South African Cookbook: Recipes From Table Mountain by James Newton - Read Online
South African Cookbook
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This ecookbook contains Traditional South African dishes, plus an insight to the colourful culture of Cape Town.
CONTENTS:
History and Influences on South African Cooking
Current Day South African Cuisine
South African English
SOUTH AFRICAN MAIN DISHES
OKRA DISHES
ROOIBOS DISHES
SOUTH AFRICAN DESERTS

Published: Springwood Emedia on
ISBN: 9781301881772
List price: $1.00
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South African Cookbook - James Newton

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Recipes From

Table Mountain

South African Recipes

James Newton

Smashwords Edition

Copyright 2012 Springwood emedia

CONTENT

History and Influences on South African Cooking

Current Day South African Cuisine

South African English

SOUTH AFRICAN MAIN DISHES

OKRA DISHES

ROOIBOS DISHES

SOUTH AFRICAN DESERTS

History and Influences on South African Cooking

Hunter gatherers first occupied this land of plenty thousands of years ago. Among them the nomadic San, Bushmen and Khoikhoi, collectively called The Khoisan lived mainly along the south-west coastal strips, their diets rich with meat and game. By the 3rd century AD, the Bantu people who had settled the eastern coastal areas, were practiced in farming, growing corn, sweet potato, millet and other vegetables and raising and keeping livestock such as cattle. It is very strange that fish didn't feature in the diets of the Khoisan, however there was a small group of native people called Goringhaicona who are said to have survived purely on shellfish and certain root vegetables.

The Portuguese were the first Europeans to set foot in South Africa, but it would be the Dutch, French Huguenots and English who would have the most influence on the local cuisine. The arrival of the Europeans was mainly because of a need to stop-over to find food en route to trade for spices back in the 1600s. Amongst other things they introduced sausage and stews such as potjiekos and bredies and cultivated crops such as beans, peas, spinach and lettuce.

The expansion and fortification of Dutch settlements led to the import of slaves towards the end of the 17th, whilst the first slaves were Africans from Mozambique, Madagascar and Angola, it became easier to import Malay slaves from Java. It was the Malay's superior knowledge of using spices and their expertise in fishing which change the flavours of Cape cooking. In 19th Century indentured workers from India came to work on the sugar plantations adding a further band to the culinary rainbow as did German immigrants.

Current Day South African Cuisine

Many dishes eaten today are closely based on dishes from past times, such as Pap, an accompaniment made from maize and eaten much like rice, which was and is a native black African staple, Bobotie, a spicy Malay dish similar to Shepherds Pie and Potjiekos which became an important dish during the Afrikaner's great trek. Amongst other favourites of the various cultures are biltong or dried meat, Boerewors, a type of sausage which is a legacy from German immigrants and Chakalaka which is a salad of Malay/Indian origin.

A popular South African pastime is the braai, equivalent to our barbecue, which also dates back from the trekking days. All manner of fresh foods are cooked over coals and most suburban houses have a braai area.

A typical South African meal can range from one dish to several dishes served at the same time or in courses. There are few hard and fast rules and this cuisine is wide ranging: from fresh crayfish simply cooked, to spicy Malay curries, to hearty Dutch stews and variations on the British meat pie.

South African English

Braai - What is a braai? It is the first thing you will be invited to when you visit South Africa. A braai is a backyard barbecue and it will take place whatever the weather. So you will have to go even if it's raining like mad and hang of a cold. At a braai you will be introduced to a substance known as mieliepap.

Ag - This one of the most useful South African words. Pronounced like the ach in the German achtung, it can be used to start a reply when you are asked a tricky question, as in: Ag, I don't know. Or a sense of resignation: Ag, I'll have some more pap then. It can stand alone too as a signal of irritation or of pleasure.

Donner -