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From the Publisher

More Than Just A Number asks the question “How do you find who you are, to challenge yourself to become all that you can be?”, and through this book, we hope that you start to realise your talent potential, and how to start acting on it.

Every person has a unique talent, and every individual has a talent in their own right. And this helps the whole be more than the sum of its parts.

We have become diminished, and because of this, we have become like a production line of humanity. We, as the individual, need to challenge ourselves to get out of the box that we have been put in, and rise up to our talent potential.

Published: Twin Wicks Publishing on
ISBN: 9781909241084
List price: $18.99
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