Is University Worth It? Essential Information about Employment Outcomes for Graduates by Michael Courtman - Read Online
Is University Worth It? Essential Information about Employment Outcomes for Graduates
0% of Is University Worth It? Essential Information about Employment Outcomes for Graduates completed

About

Summary

Considering university?

With student loan debt soaring and growing numbers of graduates in low-paid, menial jobs it's vital for the general public to have access to good information about employment outcomes for graduates.

Without accessible, impartial information and honest advice people can't make informed, rational decisions about what courses to take, whether or not to do an internship, and how to go about finding work after graduation.

This concise article will help provide students, parents and educators with a clearer picture of the graduate job market and help them to make better use of the employment services and information available on campus and through the Internet (approximately 9900 words, including references and resources).

Published: Michael Courtman on
ISBN: 9781301026012
Availability for Is University Worth It? Essential Information about Emplo...
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Reviews

Book Preview

Is University Worth It? Essential Information about Employment Outcomes for Graduates - Michael Courtman

You've reached the end of this preview. Sign up to read more!
Page 1 of 1

Introduction

With student loan debt soaring and growing numbers of graduates in low-paid, menial jobs it's increasingly vital for the general public to have access to good information about employment outcomes for graduates. Without accessible, impartial data and honest advice students can't make informed, rational decisions about what courses to take, whether or not to do volunteer work, and what sort of work to do after graduation. But at a time when good information and advice has never been more important, university press releases, and media statements by national politicians, are giving a distorted picture of the employment situation for graduates. In turn, this misleading information is encouraging undergraduates to make poor decisions about course selection, and is compounding the problems they face when they enter the job market. This booklet is intended to help provide students, parents and educators with a clearer picture of the graduate job market in North America, Britain and Australia and New Zealand, and help assist them to make better use of the services and information available on campus and through the Internet. Admittedly, money isn’t the only (or even the primary) reason why students undertake higher education, and the purpose of this article isn’t to pre-judge the motives of those who wish to go to university. However, most students at least want to find work that uses some of the skills or knowledge they’ve developed in their studies, and in today’s crowded job market an increasing number of them find they are unable to do so. This is why I believe prospective students and their parents deserve to be much better informed about the current employment situation for graduates.

The Education Industrial Complex

A General Overview

Although I’m not going to go into an in-depth discussion of the politics of higher education, I think it’s important that all students have a basic awareness of the economic environment in which modern universities operate. Over the last few decades the higher education sector has expanded so much, and public and private spending on tertiary education has reached such a point, that some economic and political commentators have started talking about an education industrial complex in the way that previous generations talked about a military industrial complex. An industrial complex implies a bloated network of public and privately funded organisations that lack transparency and aren't accountable to citizens and taxpayers.

A pervasive aspect of the modern education industrial complex is a growing trend towards greater commercialisation of higher education. Private universities and training institutes have long been a feature of the US tertiary education system, but the widespread commercialisation of higher education is a pretty recent phenomenon in other English-speaking countries.

In Commonwealth countries like Britain, Australia and New Zealand, public universities are now funded according to a market-driven bums on seats (or fannies on seats for American readers!) funding model in which the more students they enroll, the more money they receive from government subsidies and fee-paying students. Previously, universities were funded according to