High Heart Attack Risk: Identify Important Risk Factors for Heart Disease Today by James Bogash, DC - Read Online
High Heart Attack Risk
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Summary

I have been publishing posts related to heart disease for many years. This book is a compilation of blog posts done over the years in a organized format with some additional commentary to help make the information clearer.

Many of the topics discussed in this book may be new to you and may never have been brought up by your personal physician. Unfortunately, there is a veritable chasm between the medical research and what primary care doctors and cardiologists seem to share with their patients.

The “standard” recommendations are usually decades behind the research I will be sharing with you. This is why every single comment is backed up by supporting medical research.

By clicking “Read more” you can find the links needed to look at the original medical research journal the information is centered around.

It is my hope that the concepts and ideas given in this book are going to help your understanding of your condition as well as help in improving your health as it relates to preventing and managing heart disease. There are many tools that can positively impact the health of your cardiovascular system.

In this book you will learn:

1. What causes heart disease
2. How can I tell if I'm at risk?
3. Problems with Cardiac Procedures and Meds
4. The Power of Lifestyle
5. Supplements and Heart Disease
6. Relationships with Other Diseases

Happy reading!

Published: James Bogash, DC on
ISBN: 9781301085293
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High Heart Attack Risk - James Bogash, DC

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I have been publishing posts related to heart disease for many years. This book is a compilation of blog posts done over the years in a organized format with some additional commentary to help make the information clearer.

Many of the topics discussed in this book may be new to you and may never have been brought up by your personal physician. Unfortunately, there is a veritable chasm between the medical research and what primary care doctors and cardiologists seem to share with their patients. The standard recommendations are usually decades behind the research I will be sharing with you. This is why every single comment is backed up by supporting medical research.

Each topic has a link back to the website so that you can read the original medical article that the post was centered around. By clicking Read more you can find the links needed to look at the original medical research journal the information is centered around. I have also provided links in the resource section, if you want to do more research for yourself or are looking for products that will help you on your journey to better health.

It is my hope that the concepts and ideas given in this book are going to help your understanding of your condition as well as help in improving your health as it relates to preventing and managing heart disease. There are many tools that can positively impact the health of your cardiovascular system.

I’m also introducing tools, called Dr. Bogash's Recommendations, which will give you three things you can do right away to improve your heart and blood vessel health.

1. What causes heart disease?

2. How can I tell if I'm at risk?

3. Problems with Cardiac Procedures and Meds

4. The Power of Lifestyle

5. Supplements and Heart Disease

6. Relationships with Other Diseases

Happy reading!

CHAPTER SUMMARIES

CHAPTER 1: WHAT CAUSES HEART DISEASE?

Society has led us to believe that heart disease is largely genetic. This removes your choices from the equation and leaves invasive procedures and medications as the only answer. This is just not true. It is estimated that 90% of what causes heart attacks and stroke are related to the choices we make in life. This chapter will go over some of these before I give some ideas to fix the problems.

CHAPTER 2: HOW CAN I TELL IF I'M AT RISK?

This chapter will begin to delve into some of the things that doctors look at to determine if you might be at risk for developing heart disease. Many of these can be modified by your lifestyle choices. We will also examine the cholesterol / statin drug story to see just how real it is when it comes to predicting your risk of a heart attack.

CHAPTER 3: PROBLEMS WITH CARDIAC PROCEDURES AND MEDICATIONS

Healthcare today involves identifying risk factors that have been linked to heart disease. Cholesterol, diabetes, blocked arteries, high blood pressure. Essentially, we check for these so that we can find something to medicate or do a procedure on. But if we do treat these problems through drugs and surgery, are we really making a difference, or is it possible that many patients who are medicated may actually be worse off?

CHAPTER 4: THE POWER OF LIFESTYLE

As someone who reads a lot of medical literature, I can tell you that the weight of the evidence suggests that there is nothing more powerful than lifestyle changes to prevent heart disease or to manage it once it is present. By now, you will realize that standard treatments in medicine today do little to change the true trajectory of a disease, and many times actually create problems that were not present originally. Lifestyle changes encompass four aspects: Dietary changes, Exercise, Stress Management and Environmental. We will address each of these separately in this chapter. Although some posts do cover all of these aspects, I have tried to separate them based on which aspect is primary.

CHAPTER 5: SUPPLEMENTS AND HEART DISEASE

While lifestyle changes are the most important player in avoiding and managing heart disease, there are some supplements that have held up well in the medical literature as being able to assist you in protecting your heart and blood vessels.

CHAPTER 6: RELATIONSHIP WITH OTHER DISEASES

Cardiovascular disease does not occur by itself. The risk factors for so many of today’s' chronic diseases are all linked. This can be very bad, since someone who suffers a heart attack many likely have colon cancer brewing in the early stages. On the plus side, this means that protecting against one chronic disease will automatically protect against all the others, giving you more bang for your buck when it comes to lifestyle changes. Just in case you think I'm making this up, in this chapter I will cover research linking a long list of other chronic diseases to heart disease. Hopefully you will see that the changes I have recommended in Chapter 4 and 5 are not merely to avoid a heart attack or stroke (although this is arguably a good enough reason on its own), but rather to lower you risk of every chronic disease.

CHAPTER 1: WHAT CAUSES HEART DISEASE

Society has led us to believe that heart disease is largely genetic. This removes your choices from the equation and leaves invasive procedures and medications as the only answer.

This is just not true. It is estimated that 90% of what causes heart attacks and stroke are related to the choices we make in life. This chapter will go over some of these before I give some ideas to fix the problems.

Inflammation

Normally, when we think of inflammation, we think of the process that occurs when we sprain an ankle. Redness, swelling, heat, pain. This process is driven by chemicals that create inflammation to combat the injury or to combat an infection. But what if these same compounds were directed inward at the walls of our blood vessels and the heart itself? Research strongly shows that inflammation plays a major role in damaging our heart and blood vessels.

Inflammation as a major player

While the research is plentiful, the concept that inflammation is a major player in CVD has been slow to catch on. This study is just another that adds to the research, with some additional tidbits added in. The higher the hsCRP levels (a marker in the blood of generalized inflammation), the sooner healthy women had heart attacks and the more likely these women were to experience a fatal heart attack. The real kick in the glut region is that the use of statin drugs to lower cholesterol probably is not having its impact on CVD risk via cholesterol, but rather by acting as an anti-inflammatory.

However, there are many other, much more potent, means of lowering inflammation that don’t involve medications that lower levels of CoQ10, an absolutely essential nutrient for healthy cell function.

Read medical journal article here

Inflammation and death in Chronic Heart Failure

This is an interesting article, looking at different types of inflammatory compounds in our body like tissue necrosis factor (TNF) and how they affect the heart.

As happens so often with human physiology and disease, we start to see the tangled web that decides our health. TNFalpha levels are increased by insulin and abdominal adipose tissue.

Both high insulin levels and obesity are linked to increased risk of heart disease. Could this be one of the mechanisms by which this occurs? Maybe this is the route by which whole grains protects against heart disease; by controlling the insulin response and lowering production of TNFalpha…

Read More

Support the immune system to protect the heart

The use of therapies to modulate the immune system in chronic heart failure is news to me. But this study shows a benefit in a therapy designed to support the immune system, and shows increased function of the left ventricle with this same therapy. Quite an achievement. Add to this other natural therapies to modulate the immune system, exercise and antioxidants such as CoQ10 and I’m sure the results will improve even further.

Read More

Blocking inflammation protects the heart

While I am wholeheartedly against blocking the action of such a powerful messenger within the body such as tumor necrosis factor, this article does promote a very interesting point–reducing inflammatory mediators can improve the function of the heart. How many cardiologists are familiar with anti-inflammatory natural therapies and lifestyle approaches? Sadly, the number is far too few.

Read More

Blocking inflammation shrinks enlarged heart

Now, while this is a rat study, the implications are pretty important. Basically, controlling inflammation by controlling the activity of NFKB actually reversed heart enlargement.

This has wonderful implications for those patients with congestive heart failure. While the drug companies are desperately trying to come up with an effective drug to inhibit activity of NFKB, nature has already provided us with several, including hops and rosemary. However, lifestyle changes to lower overall inflammatory burden and special attention to mitochondrial function would most likely help as well by removing the production of NFKB in the first place.

Read More

Heart surgery outcomes better without inflammation

Regardless of whether you’re on the heart cath table just starting to fade away from the anesthesia or are reading this from home, inflammation is a major, massive player in heart disease. We’ve spent so much time focusing on cholesterol levels, mainly because we had a drug that could lower cholesterol. So, we fit the disease risk factors to the drug that could control that risk factor. Only recently has inflammation (usually as measured with hsCRP) been looked at as a risk factor.

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the procedure in which a cardiologist pokes a camera into your coronary arteries to look at how healthy they appear. If there is a problem, the common answer is to place a stent in a blocked artery to make sure that blood continues to flow through this artery to feed the heart. The big problem with this procedure is that these stents have a tendency to plug back up again (restenosis). Two schools of thought exist– the use of bare metal stents or the use of drug eluting stents to lower the risk of restenosis. In this particular study, researchers determined that the inflammation levels were a major determinant in which a bare metal stent or a drug eluting one should be used.

Let’s simplify this. Manage your inflammation long before you need a