Eating Disorders: Understanding Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder (BED) - Psychological and Behavioral Traits, Risk Factors, Tests and Solutions by Camille Heimbrod - Read Online
Eating Disorders
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Summary

This book aims to identify the different types of eating disorders, what causes them, their effects on sufferers and how can they be treated. Understanding eating disorders is the first step towards saving yourself or someone else who may be suffering.

If you are personally suffering from an eating disorder, then this book can help you learn more about your condition and where to get help.

And the next time you hear someone say “She’s so skinny,” you will finally be able to provide accurate information and dispel myths about eating disorders.

Published: Stories of Everyday's Woe Publishing House on
ISBN: 9781301202188
List price: $3.99
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Eating Disorders - Camille Heimbrod

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AUTHOR

INTRODUCTION

She’s so skinny! She must be anorexic is a remark often said when referring to someone who has lost a large amount of weight. But the truth is that eating disorders are not that simple. You cannot always tell if someone has an eating disorder just by looking at him or her. There are several forms of eating disorders, and not all of them result in extreme weight loss. In addition, eating disorders affect both men and women of all ages. Simply put, sufferers of eating disorders come in all shapes in sizes.

This book aims to identify the different types of eating disorders, what causes them, their effects on sufferers and how can they be treated. Understanding eating disorders is the first step towards saving yourself or someone else who may be suffering. If you are personally suffering from an eating disorder, then this book can help you learn more about your condition and where to get help. And the next time you hear someone say She’s so skinny, you will finally be able to provide accurate information and dispel myths about eating disorders.

Personal Stories

Claire’s Story

Claire sat on the examining table while her mother recounted everything that she ate yesterday. It was not much: a plain piece of toast for breakfast, an apple for lunch and half a fat-free yogurt and a banana for dinner. It was very obvious that Claire wanted to leave as soon as possible. I almost finished the yogurt! she told her mother heatedly, and then turned to the doctor: I need to lose five more pounds for ballet. Claire was only nine years old, and yet she was already starting to waste away.

Claire took up ballet lessons six months earlier. All of her fellow students were extremely thin, and so she felt that she should also be thin. But her mother, who had seen her own sister almost die of anorexia nervosa, felt that she was putting herself at great risk, both physically and emotionally. Consequently, she immediately brought Clair to a doctor. The doctor decided that Claire should temporarily stop attending ballet lessons. He likewise recommended that they should undergo family therapy.

Fortunately, Claire was able to recover from her eating disorder. Although she still has mild body image concerns, she is enjoying the life of a happy, healthy teenager.

Irene’s Story

Irene is a 60-year-old gym rat. Despite her age, she exercised as vigorously as a 20-year-old. She would weight herself in the changing room before and after workouts. Irene became noticeably thinner each week, leaving the other people in the gym wondering how she had the stamina to continue working out. But she kept on exercising every week, weighing herself before and after every session, until one day she just stopped going to the gym. The gym’s other patrons never saw her again.

Some patients with severe chronic anorexia do die from their condition, and, chances are, Irene may have been one of them.

Amanda’s Story

Amanda is a 32-year-old secretary who has serious body image problems. She has been restricting her calorie intake since she was 12 years old. Amanda believes that her dissatisfaction with her body was a result of several factors. Her best friend was extremely thin and was very conscious of her weight. Amanda’s mother was just as obsessed with dieting - she believed that appearances were very important. Every time Amanda and her mother meet, the first thing her mother says to her is You’ve gained a few pounds or You look so thin or You look good.

Amanda’s grandmother further contributed to her body image concerns. She referred to her granddaughter as chubby, and then in the next breath, offer her a piece of cake. Her grandmother’s conduct left Amanda confused over what she should do with herself.

Amanda’s dieting began slowly, but as compliments over her weight loss increased, she restricted her calorie intake to the point that it was already dangerously low. She became so fixated with food and her weight that she no longer had the time to engage in social activities. By the time she was 15, Amanda was binge-eating. She would buy food from one fast food joint to another and eat them in her car. After eating to the point of feeling sick, she would feel guilty about letting herself overeat. Amanda could not make herself vomit, so she used laxatives to rid her body of excess calories. She also starved herself - she recalls eating nothing but fruit and yogurt for three months. The cycle of bingeing, laxative use and starvation finally took a toll on Amanda’s health - she was rushed to the hospital in serious condition.

With the help of treatment, Amanda’s eating disorder ended. Although still not completely comfortable with her body and with herself, she has started to enjoy her job and being with her friends. In order to make herself feel less worried about her weight, she sticks to a 30-minute exercise routine. Looking back, Amanda believes that the root cause of eating disorders is modern society’s inordinate fixation with appearances. She feels that unless modern society starts to accept women as they really are, then eating disorders will persist.

Daniella’s Story

Daniella’s family moved to the United States from Mexico when she was only five years old. She had a difficult childhood - her parents separated when she was nine and money was tight. Daniella’s mother was too busy working to make ends meet, and so she was almost always hanging out with her friends. When Daniella was 14, she joined a modern dance group. She noticed that all the other girls in the dance group were thinner than she was, and so she decided to go on a diet. For several days, she restricted her calorie intake, losing two pounds as a result. Pleased with the outcome, Daniella continued dieting. On the second week of her diet, however, she was so starved that she bought cookies and chocolate bars on her way home from school. This incident began Daniella’s dangerous cycle of bingeing and restricting. She eventually withdrew from family and friends.