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From the Publisher

Farmer Nick and Farmer Charlie are olive guys. They are neighbor farmers who raise two different varieties of olives, Sevillano and Manzanillo. Farmer Nick worked in olive orchards all through high school, and Farmer Charlie started farming after he was an adult. Text with photographs of Farmer Nick and Farmer Charlie tell the story of how olives are grown.
From the Farm to the Table series are books about agriculture designed for second and third grade readers. The text of each book highlights second grade vocabulary words.
Author Kathy Coatney runs an olive farm with her husband, and has spent the past 20 years working as a freelance photojournalist specializing in agriculture.

Published: Kathy Coatney on
ISBN: 9781301436798
List price: $3.99
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