette. This book also includes valuable recommendations for family friendly lodging and dining as well as useful information about annual festivals, parks, sports and recreational activities, amusement areas, the performing arts, and additional fun and educational activities in the greater Washington, D.C. area.

Published: Chris Sylvester on
ISBN: 9780983928225
List price: $6.99
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