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From the Publisher

Everyday encounters--rich in frustration, investment, humor, opportunity and reward--offer a refining crucible for leadership. Although executive leadership is the domain of a select few, opportunities to lead at local levels are virtually endless regardless of title or position in life. With the heart of a parent and the probing questions of an executive coach, author Stosh D. Walsh shares 50 stories from everyday life, and offers practical insights to inspire growth in leaders everywhere.

Published: Stosh D. Walsh on
ISBN: 9780988884007
List price: $7.99
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